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  1. Richard E. Aquila (1988). Self-Consciousness, Self-Determination, and Imagination in Kant. Topoi 7 (1):65-79.
    I argue for a basically Sartrean approach to the idea that one's self-concept, and any form of knowledge of oneself as an individual subject, presupposes concepts and knowledge about other things. The necessity stems from a pre-conceptual structure which assures that original self-consciousness is identical with one's consciousness of objects themselves. It is not a distinct accomplishment merely dependent on the latter. The analysis extends the matter/form distinction to concepts. It also requires a distinction between two notions of consciousness: one (...)
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  2. Patrick E. Arens (2010). Kant and the Understanding's Role in Imaginative Synthesis. Kant Yearbook 2 (1).
  3. Gary Banham (2005). Kant's Transcendental Imagination. Palgrave Macmillan.
    The role and place of transcendental psychology in Kant's Critique of Pure Reason has been a source of some contention. This work presents a detailed argument for restoring transcendental psychology to a central place in the interpretation of Kant's Analytic, in the process providing a detailed response to more "austere" analytic readings.
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  4. Angela Breitenbach (2013). Beauty in Proofs: Kant on Aesthetics in Mathematics. European Journal of Philosophy 22 (3):n/a-n/a.
    It is a common thought that mathematics can be not only true but also beautiful, and many of the greatest mathematicians have attached central importance to the aesthetic merit of their theorems, proofs and theories. But how, exactly, should we conceive of the character of beauty in mathematics? In this paper I suggest that Kant's philosophy provides the resources for a compelling answer to this question. Focusing on §62 of the ‘Critique of Aesthetic Judgment’, I argue against the common view (...)
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  5. Luca Corti (2012). Crossing the Line: Sellars on Kant on Imagination. Verifiche: Rivista Trimestrale di Scienze Umane 41 (1-3):41-71.
    After Science and Metaphysics, Sellars’ encounter with Kant was characterized by acknowledging and working out the role played by imagination in perceptual experience. The mediating imaginative function provided him with a somewhat new and more Kantian account of the relationship between concepts and intuitions. After stressing the peculiar theoretical and exegetical background of Sellars’ approach to Kant – his project of “translating” his own ideas in the lingua franca of Kantianism – which has been influential in current normative interpretations of (...)
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  6. Wayne Cristaudo (1990). Theorising Ideas: Idee and Vorstellung From Kant to Hegel to Marx. History of European Ideas 12 (6):813-825.
  7. Clayton Crockett (2001). A Theology of the Sublime. Routledge.
    Crockett develops a constructive radical theology from the philosophy of Kant. Reading The Critique of Judgment back into The Critique of Pure Reason, Crockett draws upon the insights of such continental philosophers as Heidegger, Derrida, Lyotard and Deleuze. This book shows how existential notions of self, time and imagination are interrelated in Kantian thinking, and demonstrates their importance for theology. An original theology of the sublime emerges as a connection is made between the Kantian sublime of the Third Critique and (...)
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  8. Alfredo Ferrarin (2008). Imagination and Judgment in Kant's Practical Philosophy. Philosophy and Social Criticism 34 (1-2):101-121.
    My aim in this article is to understand the role of imagination and practical judgment in Kant's moral philosophy. After a comparison of Kant with Rousseau, I explore Kant's moral philosophy itself — unlike Hannah Arendt, who finds in the enlarged mentality of the third Critique the ground for the activity of imagination in a shared world. Instead, I place the concept of moral legislation in its background, the reflection on particulars relevant to deliberation, and discuss the mutual relation of (...)
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  9. Fausto Fraisopi (2005). Adamo Sulla Sponda Del Rubicone: Analogia E Dimensione Speculativa in Kant. Armando.
  10. Sarah L. Gibbons (1994). Kant's Theory of Imagination: Bridging Gaps in Judgement and Experience. Oxford University Press.
    This book departs from much of the scholarship on Kant by demonstrating the centrality of imagination to Kant's philosophy as a whole. In Kant's works, human experience is simultaneously passive and active, thought and sensed, free and unfree: these dualisms are often thought of as unfortunate byproducts of his system. Gibbons, however, shows that imagination performs a vital function in "bridging gaps" between the different elements of cognition and experience. Thus, the role imagination plays in Kant's works expresses his fundamental (...)
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  11. Hannah Ginsborg (2008). Was Kant a Nonconceptualist? Philosophical Studies 137 (1):65 - 77.
    I criticize recent nonconceptualist readings of Kant’s account of perception on the grounds that the strategy of the Deduction requires that understanding be involved in the synthesis of imagination responsible for the intentionality of perceptual experience. I offer an interpretation of the role of understanding in perceptual experience as the consciousness of normativity in the association of one’s representations. This leads to a reading of Kant which is conceptualist, but in a way which accommodates considerations favoring nonconceptualism, in particular the (...)
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  12. Gabriel Gottlieb (2007). Review: Kneller, Kant and the Power of Imagination. [REVIEW] Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal 28 (2):189-194.
  13. Jeanine Grenberg (2007). Imagination in Kant's Critique of Practical Reason. Journal of the History of Philosophy 45 (2):335-336.
  14. Daniel Guevara (2009). Kant and the Power of Imagination (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 47 (4):pp. 629-630.
  15. Robert Hanna (2003). Review: Weatherston, Heidegger's Interpretation of Kant: Categories, Imagination, and Temporality. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2003 (8).
  16. Robert Hanna (1998). How Do We Know Necessary Truths? Kant's Answer. European Journal of Philosophy 6 (2):115–145.
  17. Fiona Hughes (2010). Kant's Aesthetic Epistemology. Kantian Review 14 (2):155.
  18. Robert D. Hume (1970). Kant and Coleridge on Imagination. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 28 (4):485-496.
  19. Satoru Kimura (2000). Die Logik der Urteilskraft in der Theorie des Erhabenen bei Kant: Abgrund und Ubergang (in Japanese). Bigaku 51 (2):25-36.
    In dieser Abhandlung versuchen wir die Theorie des Erhabenen bei Kant als eine Logik der reflektierenden Urteilskraft darzustellen, die den Ubergang des Sinnlichen ins Ubersinnliche ermoglicht. Die Urteilskraft bezieht die Spannung der Einbildungskraft vor dem Nicht-Darstellbaren auf das Ubersinnliche, und in dieser Beziehung sieht Kant "eine a priori im Subjekte liegende Zweckmassigkeit". Durch die Vorstellung der gewaltigen Natur kann unsere innere Idee erweckt werden, wenn wir berucksichtigen, "dass auf jene moralischen Anlagen bei jeder schicklichen Veranlassung Rucksicht genommen werden sollte". Durch (...)
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  20. Jane Kneller (2007). Kant and the Power of Imagination. Cambridge University Press.
    In this book Jane Kneller focuses on the role of imagination as a creative power in Kant’s aesthetics and in his overall philosophical enterprise. She analyzes Kant's account of imaginative freedom and the relation between imaginative free play and human social and moral development, showing various ways in which his aesthetics of disinterested reflection produce moral interests. She situates these aspects of his aesthetic theory within the context of German aesthetics of the eighteenth century, arguing that Kant’s contribution is a (...)
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  21. John Llewelyn (2000). The Hypocritical Imagination: Between Kant and Levinas. Routledge.
    The Hypocritical Imagination: Between Kant and Levinas is an outstanding contribution to this vacuum. Focusing on Kant and Levinas, John Llewelyn takes us on a dazzling tour of the philosophical imagination. He shows us that despite the different treatments they accord to the imagination, there is much to be gained from comparing these two key thinkers. From Kant, Llewelyn shows how the imagination is the common root of all understanding. He contrasts this with the thought of Emmanuel Levinas, for whom (...)
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  22. Rudolf Makkreel (1984). Imagination and Temporality in Kant's Theory of the Sublime. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 42 (3):303-315.
  23. Rudolf A. Makkreel (1990). Imagination and Interpretation in Kant: The Hermeneutical Import of the Critique of Judgment. University of Chicago Press.
    In this illuminating study of Kant's theory of imagination and its role in interpretation, Rudolf A. Makkreel argues against the commonly held notion that Kant's transcendental philosophy is incompatible with hermeneutics. The charge that Kant's foundational philosophy is inadequate to the task of interpretation can be rebutted, explains Makkreel, if we fully understand the role of imagination in his work. In identifying this role, Makkreel also reevaluates the relationship among Kant's discussions of the feeling of life, common sense, and the (...)
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  24. Samantha Matherne (2014). The Kantian Roots of Merleau-Ponty's Account of Pathology. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 22 (1):124-149.
    One of the more striking aspects of Maurice Merleau-Ponty's Phenomenology of Perception (1945) is his use of psychological case studies in pathology. For Merleau-Ponty, a philosophical interpretation of phenomena like aphasia and psychic blindness promises to shed light not just on the nature of pathology, but on the nature of human existence more generally. In this paper, I show that although Merleau-Ponty is surely a pioneer in this use of pathology, his work is deeply indebted to an earlier philosophical study (...)
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  25. Samantha Matherne (2014). Kant and the Art of Schematism. Kantian Review 19 (2):181-205.
    In the Critique of Pure Reason, Kant describes schematism as a (A141/B180–1). While most commentators treat this as Kant's metaphorical way of saying schematism is something too obscure to explain, I argue that we should follow up Kant's clue and treat schematism literally as Kunst. By letting our interpretation of schematism be guided by Kant's theoretically exact ways of using the term Kunst in the Critique of Judgment we gain valuable insight into the nature of schematism, as well as its (...)
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  26. Samantha Matherne (2013). The Inclusive Interpretation of Kant's Aesthetic Ideas. British Journal of Aesthetics 53 (1):21-39.
    In the Critique of the Power of Judgment, Kant offers a theory of artistic expression in which he claims that a work of art is a medium through which an artist expresses an ‘aesthetic idea’. While Kant’s theory of aesthetic ideas often receives rather restrictive interpretations, according to which aesthetic ideas can either present only moral concepts, or only moral concepts and purely rational concepts, in this article I offer an ‘inclusive interpretation’ of aesthetic ideas, according to which they can (...)
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  27. Patricia M. Matthews (1996). Kant's Theory of Imagination. Review of Metaphysics 49 (4):923-925.
  28. M. Meyer (1981). The Transcendental Deduction of the Categories - its Impact on German Idealism and Neo-Positivism. Dialectica 35 (1-2):7-20.
    The aim of this paper is to exhibit some important features of the two versions of the deduction. In the first edition, Kant emphasizes the role of imagination as an autonomous faculty; in the second, On the contrary, Imagination, Though keeping its synthetic function, Is subordinated to the understanding. This reversal in the role of imagination is bound up to a paradoxical conception of the object which pervades the two editions of the "critique". The deduction should be conceived as a (...)
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  29. David Morris (2008). Reversibility and Ereignis: On Being as Kantian Imagination in Merleau-Ponty and Heidegger. Philosophy Today 52 (Supplement):135-143.
    This paper aims to clarify Merleau-Ponty’s difficult concept of “reversibility” by interpreting it as resuming the dialectical critique of the rationalist and empiricist tradition that informs Merleau-Ponty’s earlier work. The focus is on reversibility in “Eye and Mind,” as dismantling the traditional dualism of activity and passivity. This clarification also puts reversibility in continuity with the Phenomenology’s appropriation of Kant, letting us note an affiliation between Merleau-Ponty’s reversibility and Heidegger’s Ereignis: in each case being itself already performs the operation that (...)
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  30. G. Felicitas Munzel (1997). Review: Gibbons, Kant's Theory of Imagination. Philosophical Review 106 (3):485-488.
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  31. Brigitte Sassen (1993). Imagination and Interpretation in Kant: The Hermeneutical Import of the Critique of Judgment Rudolf A. Makkreel Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1990, Xi + 187 Pp., $31.20. [REVIEW] Dialogue 32 (02):416-.
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  32. Juliette Simont (1994). Review: Kant et le pouvoir de juger. [REVIEW] Bulletin de la Société Américaine de Philosophie de Langue Française 6 (3):95-100.
  33. P. F. Strawson (1982). Imagination and Perception. In Ralph Charles Sutherland Walker (ed.), Kant on Pure Reason. Oxford University Press.
  34. Daniel L. Tate (2011). Art as Cognitio Imaginativa: Gadamer on Intuition and Imagination in Kant's Aesthetic Theory. Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 40 (3):279-299.
  35. Alan Thomas, Perceptual Knowledge, Representation and Imagination.
    The focus of this paper will be on the problem of perceptual presence and on a solution to this problem pioneered by <span class='Hi'>Kant</span> [1781; 1783] and refined by Sellars [Sellars, 1978] and Strawson [Strawson, 1971]. The problem of perceptual presence is that of explaining how our perceptual experience of the world gives us a robust sense of the presence of objects in perception over and above those sensory aspects of the object given in perception. Objects possess other properties which (...)
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  36. Alan Thomas (2009). Perceptual Presence and the Productive Imagination. Philosophical Topics 37 (1):153-174.
  37. Giorgio Tonelli (1971). Review of H. Mörchen, The Role of Imagination in Kant. [REVIEW] Philosophy and History 4 (2):153-153.
  38. Christian Helmut Wenzel (2005). Spielen nach Kant die Kategorien schon bei der Wahrnehmung eine Rolle? Peter Rohs und John McDowell. Kant-Studien 96 (4):407-426.
  39. David W. Wood (2009). Kant and the Power of Imagination by Jane Kneller. European Journal of Philosophy 17 (3):464-468.
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  40. J. Michael Young (1988). Kant's View of Imagination. Kant-Studien 79 (1-4):140-164.
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