This category needs an editor. We encourage you to help if you are qualified.
Volunteer, or read more about what this involves.
Related categories
Subcategories:
335 found
Search inside:
(import / add options)   Order:
1 — 50 / 335
Material to categorize
  1. Herman Harris Aall (1924). Das Gesetz des moralischen Kontrastes zwischen Gefühl und Vorstellung. Kant-Studien 29 (2):386-394.
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
      Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  2. Mike Barber (1999). Philip Blosser: Scheler's Critique of Kant's Ethics. [REVIEW] Continental Philosophy Review 32 (1):105-110.
  3. J. Barnes (1998). Making a Necessity of Virtue: Aristotle and Kant on Virtue. N Sherman. The Classical Review 48 (2):353-354.
  4. Peter Baumanns (1983). The Virtues of Kant. New Studies in the History and Interpretation of Kant's Philosophy. Philosophy and History 16 (1):27-28.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  5. Anne Margaret Baxley (2010). Kant's Theory of Virtue: The Value of Autocracy. Cambridge University Press.
    Anne Margaret Baxley offers a systematic interpretation of Kant's theory of virtue, whose most distinctive features have not been properly understood. She explores the rich moral psychology in Kant's later and less widely read works on ethics, and argues that the key to understanding his account of virtue is the concept of autocracy, a form of moral self-government in which reason rules over sensibility. Although certain aspects of Kant's theory bear comparison to more familiar Aristotelian claims about virtue, Baxley contends (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  6. Anne Margaret Baxley (2004). Review: Stratton-Lake, Phillip, Kant, Duty and Moral Worth. [REVIEW] Kant-Studien 95 (3):388-389.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  7. Lewis White Beck (1978). Essays on Kant and Hume. Yale University Press.
  8. F. Behrend-Halle (1906). Der Begriff des reinen Wollens bei Kant. Kant-Studien 11 (1-3):109-117.
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
      Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  9. Lisa Bellantoni (1996). Kant on the Paradox of Self-Love. Southwest Philosophy Review 12 (2):123-131.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  10. Ermanno Bencivenga (2007). Consciousness and Intentionality: A Kantian Perspective. Epistemologia 30 (2):197-210.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  11. Carolyn Jane Benson, Autonomy and Purity in Kant's Moral Theory.
    Kant believed that the moral law is a law that the rational will legislates. This thesis examines this claim and its broader implications for Kant’s moral theory. Many are drawn to Kantian ethics because of its emphasis on the dignity and legislative authority of the rational being. The attractiveness of this emphasis on the special standing and capacities of the self grounds a recent tendency to interpret Kantian autonomy as a doctrine according to which individual agents create binding moral norms. (...)
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  12. John Beversluis (1974). Kant on Moral Striving. Kant-Studien 65 (1-4):67-77.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  13. Claudia Blöser (2015). Degrees of Responsibility in Kant’s Practical Philosophy. Kantian Review 20 (2):183-209.
    It has been argued that Kants actions. However, it would be uncompromising to allow for only two possibilities: either full responsibility or none. Moreover, in the Metaphysics of Morals Kant himself claims that there can be degrees of responsibility, depending on the magnitude of the obstacles that have to be overcome when acting. I will show that this claim is consistent with Kant’s theory as a whole and thereby make transparent how degrees of responsibility are possible for Kant. The solution (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  14. Jochen Bojanowski (2015). Categories of Freedom as Categories of Practical Cognition. Kantian Review 20 (2):211-234.
    Kant famously claims that the table of the categories of freedom does not require explanation,. Kant interpreters have been baffled by this claim, and the disagreement among the increasing number of studies in more recent years suggests that the table is not as straightforward as Kant took it to be. In this article I want to show that a coherent interpretation of the table depends essentially on a clarification of what have been taken to be three fundamental ambiguities in Kants (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  15. Jochen Bojanowski (2015). Kant on Human Dignity. Kant-Studien 106 (1):78-87.
    Name der Zeitschrift: Kant-Studien Jahrgang: 106 Heft: 1 Seiten: 78-87.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  16. Lourdes Borges (2013). Kant on Emotions and Williams' Criticism. Veritas: Revista de Filosofia da PUCRS 58 (1).
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  17. Gordon Brittan Jr (1995). Dieter Henrich, Aesthetic Judgment and the Moral Image of the World. [REVIEW] Philosophy in Review 15 (1):44-46.
  18. Alexander Broadie & Elizabeth M. Pybus (1975). Kant’s Concept of “Respect”. Kant-Studien 66 (1-4).
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  19. Micha Brumlik (2005). Aristotle and Kant. In Wolfgang Edelstein & Gertrud Nunner-Winkler (eds.), Morality in Context. Elsevier 137--57.
  20. Ardis B. Collins (1983). Kant's Conceptions of the Categorical Imperative and the Will. By T. N. Pelegrinis. Modern Schoolman 60 (2):138-139.
  21. Vincent M. Cooke (1992). Kant's Theory of Freedom. International Philosophical Quarterly 32 (1):128-130.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  22. Richard Dean (2012). A Plausible Kantian Argument Against Moralism. Social Theory and Practice 38 (4):577-597.
    There seems to be something wrong with passing moralistic judgments on others’ moral character. Immanuel Kant’s ethics provides insight into an underexplored way in which moralistic judgments are problematic, namely, that they are both a sign of fundamentally poor character in the moralistic person herself and an obstacle to that person’s own moral self-improvement. Kant’s positions on these issues provide a basically compelling argument against moralistic judgment of others, an argument that can be detached from the most controversial elements of (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  23. Stephen Engstrom (2007). Kant on the Agreeable and the Good. Poznan Studies in the Philosophy of the Sciences and the Humanities 94 (1):111-160.
  24. Alicia Villar Ezcurra (2005). La Compasión En Rousseau y Kant. Revista Portuguesa de Filosofia 61 (2):559 - 577.
    A vinculação do nome de Kant com o de Rousseau tem sido objecto de numerosos estudos desde o século XIX. Nesta linha, o objectivo do presente artigo é fazer um levantamento da problemática da compaixão presente nos dois autores. Com efeito, tanto Kant como Rousseau consideram que a compaixão é um sentimento natural, mas ambos diferem entre si no que respeita ao valor moral que lhe deve ser outorgado. Para Rousseau, a compaixão é a raiz da benevolência e de todos (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  25. Bernard Freydberg (2005). Imagination in Kant's Critique of Practical Reason. Indiana University Press.
    With particular focus on imagination, Bernard Freydberg presents a close reading of Kant’s second critique, The Critique of Practical Reason. In an interpretation that is daring as well as rigorous, Freydberg reveals imagination as both its central force and the bridge that links Kant’s three critiques. Freydberg’s reading offers a powerful challenge to the widespread view that Kant’s ethics calls for rigid, self-denying obedience. Here, to the contrary, the search for self-fulfillment becomes an enormously creative endeavor once imagination is understood (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  26. Jeffrey A. Gauthier (1997). Schiller's Critique of Kant's Moral Psychology: Reconciling Practical Reason and an Ethics of Virtue. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 27 (4):513 - 543.
  27. Loren Goldman (2012). In Defense of Blinders: On Kant, Political Hope, and the Need for Practical Belief. Political Theory 40 (4):497 - 523.
    Kant's progressive philosophy of history is an integral aspect of his critical system, yet it is often ignored or even treated as an embarrassment by contemporary scholars. In this article, I defend Kant and argue for the continuing relevance of his regulative assumption of historical progress. I suggest, furthermore, that the first-person stance of practical belief exemplified in Kant's conception of hope offers new resources for thinking about the relationship between the ideal and the real in political theory.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  28. Jeanine Grenberg (2001). Feeling, Desire and Interest in Kant's Theory of Action. Kant-Studien 92 (2):153-179.
    Henry Allison's “Incorporation Thesis” has played an important role in recent discussions of Kantian ethics. By focussing on Kant's claim that “a drive [Triebfeder] can determine the will to an action only so far as the individual has incorporated it into his maxim,” Allison has successfully argued against Kant's critics that desire-based non-moral action can be free action. His work has thus opened the door for a wide range of discussions which integrate feeling into moral action more deeply than had (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  29. Paul Guyer (2009). CHAPTER 4: Reason, Desire, and Action. In Knowledge, Reason, and Taste: Kant's Response to Hume. Princeton University Press 161-197.
  30. Thomas E. Hill (2002). Human Welfare and Moral Worth: Kantian Perspectives. Oxford University Press.
    Thomas Hill, a leading figure in the recent development of Kantian moral philosophy, presents a set of essays exploring the implications of basic Kantian ideas for practical issues. The first part of the book provides background in central themes in Kant's ethics; the second part discusses questions regarding human welfare; the third focuses on moral worth-the nature and grounds of moral assessment of persons as deserving esteem or blame. Hill shows moral, political, and social philosophers just how valuable moral theory (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   12 citations  
  31. Philip Ho Hwang (1983). An Examination of Mencius' Theory of Human Nature With Reference to Kant. Kant-Studien 74 (3):343-354.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  32. David N. James (1991). Kant's Virtue Ethics and the Cultivation of Moral Skills. Social Philosophy Today 6:29-41.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  33. Paul Katsafanas (2015). 4. Kant and Nietzsche on Self-Knowledge. In Bartholomew Ryan, Maria Joao Mayer Branco & João Constancio (eds.), Nietzsche and the Problem of Subjectivity. De Gruyter 110-130.
    Kant recognizes two distinct forms of self-knowledge: introspection, which gives us knowledge of our sensations, and apperception, which is knowledge of our own activities. Both modes of self-knowledge can go astray, and are particularly prone to being distorted be selfish motives; thus, neither is guaranteed to provide us with comprehensive self-knowledge. Nietzsche departs from Kant in arguing that these two modes of self-knowledge (1) are not distinct and (2) are far more limited than Kant acknowledges. In addition, Nietzsche departs from (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  34. Paul Katsafanas (2014). Nietzsche and Kant on the Will: Two Models of Reflective Agency. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 89 (1):185-216.
    Kant and Nietzsche are typically thought to have diametrically opposed accounts of willing: put simply, whereas Kant gives signal importance to reflective episodes of choice, Nietzsche seems to deny that reflective choices have any significant role in the etiology of human action. In this essay, I argue that the dispute between Kant and Nietzsche actually takes a far more interesting form. Nietzsche is not merely rejecting the Kantian picture of agency. Rather, Nietzsche is offering a subtle critique of the Kantian (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  35. Christine M. Korsgaard (1999). Self-Constitution in the Ethics of Plato and Kant. Journal of Ethics 3 (1):1-29.
    Plato and Kant advance a constitutional model of the soul, in which reason and appetite or passion have different structural and functional roles in the generation of motivation, as opposed to the familiar Combat Model in which they are portrayed as independent sources of motivation struggling for control. In terms of the constitutional model we may explain what makes an action different from an event. What makes an action attributable to a person, and therefore what makes it an action, is (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   11 citations  
  36. Christine M. Korsgaard (1989). Personal Identity and the Unity of Agency: A Kantian Response to Parfit. Philosophy and Public Affairs 18 (2):103-31.
  37. Manfred Kuehn (2009). Ethics and Anthropology in the Development of Kant's Moral Philosophy. In Jens Timmermann (ed.), Kant's Groundwork of the Metaphysics of Morals: A Critical Guide. Cambridge University Press
  38. Bryan Lueck (2014). Exposition and Obligation: A Serresian Account of Moral Sensitivity. Symposium: The Canadian Journal of Continental Philosophy 18 (1):176-193.
    In The Troubadour of Knowledge, Michel Serres demonstrates, by means of an extended discussion of learning, that our capacity to adopt a position presupposes a kind of disorienting exposure to a dimension of pure possibility that both subtends and destabilizes that position. In this paper I trace out the implications of this insight for our understanding of obligation, especially as it is articulated in the moral philosophy of Immanuel Kant. Specifically, I argue that obligation is given along with a dimension (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  39. Pawel Lukow (2003). Maxims, Moral Responsiveness, and Judgment. Kant-Studien 94 (4):405-425.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  40. Adrienne M. Martin, Love, Kantian Style.
    We are interestingly ambivalent about romantic love, in a number of cases. Consider a man who abuses his wife, but is also passionate about her and easily distraught at the thought of losing her. There is some sense in which he loves her, but another in which he absolutely does not. Consider, too, a longtime partner who feels she has rather suddenly “fallen out of love” with the person to whom she was once devoted. She continues to feel there is (...)
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  41. Stephen J. Massey (1983). Kant on Self-Respect. Journal of the History of Philosophy 21 (1):57-73.
    Kant on Self-respect. SJ MASSEY Journal of the History of Philosophy La Jolla, Cal. 21:11, 57-73, 1983. L'A. veut montrer que selon Kant, toute immoralitcopyright est marque de manque de respect de soi.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  42. Lovorka Mađarević (2009). Emotions as Motives in Kant's Ethics. Filozofska Istrazivanja 29 (2):335-348.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  43. Dean Moyar (2004). Review of Patrick Frierson, Freedom and Anthropology in Kant's Moral Philosophy. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2004 (3).
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  44. Milton C. Nahm & Bryn Mawr (1957). „Sublimity“ and the „Moral Law“ in Kant's Philosophy. Kant-Studien 48 (1-4):502-524.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  45. Martha C. Nussbaum (1997). Kant and Stoic Cosmopolitanism. Journal of Political Philosophy 5 (1):1–25.
  46. Lara Ostaric (2010). Works of Genius as Sensible Exhibitions of the Idea of the Highest Good. Kant-Studien 101 (1):22-39.
    In this paper I argue that, on Kant's view, the work of genius serves as a sensible exhibition of the Idea of the highest good. In other words, the work of genius serves as a special sign that the world is hospitable to our moral ends and that the realization of our moral vocation in such a world may indeed be possible. In the first part of the paper, I demonstrate that the purpose of the highest good is not to (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  47. Emer O’Hagan (2009). Moral Self-Knowledge in Kantian Ethics. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 12 (5):525 - 537.
    Kant’s duty of self-knowledge demands that one know one’s heart—the quality of one’s will in relation to duty. Self-knowledge requires that an agent subvert feelings which fuel self-aggrandizing narratives and increase self-conceit; she must adopt the standpoint of the rational agent constrained by the requirements of reason in order to gain information about her moral constitution. This is not I argue, contra Nancy Sherman, in order to assess the moral goodness of her conduct. Insofar as sound moral practice requires moral (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  48. John Paley (2007). Kant and the Ethics of Humility: A Story of Dependence, Corruption and Virtue. Nursing Philosophy 8 (2):139–141.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  49. Adrian M. S. Piper (2013). Practical Action – First Critique Foundations. In Margit Ruffing, Claudio La Rocca, Alfredo Ferrarin & Stefano Bacin (eds.), Kant Und Die Philosophie in Weltbürgerlicher Absicht: Akten des Xi. Kant-Kongresses 2010. De Gruyter 495-538.
    Both European and Anglo-American philosophical traditions of Kant scholarship draw a sharp distinction between Kant’s theoretical and practical philosophies. They cite KrV, A 14.23 –28; KrV, A 15.01– 09; KrV, B 28.22 – 28; KrV, B 29.01 –12 as evidence that the analyses of intuition, understanding and reason proffered in the first Critique apply to cognition only, and therefore do not significantly illuminate his analyses of inclination, desire, or respect for the moral law in the Groundwork, second Critique, Metaphysics of (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  50. Susan M. Purviance (1999). The Apriority of Moral Feeling. Idealistic Studies 29 (1/2):75-87.
    The apriority of moral feeling is an indispensable part of Kant's insistence on moral certainty as a foundation for ethics. Even though the moral feeling of respect cannot be the source of our knowledge of the authority of the moral law, moral feeling is a catalyst to self-criticism and moral self-confidence. It is argued that moral feeling reveals a nonempirical object, one's moral character. In fact, moral feeling plays a representational role that parallels sense experience, but does not derive from (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
1 — 50 / 335