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  1. Louis Agosta (1978). Kant's Treasure Hard-to-Attain. Kant-Studien 69 (1-4):422-443.
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  2. Henry E. Allison (2002). On the Very Idea of a Propensity to Evil. Journal of Value Inquiry 36 (2-3):337-348.
  3. Henry E. Allison (1990). Kant's Theory of Freedom. Cambridge University Press.
    In his new book the eminent Kant scholar Henry Allison provides an innovative and comprehensive interpretation of Kant's concept of freedom. The author analyzes the concept and discusses the role it plays in Kant's moral philosophy and psychology. He also considers in full detail the critical literature on the subject from Kant's own time to the present day. In the first part Professor Allison argues that at the center of the Critique of Pure Reason there is the foundation for a (...)
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  4. Karl Ameriks (1992). Review: Allison, Kant's Theory of Freedom. [REVIEW] Ethics 102 (3):655-.
  5. Anne Margaret Baxley (2010). The Aesthetics of Morality: Schiller's Critique of Kantian Rationalism. Philosophy Compass 5 (12):1084-1095.
  6. Sven Bernecker (2006). Kant on Moral Self-Awareness. Kant-Studien 97 (2):163-183.
  7. Sven Bernecker (2006). Kant zur moralischen Selbsterkenntnis. Kant Studien 97 (2):163-183.
  8. Mavis Biss (forthcoming). Kantian Moral Striving. Kantian Review.
    In this paper I argue that a dominant strand of Kant’s approach to moral striving in the Doctrine of Virtue does not fit familiar models of striving in that Kant makes it very difficult to conceptualize a fit between the end of moral perfection and the means that could be taken to pursue “strengthened” maxims. I outline a revised account of moral contemplation that addresses my worry regarding means-end fit. My account corrects notable deficiencies in existing approaches to Kantian moral (...)
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  9. Maria Borges (2008). Physiology and the Controlling of Affects in Kant's Philosophy. Kantian Review 13 (2):46-66.
  10. N. Brender (2001). Kant's Conception of Moral Character: The "Critical" Link of Morality, Anthropology, and Reflective Judgment. Philosophical Review 110 (3):440-443.
  11. Talbot Brewer (2002). The Character of Temptation: Towards a More Plausible Kantian Moral Psychology. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 83 (2):103–130.
    Kant maintained that dutiful action can have the fullest measure of moral worth even if chosen in the face of powerful inclinations to act immorally, and indeed that opposing inclinations only highlight the worth of the action. I argue that this conclusion rests on an implausibly mechanistic account of desires, and that many desires are constituted by tendencies to see certain features of one’s circumstances as reasons to perform one or another action. I try to show that inclinations to violate (...)
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  12. D. O. Brink (2000). Review: Sherman, Making a Necessity of Virtue: Aristotle and Kant on Virtue. Philosophical Review 109 (3):428-434.
    Recent moral philosophy has seen a revival of interest in the concept of virtue, and with it a reassessment of the role of virtue in the work of Aristotle and Kant. This book brings that reassessment to a new level of sophistication. Nancy Sherman argues that Kant preserves a notion of virtue in his moral theory that bears recognizable traces of the Aristotelian and Stoic traditions, and that his complex anthropology of morals brings him into surprising alliance with Aristotle. She (...)
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  13. David O. Brink (1999). Review: Engstrom & Whiting, Aristotle, Kant, and the Stoics. Philosophical Review 108 (4):576-582.
  14. Alexander Broadie & Elizabeth M. Pybus (1982). Kant and Weakness of Will. Kant-Studien 73 (1-4):406-412.
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  15. Randy Cagle (2005). Becoming a Virtuous Agent: Kant and the Cultivation of Feelings and Emotions. Kant-Studien 96 (4):452-467.
  16. Andrew Chignell (2013). Rational Hope, Moral Order, and the Revolution of the Will. In Eric Watkins (ed.), Divine Order, Human Order, and the Order of Nature.
    In this paper I sketch out one of the most important conditions on rational hope, and argue that Kant embraced a version of it. I go on to suggest that we can use this analysis to solve a longstanding 'conundrum' in Kant's ethics and religion regarding the nature of the individual moral revolution. -/- .
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  17. Kelly Coble (2003). Kant's Dynamic Theory of Character. Kantian Review 7 (1):38-71.
    Kant's moral theory has received trenchant criticism for its rigorism. Rigorism generally denotes an overemphasis on rules in moral theory, and a consequent neglect of the roles of emotional receptivity and perception in moral judgement. Critics of Kant's ethics have invoked the term rigorism with reference to any one of three overlapping features of Kant's moral theory. Usually rigorism designates the 'rigid and insensitive uniformities of conduct' that result from the mechanical application of rules. Occasionally it refers to the excessively (...)
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  18. Katerina Deligiorgi (2014). The Pleasures of Contra‐Purposiveness: Kant, the Sublime, and Being Human. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 72 (1):25-35.
    Serious doubts have been raised about the coherence of theories of the sublime and the usefulness of the concept. By contrast, the sublime is increasingly studied as a key function in Kant's moral psychology and in his ethics. This article combines methodological conservatism, approaching the topic from within Kant's discussion of aesthetic judgment, with reconstruction of a conception of human agency that is tenable on Kantian grounds. I argue that a coherent theory of the sublime is possible and useful, and (...)
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  19. Lara Denis (2000). Kant's Cold Sage and the Sublimity of Apathy. Kantian Review 4:48-73.
    Some Kantian ethicists, myself included, have been trying to show how, contrary to popular belief, Kant makes an important place in his moral theory for emotions–especially love and sympathy. This paper confronts claims of Kant that seem to endorse an absence of sympathetic emotions. I analyze Kant’s accounts of different sorts of emotions (“affects,” “passions,” and “feelings”), and different sorts of emotional coolness (“apathy,” “self-mastery,” and “cold-bloodedness”). I focus on the particular way that Kant praises apathy, as “sublime,” in order (...)
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  20. Sam Duncan (2012). Moral Evil, Freedom and the Goodness of God: Why Kant Abandoned Theodicy. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 20 (5):973-991.
    Kant proclaimed that all theodicies must fail in ?On the Miscarriage of All Philosophical Trials in Theodicy?, but it is mysterious why he did so since he had developed a theodicy of his own during the critical period. In this paper, I offer an explanation of why Kant thought theodicies necessarily fail. In his theodicy, as well as in some of his works in ethics, Kant explained moral evil as resulting from unavoidable limitations in human beings. God could not create (...)
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  21. J. Dybikowski (1999). Review: Engstrom & Whiting, Aristotle, Kant, and the Stoics: Rethinking Happiness and Duty. [REVIEW] Dialogue 38 (01):215-.
  22. Anthony Earls (1991). The Case of the Unmitigated Blackguard or Saving Kant's Moral Feelings. Southwest Philosophy Review 7 (1):119-128.
  23. Richard W. Eggerman (1980). Kant and Rational Imperatives of Happiness. Southwestern Journal of Philosophy 11 (1):43-50.
  24. E. Sonny Elizondo (forthcoming). More Than a Feeling. Canadian Journal of Philosophy:1-18.
    According to rationalist conceptions of moral agency, the constitutive capacities of moral agency are rational capacities. So understood, rationalists are often thought to have a problem with feeling. For example, many believe that rationalists must reject the attractive Aristotelian thought that moral activity is by nature pleasant. I disagree. It is easy to go wrong here because it is easy to assume that pleasure is empirical rather than rational and so extrinsic rather than intrinsic to moral agency, rationalistically conceived. Drawing (...)
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  25. E. Sonny Elizondo (2013). Reason in its Practical Application. Philosophers' Imprint 13 (21):1-17.
    Is practical reason a cognitive faculty? Do practical judgments make claims about a subject matter that are appropriately assessed in terms of their agreement with that subject matter? According to Kantians like Christine Korsgaard, the answer is no. To think otherwise is to conflate the theoretical and the practical, the epistemic and the ethical. I am not convinced. In this paper, I motivate my skepticism through examination of the very figure who inspires Korsgaard's rejection of cognitivism: Kant. For as I (...)
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  26. Frits Reitze Feldmeijer (2009). Trying to Understand Kant's Ethical Views. Journal of Value Inquiry 43 (2):221-241.
  27. David Forman (2013). Appetimus Sub Ratione Boni: Kant’s Practical Principles Between Crusius and Leibniz. In Stefano Bacin, Alfredo Ferrarin, Claudio La Rocca & Margit Ruffing (eds.), Kant und die Philosophie in weltbürgerlicher Absicht. de Gruyter.
  28. Paul Formosa (2011). A Life Without Affects and Passions: Kant on the Duty of Apathy. Parrhesia 13:96-111.
  29. Paul Formosa (2011). Discipline and Autonomy: The Kantian Link Between Education and Morality. In Klas Roth & Chris Surprenant (eds.), Kant and Education: Interpretations and Commentary. Routledge.
    In this paper I argue that Kant develops, in a number of texts, a detailed three stage theory of moral development which resembles the contemporary accounts of moral development defended by Lawrence Kohlberg and John Rawls. The first stage in this process is that of physical education and disciplining, followed by cultivating and civilising, with a third and final stage of moralising. The outcome of this process of moral development is a fully autonomous person. However, Kant’s account of moral development (...)
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  30. R. Z. Friedman (1984). The Importance and Function of Kant's Highest Good. Journal of the History of Philosophy 22 (3):325-342.
  31. Patrick Frierson, Kant's Empirical Psychology.
    This book offers a detailed explanation and analysis of Kant’s empirical psychology and applies that analysis to thinking through several particular issues in Kant’s philosophy more generally. Kant is one of the most important and widely discussed philosophers today and Oxford has a long tradition of publishing excellent monographs on Kant's philosophy (including, for example, recent books such as Robert Hanna’s Kant, Science, and Human Nature and Robert Louden’s Kant's Impure Ethics).
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  32. Ido Geiger (2011). Rational Feelings and Moral Agency. Kantian Review 16 (2):283-308.
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  33. Piero Giordanetti (2012). Rivoluzione Copernicano-Newtoniana E Sentimento in Kant. Peter Lang.
    This volume, developing research on a theme that has been addressed very little, deals with the relation between the discovery of a priori feelings and emotions in Kant’s Critique of Practical Reason and the «Preface» to the second edition of Kant’s Critique of Pure Reason in which he announces a revolution in the way of thinking. In Chapter One, I treat some aspects of the relation between the role of feel-ings and the Newtonian model in some of Kant’s pre-critical writings. (...)
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  34. Joshua M. Glasgow (2003). Expanding the Limits of Universalization: Kant's Duties and Kantian Moral Deliberation. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 33 (1):23 - 47.
    Despite all the attention given to Kant’s universalizability tests, one crucial aspect of Kant’s thought is often overlooked. Attention to this issue, I will argue, helps us resolve two serious problems for Kant’s ethics. Put briefly, the first problem is this: Kant, despite his stated intent to the contrary, doesn’t seem to use universalization in arguing for duties to oneself, and, anyway, it is not at all clear why duties to oneself should be grounded on a procedure that envisions a (...)
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  35. Jeanine Grenberg (2005). Kant and the Ethics of Humility: A Story of Dependence, Corruption and Virtue. Cambridge University Press.
    In recent years, philosophers have either ignored the virtue of humility or found it to be in need of radical redefinition. But humility is a central human virtue, and it is the purpose of this book to defend that claim from a Kantian point of view. Jeanine Grenberg argues that we can indeed speak of Aristotelian-style, but still deeply Kantian, virtuous character traits. She proposes moving from focus on action to focus on person, not leaving the former behind, but instead (...)
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  36. A. Phillips Griffiths (1991). Kant's Psychological Hedonism. Philosophy 66 (256):207 - 216.
    As far as consideration of man as phenomenon, as appearance, as an empirical self, is concerned, Kant appears to be a thoroughgoing psychological hedonist.
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  37. Paul Guyer (2012). Schopenhauer, Kant and Compassion. Kantian Review 17 (3):403-429.
    Schopenhauer presents his moral philosophy as diametrically opposed to that of Kant: for him, pure practical reason is an illusion and morality can arise only from the feeling of compassion, while for Kant it cannot be based on such a feeling and can be based only on pure practical reason. But the difference is not as great as Schopenhauer makes it seem, because for him compassion is supposed to arise from metaphysical insight into the unity of all being, thus from (...)
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  38. Willem Heubült (1980). Gewissen Bei Kant. Kant-Studien 71 (1-4):445-454.
  39. Ha Poong Kim (2005). On Kant's Hedonism. Idealistic Studies 35 (1):83-100.
    Kant’s ethical writings contain a hedonistic view of human motivation. This has been pointed out by several commentators. Less noticed, however, is his hedonic life perspective, present in his Anthropology from a Pragmatic Point of View and Critique of Judgment. This life outlook covers the full range of experience, so that Kant speaks not only of pleasures of the senses and the aesthetic imagination but also of pleasures felt through concepts (Begriffe) and ideas (Ideen). In the first part of the (...)
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  40. Michelle Kosch (forthcoming). Fichtean Kantianism in Nineteenth Century Ethics. Journal of the History of Philosophy 53 (1).
  41. Sylvie Loriaux (2010). Review: Reath, Agency and Autonomy in Kant's Moral Theory. Kantian Review 14 (2):149-151.
    Andrews Reath presents a selection of his best essays on various features of Kant's moral psychology and moral theory, with particular emphasis on his conception of rational agency and his conception of autonomy. The opening essays explore different elements of Kant's views about motivation, including his account of respect for morality as the distinctive moral motive and his view of the principle of happiness as a representation of the shared structure of non-moral choice. These essays stress the unityof Kant's moral (...)
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  42. A. Murray MacBeath (1973). Kant on Moral Feeling. Kant-Studien 64 (1-4):283-314.
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  43. Melissa McBay Merritt (2012). The Moral Source of the Kantian Sublime. In Timothy Costelloe (ed.), The Sublime: From Antiquity to the Present (pp. 37-49). Cambridge University Press.
    A crucial feature of Kant's critical-period writing on the sublime is its grounding in moral psychology. Whereas in the pre-critical writings, the sublime is viewed as an inherently exhausting state of mind, in the critical-period writings it is presented as one that gains strength the more it is sustained. I account for this in terms of Kantian moral psychology, and explain that, for Kant, sound moral disposition is conceived as a sublime state of mind.
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  44. Diane Morgan (1998). Amical Treachery: Kant, Hamann, Derrida and the Politics of Friendship. Angelaki 3 (3):143 – 150.
  45. James Bernard Murphy (2001). Practical Reason and Moral Psychology in Aristotle and Kant. Social Philosophy and Policy 18 (02):257-.
  46. Jeffrie G. Murphy (1967). Kant's Concept of a Right Action. The Monist 51 (4):574-598.
  47. Laura Papish (2007). The Cultivation of Sensibility in Kant's Moral Philosophy. Kantian Review 12 (2):128-146.
    In his later moral writings Kant claims that we have a duty to cultivate certain aspects of our sensuous nature. This claim is surprising for three reasons. First, given Kant’s ‘incorporation thesis’ − which states that the only sensible states capable of determining our actions are those that we willingly introduce and integrate into our maxims − it would seem that the content of our inclinations is morally irrelevant. Second, the exclusivity between the passivity that is characteristic of sensibility and (...)
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  48. Hans Reiner (1934). Das kantische sittengesetz im sittlichen bewusstsein der antike. Kant-Studien 39 (1-3):1-26.
  49. Ian Rottenberg (2014). Fine Art as Preparation for Christian Love. Journal of Religious Ethics 42 (2):243-262.
    This essay links Jean-Luc Marion's phenomenology of fine art to his description of Christian love. It does so by carefully showing how Marion's overall project is closely related to Kant's well-known account of the relationship between aesthetics and morality. While Kant and Marion both believe that aesthetic experience can lay the groundwork for moral action, their contrasting views of morality lead them to very different articulations of such a relationship. While Kant sees encounters with fine art as preparing individuals for (...)
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  50. Dieter Schönecker (2010). Kant über Menschenliebe als moralische Gemütsanlage. Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 92 (2):133-175.
    In the Introduction of the Tugendlehre, Kant identifies love of human beings as one of the four moral predispositions that make us receptive to the moral law. We claim that this love is neither benevolence nor the aptitude of the inclination to beneficence in general (both are also called love of human beings); rather it is amor complacentiae, which Kant understands as the delight in moral striving for perfection. We also provide a detailed analysis of Kant's almost completely neglected theory (...)
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