This category needs an editor. We encourage you to help if you are qualified.
Volunteer, or read more about what this involves.
Related categories
Siblings:
131 found
Search inside:
(import / add options)   Sort by:
1 — 50 / 131
  1. Lucy Allais (2010). Kant's Argument for Transcendental Idealism in the Transcendental Aesthetic. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 110 (1):47-75.
    This paper gives an interpretation of Kant's argument for transcendental idealism in the Transcendental Aesthetic. I argue against a common way of reading this argument, which sees Kant as arguing that substantive a priori claims about mind-independent reality would be unintelligible because we cannot explain the source of their justification. I argue that Kant's concern with how synthetic a priori propositions are possible is not a concern with the source of their justification, but with how they can have objects. I (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Henry E. Allison (2000). Where Have All the Categories Gone? Reflections on Longuenesse's Reading of Kant's Transcendental Deduction. Inquiry 43 (1):67 – 80.
    This paper contains a critical analysis of the interpretation of Kant's second edition version of the Transcendental Deduction offered by Béatrice Longuenesse in her recent book: Kant and the Capacity to Judge. Though agreeing with much of Longuenesse's analysis of the logical function of judgment, I question the way in which she tends to assign them the objectifying role traditionally given to the categories. More particularly, by way of defending my own interpretation of the Deduction against some of her criticisms, (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Karl Ameriks (2003). Problems From Van Cleve's Kant: Experience and Objects. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 66 (1):196–202.
  4. Richard E. Aquila (1977). The Relationship Between Pure and Empirical Intuition in Kant. Kant-Studien 68 (1-4):275-289.
  5. Ralf M. Bader (forthcoming). Self-Knowledge in §7 of the Transcendental Aesthetic. In Stefano Bacin (ed.), Proceedings of the XIth International Kant Kongress. de Gruyter.
    Kant's claim that time is a subjective form of intuition was first proposed in his Inaugural Dissertation. This view was immediately criticised by Schultz, Lambert and Mendelssohn. Their criticisms are based on the claim that representations change which implies that change is real. From the reality of change they then argue to the reality of time, which undermines its supposed status as a subjective form of intuition that only applies to appearances. Kant took these criticisms very seriously and attempted to (...)
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Nathan Bauer (2012). A Peculiar Intuition: Kant's Conceptualist Account of Perception. Inquiry 55 (3):215-237.
    Abstract Both parties in the active philosophical debate concerning the conceptual character of perception trace their roots back to Kant's account of sensible intuition in the Critique of Pure Reason. This striking fact can be attributed to Kant's tendency both to assert and to deny the involvement of our conceptual capacities in sensible intuition. He appears to waver between these two positions in different passages, and can thus seem thoroughly confused on this issue. But this is not, in fact, the (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Nathan Bauer (2010). Kant's Subjective Deduction. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 18 (3):433-460.
    In the transcendental deduction, the central argument of the Critique of Pure Reason, Kant seeks to secure the objective validity of our basic categories of thought. He distinguishes objective and subjective sides of this argument. The latter side, the subjective deduction, is normally understood as an investigation of our cognitive faculties. It is identified with Kant’s account of a threefold synthesis involved in our cognition of objects of experience, and it is said to precede and ground Kant’s proof of the (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Manfred Baum (1992). Kant on Pure Intuition. In Phillip D. Cummins & Guenter Zoeller (eds.), Minds, Ideas, and Objects: Essays in the Theory of Representation in Modern Philosophy. Ridgeview Publishing CompanyRidgeview Publishing Company.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Jonathan Francis Bennett (1966). Kant's Analytic. London, Cambridge U.P..
  10. Jocelyn Benoist (2004). « Le mythe du donné » et les avatars du kantisme analytique. Revue de Métaphysique et de Morale 4 (4):511-529.
  11. Sven Bernecker (2012). Kant on Spatial Orientation. European Journal of Philosophy 20 (4):519-533.
    This paper develops a novel interpretation of Kant's argument from incongruent counterparts to the effect that the representations of space and time are intuitions rather than concepts. When properly understood, the argument anticipates the contemporary position whereby the meaning of indexicals cannot be captured by descriptive contents.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Graham Bird (2013). Reply to Edward Kanterian. Kantian Review 18 (2):289-300.
    The reply to Kanterian offers a rebuttal of his central criticisms. It reaffirms the difference between Kant's arguments in the Aesthetic and at B 148-9; it rejects the alleged error of logic in Fischer's (and my) arguments; and it rejects Kanterian's reading of passages in the Preface (A xx-xxii) and of the Amphiboly. Beyond these specific points Kanterian assumes that Kant's project in the first Critique cannot be understood as a and so begs the question at issue.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Graham Bird (1999). Review: Falkenstein, Kant's Intuitionism: A Commentary on the Transcendental Aesthetic. [REVIEW] British Journal for the History of Philosophy 7 (1):147 – 153.
    Kant's Intuitionism: A Commentary on the Transcendental Aesthetic. Lorne Falkenstein. Toronto, University of Toronto Press, 1995. pp. xxiii + 465. £45?50. ISBN 0?8020?2973?6.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Henny Blomme (forthcoming). Kant et la matière de l'espace. Georg Olms Verlag.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Henny Blomme (2013). Können wir den ursprünglichen Raum erkennen? In Dieter Hüning, Stefan Klingner & Carsten Olk (eds.), Das Leben der Vernunft. Beiträge zur Philosophie Kants. De Gruyter. 30-39.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Brady Bowman (2011). A Conceptualist Reply to Hanna's Kantian Non-Conceptualism. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 19 (3):417 - 446.
    Hanna proposes a version of non-conceptualism he closely associates with Kant. This paper takes issue with his proposal on two fronts. First, there are reasons to dispute whether any version of non-conceptualism can be rightly attributed to Kant. In addition to pointing out passages that conflict with Hanna's interpretation, I also suggest ways in which the Kant of the Opus Postumum could integrate key insights of non-conceptualism into a basically conceptualist framework. In Part Two of the paper, I turn to (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Nicholas Bunnin (2008). God's Knowledge and Ours: Kant and Mou Zongsan on Intellectual Intuition. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 35 (4):613-624.
    This article examines Mou Zongsan's claim that “if it is true that human beings cannot have intellectual intuition, then the whole of Chinese philosophy must collapse completely, and the thousands years of effort must be in vain. It is just an illusion.” I argue that Mou's commitment to establishing and justifying a “moral metaphysics” was his main motivation for rejecting Kant's denial of the possibility of humans having intellectual intuition. I consider the implications of Mou's response to Kant for the (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Jill Vance Buroker (1997). Review: Falkenstein, Kant's Intuitionism: A Commentary on the Transcendental Aesthetic. [REVIEW] Kantian Review 1:162-171.
  19. Mario Caimi (2005). Gedanken ohne Inhalt sind leer. Kant-Studien 96 (2):135-146.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Emily Carson (2013). Pure Intuition and Kant's Synthetic A Priori. In Stewart Duncan & Antonia LoLordo (eds.), Debates in Modern Philosophy: Essential Readings and Contemporary Responses. Routledge. 307.
  21. Emily Carson (1997). Kant on Intuition in Geometry. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 27 (4):489 - 512.
  22. Emily Carson & Renate Huber (eds.) (2006). Intuition and the Axiomatic Method. Springer.
    By way of these investigations, we hope to understand better the rationale behind Kant's theory of intuition, as well as to grasp many facets of the relations ...
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Chung-Ying Cheng (2006). Theoretical Links Between Kant and Confucianism: Preliminary Remarks. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 33 (1):3–15.
  24. Andrew Chignell (forthcoming). Modal Motives for Noumenal Ignorance: Knowledge, Cognition, Coherence. Kant-Studien.
    Abstract: My goal in this paper is to show that Kant’s prohibition on certain kinds of knowledge of things-in-themselves is motivated less by his anti-soporific encounter with Hume than by his new view of the distinction between “real” and “logical” modality, a view that developed out of his reflection on the rationalist tradition in which he was trained. In brief: at some point in the 1770’s, Kant came to hold that a necessary condition on knowing a proposition is that one (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Phillip Cummins (1968). Kant on Outer and Inner Intuition. Noûs 2 (3):271-292.
  26. Roberto de Sá Pereira (2013). What is Nonconceptualism in Kant's Philosophy? Philosophical Studies 164 (1):233-254.
    The aim of this paper is to critically review several interpretations of Kantian sensible intuition. The first interpretation is the recent construal of Kantian sensible intuition as a mental analogue of a direct referential term. The second is the old, widespread assumption that Kantian intuitions do not refer to mind-independent entities, such as bodies and their physical properties, unless they are brought under categories. The third is the assumption that, by referring to mind-independent entities, sensible intuitions represent objectively in the (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. S. Dirschauer (2004). Kantian Theory of Auto-Affection. Kant-Studien 95 (1):53-85.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Denis Dumas (1994). Emmanuel Kant. Avant/Après. Dialogue 33 (01):164-.
  29. Michael Dummett (1982). Frege and Kant on Geometry. Inquiry 25 (2):233 – 254.
    In his Grundlagen, Frege held that geometrical truths.are synthetic a priori, and that they rest on intuition. From this it has been concluded that he thought, like Kant, that space and time are a priori intuitions and that physical objects are mere appearances. It is plausible that Frege always believed geometrical truths to be synthetic a priori; the virtual disappearance of the word ‘intuition’ from his writings from after 1885 until 1924 suggests, on the other hand, that he became dissatisfied (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Katherine Dunlop (2009). The Unity of Time's Measure: Kant's Reply to Locke. Philosophers' Imprint 9 (4):1-31.
    In a crucial passage of the second-edition Transcendental Deduction, Kant claims that the concept of motion is central to our understanding of change and temporal order. I show that this seemingly idle claim is really integral to the Deduction, understood as a replacement for Locke’s “physiological” epistemology (cf. A86-7/B119). Béatrice Longuenesse has shown that Kant’s notion of distinctively inner receptivity derives from Locke. To explain the a priori application of concepts such as succession to this mode of sensibility, Kant construes (...)
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Stephen Engstrom (2006). Understanding and Sensibility. Inquiry 49 (1):2 – 25.
    Kant holds that the human cognitive power is divided into two "stems", understanding and sensibility. This doctrine has seemed objectionably dualistic to many critics, who see these stems as distinct parts, each able on its own to produce representations, which must somehow interact, determining or constraining one another, in order to secure the fit, requisite for cognition, between concept and intuition. This reading cannot be squared, however, with what Kant actually says about theoretical cognition and the way understanding and sensibility (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Andrea Faggion (2013). Kant and Non-Conceptual Content. [REVIEW] Manuscrito 36 (2):343-354.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Joong Fang (1997). Kant and Mathematics Today: Between Epistemology and Exact Sciences. Edwin Mellen Press.
  34. Alfredo Ferrarin (2006). Goodbye is Too Good a Word: Sulle difficoltà del congedo di Ferraris. In , Congedarsi da Kant? Interventi sul Goodbye Kant di Ferraris. ETS. 13-35.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Alfredo Ferrarin (1995). Construction and Mathematical Schematism: Kant on the Exhibition of a Concept in Intuition. Kant-Studien 86 (2):131-174.
  36. Michael Friedman (2012). Kant on Geometry and Spatial Intuition. Synthese 186 (1):231-255.
    I use recent work on Kant and diagrammatic reasoning to develop a reconsideration of central aspects of Kant’s philosophy of geometry and its relation to spatial intuition. In particular, I reconsider in this light the relations between geometrical concepts and their schemata, and the relationship between pure and empirical intuition. I argue that diagrammatic interpretations of Kant’s theory of geometrical intuition can, at best, capture only part of what Kant’s conception involves and that, for example, they cannot explain why Kant (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Michael Friedman (2000). Geometry, Construction, and Intuition in Kant and His Successors. In Gila Sher & Richard L. Tieszen (eds.), Between Logic and Intuition: Essays in Honor of Charles Parsons. Cambridge University Press. 186--218.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Michael Friedman (1990). Kant on Concepts and Intuitions in the Mathematical Sciences. Synthese 84 (2):213 - 257.
  39. Karen Gloy (1984). Die Kantische Differenz von Begriff und Anschauung und ihre Begründung. Kant-Studien 75 (1-4):1-37.
  40. Terry F. Godlove (2011). Hanna, Kantian Non-Conceptualism, and Benacerraf's Dilemma. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 19 (3):447 - 464.
    Abstract Robert Hanna has recently advanced a theory of non-conceptual content, the central claim of which is that "it is perfectly possible for there to be directly referential intuitions without concepts". Hanna bases this claim in Kant's account of intuition in the Critique of Pure Reason, and so extends his Kantian non-conceptualism beyond the epistemology of empirical knowledge into the realm of mathematics. Thus, Hanna has proposed a Kantian non-conceptualist solution to a well-known dilemma set out by Paul Benacerraf in (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Aaron M. Griffith (2012). Perception and the Categories: A Conceptualist Reading of Kant's Critique of Pure Reason. European Journal of Philosophy 20 (2):193-222.
    Abstract: Philosophers interested in Kant's relevance to contemporary debates over the nature of mental content—notably Robert Hanna and Lucy Allais—have argued that Kant ought to be credited with being the original proponent of the existence of ‘nonconceptual content’. However, I think the ‘nonconceptualist’ interpretations that Hanna and Allais give do not show that Kant allowed for nonconceptual content as they construe it. I argue, on the basis of an analysis of certain sections of the A and B editions of the (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Paul Guyer (2003). The Cognitive Element in Aesthetic Experience: Reply to Matravers. British Journal of Aesthetics 43 (4):412-418.
    ...as a Kantian model of aesthetic experience a free play of the cognitive faculties with beliefs or propositions. This is false to Kant, whose conception is better interpreted as a free play with elements of cognition such as intuitions and concepts. More importantly, an account closer to Kant's original provides a less restrictive model of aesthetic experience than Matravers's interpretation does, and therefore one that more readily fits a much larger number of cases.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Robert Hanna (2011). Beyond the Myth of the Myth: A Kantian Theory of Non-Conceptual Content. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 19 (3):323 - 398.
    In this essay I argue that a broadly Kantian strategy for demonstrating and explaining the existence, semantic structure, and psychological function of essentially non-conceptual content can also provide an intelligible and defensible bottom-up theory of the foundations of rationality in minded animals. Otherwise put, if I am correct, then essentially non-conceptual content constitutes the semantic and psychological substructure, or matrix, out of which the categorically normative a priori superstructure of epistemic rationality and practical rationality - Sellars's "logical space of reasons" (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Robert Hanna (2011). Kant's Non-Conceptualism, Rogue Objects, and The Gap in the B Deduction. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 19 (3):399 - 415.
    This paper is about the nature of the relationship between (1) the doctrine of Non-Conceptualism about mental content, (2) Kant's Transcendental Idealism, and (3) the Transcendental Deduction of the Pure Concepts of the Understanding, or Categories, in the B (1787) edition of the Critique of Pure Reason, i.e., the B Deduction. Correspondingly, the main thesis of the paper is this: (1) and (2) yield serious problems for (3), yet, in exploring these two serious problems for the B Deduction, we also (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Robert Hanna (2005). Kant and Nonconceptual Content. European Journal of Philosophy 13 (2):247-290.
  46. H. S. Harris (1998). Review: Kerszberg, Critique and Totality. [REVIEW] Dialogue 37 (03):609-.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Dietmar H. Heidemann (ed.) (2012). Kant and Non-Conceptual Content. Routledge.
    Conceptualism is the view that cognizers can have mental representations of the world only if they possess the adequate concepts by means of which they can specify what they represent. By contrast, non-conceptualism is the view that mental representations of the world do not necessarily presuppose concepts by means of which the content of these representations can be specified, thus cognizers can have mental representations of the world that are non-conceptual. Consequently, if conceptualism is true then non-conceptualism must be false, (...)
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Dietmar H. Heidemann (2011). Introduction: Kant and Nonconceptual Content – Preliminary Remarks. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 19 (3):319 - 322.
    International Journal of Philosophical Studies, Volume 19, Issue 3, Page 319-322, July 2011.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. K. Heim (1909). Die Unterscheidung zwischen Erscheinungen und Funktionen als Grundlage für die Einteilung der Wissenschaften. Kant-Studien 14 (1-3):484-490.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. Edmund Heller (1993). Kant und J.S. Beck über Anschauung und Begriff. Philosophisches Jahrbuch 100 (1):72-95.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 131