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  1. Herman Harris Aall (1924). Das Gesetz des moralischen Kontrastes zwischen Gefühl und Vorstellung. Kant-Studien 29 (2):386-394.
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  2. Mike Barber (1999). Philip Blosser: Scheler's Critique of Kant's Ethics. [REVIEW] Continental Philosophy Review 32 (1):105-110.
  3. J. Barnes (1998). Making a Necessity of Virtue: Aristotle and Kant on Virtue. N Sherman. The Classical Review 48 (2):353-354.
  4. Peter Baumanns (1983). The Virtues of Kant. New Studies in the History and Interpretation of Kant's Philosophy. Philosophy and History 16 (1):27-28.
  5. Anne Margaret Baxley (2010). Kant's Theory of Virtue: The Value of Autocracy. Cambridge University Press.
    Anne Margaret Baxley offers a systematic interpretation of Kant's theory of virtue, whose most distinctive features have not been properly understood. She explores the rich moral psychology in Kant's later and less widely read works on ethics, and argues that the key to understanding his account of virtue is the concept of autocracy, a form of moral self-government in which reason rules over sensibility. Although certain aspects of Kant's theory bear comparison to more familiar Aristotelian claims about virtue, Baxley contends (...)
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  6. Lewis White Beck (1978). Essays on Kant and Hume. Yale University Press.
  7. F. Behrend-Halle (1906). Der Begriff des reinen Wollens bei Kant. Kant-Studien 11 (1-3):109-117.
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  8. Lisa Bellantoni (1996). Kant on the Paradox of Self-Love. Southwest Philosophy Review 12 (2):123-131.
  9. John Beversluis (1974). Kant on Moral Striving. Kant-Studien 65 (1-4):67-77.
  10. Richard Dean (2012). A Plausible Kantian Argument Against Moralism. Social Theory and Practice 38 (4):577-597.
    There seems to be something wrong with passing moralistic judgments on others’ moral character. Immanuel Kant’s ethics provides insight into an underexplored way in which moralistic judgments are problematic, namely, that they are both a sign of fundamentally poor character in the moralistic person herself and an obstacle to that person’s own moral self-improvement. Kant’s positions on these issues provide a basically compelling argument against moralistic judgment of others, an argument that can be detached from the most controversial elements of (...)
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  11. Stephen Engstrom (2007). Kant on the Agreeable and the Good. Poznan Studies in the Philosophy of the Sciences and the Humanities 94 (1):111-160.
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  12. Patrick R. Frierson (2003). Freedom and Anthropology in Kant's Moral Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.
    This book is the first comprehensive account of Kant's theory of freedom and his moral anthropology. The point of departure is the apparent conflict between three claims to which Kant is committed: that human beings are transcendentally free, that moral anthropology studies the empirical influences on human beings, and that more anthropology is morally relevant. Frierson shows why this conflict is only apparent. He draws on Kant's transcendental idealism and his theory of the will and describes how empirical influences can (...)
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  13. Jeffrey A. Gauthier (1997). Schiller's Critique of Kant's Moral Psychology: Reconciling Practical Reason and an Ethics of Virtue. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 27 (4):513 - 543.
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  14. Jeanine Grenberg (2007). Dependent and Corrupt Rational Agency. Kant-Studien 98 (1):81-105.
  15. Jeanine Grenberg (2005). Kant and the Ethics of Humility: A Story of Dependence, Corruption and Virtue. Cambridge University Press.
    In recent years, philosophers have either ignored the virtue of humility or found it to be in need of radical redefinition. But humility is a central human virtue, and it is the purpose of this book to defend that claim from a Kantian point of view. Jeanine Grenberg argues that we can indeed speak of Aristotelian-style, but still deeply Kantian, virtuous character traits. She proposes moving from focus on action to focus on person, not leaving the former behind, but instead (...)
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  16. Jeanine M. Grenberg (2001). Feeling, Desire and Interest in Kant's Theory of Action. Kant-Studien 92 (2):153-179.
    Henry Allison's “Incorporation Thesis” has played an important role in recent discussions of Kantian ethics. By focussing on Kant's claim that “a drive [Triebfeder] can determine the will to an action only so far as the individual has incorporated it into his maxim,” (Rel 19, translation slightly modified) Allison has successfully argued against Kant's critics that desire-based non-moral action can be free action. His work has thus opened the door for a wide range of discussions which integrate feeling into (...)
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  17. Thomas E. Hill (2002). Human Welfare and Moral Worth: Kantian Perspectives. Oxford University Press.
    Thomas Hill, a leading figure in the recent development of Kantian moral philosophy, presents a set of essays exploring the implications of basic Kantian ideas for practical issues. The first part of the book provides background in central themes in Kant's ethics; the second part discusses questions regarding human welfare; the third focuses on moral worth-the nature and grounds of moral assessment of persons as deserving esteem or blame. Hill shows moral, political, and social philosophers just how valuable moral theory (...)
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  18. Philip Ho Hwang (1983). An Examination of Mencius' Theory of Human Nature With Reference to Kant. Kant-Studien 74 (3):343-354.
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  19. David N. James (1991). Kant's Virtue Ethics and the Cultivation of Moral Skills. Social Philosophy Today 6:29-41.
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  20. Paul Katsafanas (forthcoming). Kant and Nietzsche on Self-Knowledge. In João Constâncio (ed.), Nietzsche and the Problem of Subjectivity.
    Kant recognizes two distinct forms of self-knowledge: introspection, which gives us knowledge of our sensations, and apperception, which is knowledge of our own activities. Both modes of self-knowledge can go astray, and are particularly prone to being distorted be selfish motives; thus, neither is guaranteed to provide us with comprehensive self-knowledge. Nietzsche departs from Kant in arguing that these two modes of self-knowledge (1) are not distinct and (2) are far more limited than Kant acknowledges. In addition, Nietzsche departs from (...)
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  21. Paul Katsafanas (2012). Nietzsche and Kant on the Will: Two Models of Reflective Agency. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research.
  22. Christine M. Korsgaard (1999). Self-Constitution in the Ethics of Plato and Kant. Journal of Ethics 3 (1):1-29.
    Plato and Kant advance a constitutional model of the soul, in which reason and appetite or passion have different structural and functional roles in the generation of motivation, as opposed to the familiar Combat Model in which they are portrayed as independent sources of motivation struggling for control. In terms of the constitutional model we may explain what makes an action different from an event. What makes an action attributable to a person, and therefore what makes it an action, is (...)
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  23. Christine M. Korsgaard (1989). Personal Identity and the Unity of Agency: A Kantian Response to Parfit. Philosophy and Public Affairs 18 (2):103-31.
  24. Christine M. Korsgaard (1986). Aristotle and Kant on the Source of Value. Ethics 96 (3):486-505.
    Kant holds that the good will is a source of value, In the sense that other things acquire their values from standing in an appropriate relation to it. I argue that aristotle holds a similar view about contemplation, And that this explains his preference for the contemplative life. They differ about what the source of value is because they differ about which kind of activity, Ethical or contemplative, Discovers meaning and purpose in the world.
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  25. Béatrice Longuenesse (2012). Kant's'I'in'I Ought To'and Freud's Superego. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 86 (1):19-39.
    There are striking structural similarities between Freud's ego and Kant's transcendental unity of apperception, which for Kant grounds our use of ‘I’ in ‘I think’. There are also striking similarities between Freud's superego and Kant's account of the mental structure that grounds our use of ‘I’ in the moral ‘I ought to’. The paper explores these similarities on three main points: the conflict of motivations internal to the mind, the relation between discursive and pre-discursive representation of moral motivation, and the (...)
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  26. Bryan Lueck (forthcoming). Exposition and Obligation: A Serresian Account of Moral Sensitivity. Symposium.
    In The Troubadour of Knowledge, Michel Serres demonstrates, by means of an extended discussion of learning, that our capacity to adopt a position presupposes a kind of disorienting exposure to a dimension of pure possibility that both subtends and destabilizes that position. In this paper I trace out the implications of this insight for our understanding of obligation, especially as it is articulated in the moral philosophy of Immanuel Kant. Specifically, I argue that obligation is given along with a dimension (...)
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  27. Pawel Lukow (2003). Maxims, Moral Responsiveness, and Judgment. Kant-Studien 94 (4):405-425.
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  28. Adrienne M. Martin, Love, Kantian Style.
    We are interestingly ambivalent about romantic love, in a number of cases. Consider a man who abuses his wife, but is also passionate about her and easily distraught at the thought of losing her. There is some sense in which he loves her, but another in which he absolutely does not. Consider, too, a longtime partner who feels she has rather suddenly “fallen out of love” with the person to whom she was once devoted. She continues to feel there is (...)
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  29. Stephen J. Massey (1983). Kant on Self-Respect. Journal of the History of Philosophy 21 (1):57-73.
    Kant on Self-respect. SJ MASSEY Journal of the History of Philosophy La Jolla, Cal. 21:11, 57-73, 1983. L'A. veut montrer que selon Kant, toute immoralitcopyright est marque de manque de respect de soi.
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  30. Milton C. Nahm & Bryn Mawr (1957). „Sublimity“ and the „Moral Law“ in Kant's Philosophy. Kant-Studien 48 (1-4):502-524.
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  31. Martha C. Nussbaum (1997). Kant and Stoic Cosmopolitanism. Journal of Political Philosophy 5 (1):1–25.
  32. Lara Ostaric (2010). Works of Genius as Sensible Exhibitions of the Idea of the Highest Good. Kant-Studien 101 (1):22-39.
    In this paper I argue that, on Kant's view, the work of genius serves as a sensible exhibition of the Idea of the highest good. In other words, the work of genius serves as a special sign that the world is hospitable to our moral ends and that the realization of our moral vocation in such a world may indeed be possible. In the first part of the paper, I demonstrate that the purpose of the highest good is not to (...)
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  33. Emer O’Hagan (2009). Moral Self-Knowledge in Kantian Ethics. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 12 (5):525 - 537.
    Kant’s duty of self-knowledge demands that one know one’s heart—the quality of one’s will in relation to duty. Self-knowledge requires that an agent subvert feelings which fuel self-aggrandizing narratives and increase self-conceit; she must adopt the standpoint of the rational agent constrained by the requirements of reason in order to gain information about her moral constitution. This is not I argue, contra Nancy Sherman, in order to assess the moral goodness of her conduct. Insofar as sound moral practice requires moral (...)
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  34. John Paley (2007). Kant and the Ethics of Humility: A Story of Dependence, Corruption and Virtue. Nursing Philosophy 8 (2):139–141.
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  35. Laura Papish (2007). The Cultivation of Sensibility in Kant's Moral Philosophy. Kantian Review 12 (2):128-146.
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  36. Andrews Reath (2006). Agency and Autonomy in Kant's Moral Theory. Oxford University Press.
    Andrews Reath presents a selection of his best essays on various features of Kant's moral psychology and moral theory, with particular emphasis on his conception of rational agency and his conception of autonomy. Together the essays articulate Reath's original approach to Kant's views about human autonomy, which explains Kant's belief that objective moral requirements are based on principles we choose for ourselves. With two new papers, and revised versions of several others, the volume will be of great interest to all (...)
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  37. Klaus Reich (1939). Kant and Greek Ethics (I.). Mind 48 (191):338-354.
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  38. Klaus Reich (1939). Kant and Greek Ethics (II.). Mind 48 (192):446-463.
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  39. James Reid (2004). Morality and Sensibility in Kant: Toward a Theory of Virtue. Kantian Review 8 (1):89-114.
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  40. Motohide Saji (2009). Three Aspects of the Self-Opacity of the Empirical Subject in Kant. Philosophy and Social Criticism 35 (3):315-337.
    This article attempts to reconstruct Kant's view on the self-opacity of the empirical subject by exploring three aspects of his work: the unconscious, moral incentives and moral genealogy, and rule-following practice. `Self-opacity' means that one is unable to give an account of one's everyday activity, of why in one's everyday life one thinks and acts in the way one does. Kant's view thus recast gives us a sobering insight into our ordinary way of life. The insight is that we are (...)
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  41. Paul Saurette (2002). Kant's Culture of Humiliation: Politics and Ethical Cultivation. Philosophy and Social Criticism 28 (1):59-90.
    This article seeks both to challenge common understandings of Kant's moral project and to use that reading to reconceptualize the aims of political theory. The paper argues that while Kant's moral work is widely praised or criticized for its formalism and its defense of the autonomous subject, an interpretation that takes seriously Kant's remarks about humiliation in the Critique of Practical Reason challenges both these commonplaces. An examination both of the practical role that humiliation plays in Kant's moral system and (...)
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  42. George Schrader (1968). Kant and Kierkegaard on Duty and Inclination. Journal of Philosophy 65 (21):688-701.
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  43. Houston Smit & Mark Timmons (2011). The Moral Significance of Gratitude in Kant's Ethics. Southern Journal of Philosophy 49 (4):295-320.
    In this essay, we examine the grounds, nature and content, status, acquisition and role, and justification of gratitude in Kant's ethical system, making use of student notes from Kant's lectures on ethics. We are especially interested in questions about the significance of gratitude in Kant's ethics. We examine Kant's claim that gratitude is a sacred duty, because it cannot be discharged, and explain how this claim is consistent with his insistence that “ought” implies “can.” We argue that for Kant a (...)
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  44. Robert Stern (2010). Moral Scepticism and Agency: Kant and Korsgaard. Ratio 23 (4):453-474.
    One argument put forward by Christine Korsgaard in favour of her constructivist appeal to the nature of agency, is that it does better than moral realism in answering moral scepticism. However, realists have replied by pressing on her the worry raised by H. A. Prichard, that any attempt to answer the moral sceptic only succeeds in basing moral actions in non-moral ends, and so is self-defeating. I spell out these issues in more detail, and suggest that both sides can learn (...)
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  45. Chris W. Surprenant (2010). Kant's Contribution to Moral Education: The Relevance of Catechistics. Journal of Moral Education 39 (2):165-174.
    Kant’s deontological ethics, along with Aristotle’s virtue ethics and Mill’s utilitarian ethics, is often identified as one of the three primary moral options between which individuals can choose. Given the importance of Kant’s moral philosophy, it is surprising and disappointing how little has been written on his important contributions to moral education. Kant argues for a catechistic approach to moral education. By memorizing a series of moral questions and answers, an individual learns the basic principles of morality in the same (...)
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  46. Chris W. Surprenant (2010). Liberty, Autonomy, and Kant's Civil Society. History of Philosophy Quarterly 27 (1).
    Morality, as Immanuel Kant understands it, depends on the capacity of a person to be the agent and owner of his own actions, not merely a conduit for social and psychological forces and influences over which he has little or no control. As a result, Kant’s moral philosophy focuses primarily on the topic of individual freedom and the necessary preconditions of the possibility of that freedom. In the Groundwork and second Critique, Kant’s discussion of the connection between morality and freedom (...)
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  47. Chris W. Surprenant (2007). Cultivating Virtue: Moral Progress and the Kantian State. Kantian Review 12 (1):90-112.
    One apparent paradox in Kant's moral and political philosophy is that his perfectionist moral teachings appear to be linked to his anti-perfectionist political theory. Specifically, he writes that the perfection of moral character can take place only for an individual who is inside of civil society, a condition where no laws may legitimately be implemented expressly for the purpose of trying to make individuals moral. Kant believes that living in civil society is a necessary condition for an individual to refine (...)
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  48. David Sussman (2005). Kantian Forgiveness. Kant-Studien 96 (1):85-107.
    Although Kant’s moral philosophy is often presented as a kind of secularized Christianity, Kant seems to have very little to say about forgiveness, a topic of some traditional Christian interest. This reticence is particularly striking when we consider the central role in Kant’s thought played by ideas of obligation, responsibility and guilt.
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  49. Steven Sverdlik (2001). Kant, Nonaccidentalness and the Availability of Moral Worth. Journal of Ethics 5 (4):293-313.
    Contemporary Kantians who defend Kant''s view of the superiority of the sense of duty as a form of motivation appeal to various ideas. Some say, if only implicitly, that the sense of duty is always ``available'''' to an agent, when she has a moral obligation. Some, like Barbara Herman, say that the sense of duty provides a ``nonaccidental'''' connection between an agent''s motivation and the act''s rightness. In this paper I show that the ``availability'''' and ``nonaccidentalness'''' arguments are in tension (...)
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  50. Zvi Tauber (2006). Aesthetic Education for Morality: Schiller and Kant. Journal of Aesthetic Education 40 (3):22-47.
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