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  1. Tom Bailey (2002). Kant and Autonomy Conference. Kant-Studien 93 (4):488-490.
  2. Noell Birondo (2007). Kantian Reasons for Reasons. Ratio 20 (3):264–277.
    Rüdiger Bittner has recently argued against a Kantian ‘maxims account’ of reasons for action. In this paper I argue—against Bittner—that Kantian maxims are not to be understood as reasons for action, but rather as reasons for reasons. On the interpretation presented here, Kantian maxims are the reasons for an agent’s being motivated by whatever more immediate reasons actually motivate her. This understanding of Kantian maxims suggests a recognizably realist Kantian position in ethics.
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  3. Antoon Braeckman (2008). The Moral Inevitability of the Enlightenment and the Precariousness of the Moment. Review of Metaphysics 62 (2):285-306.
    Kant’s essay An answer to the question: What is Enlightenment? has developed into the representative text of philosophical Enlightenment in the course of the past two hundred years. Yet most interpretations tend to assign to it a univocal meaning that is incompatible with its apparent polysemy. While taking the latter into account, the author closely investigates Kant’s essay and offers a balanced interpretation of its meaning. On the basis of this reading, it becomes apparent that we should understand Kant’s idea (...)
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  4. Georg Cavallar (2012). Review: Roth & Surprenant (Eds), Kant and Education: Interpretations and Commentary. [REVIEW] Kantian Review 17 (3):527-530.
  5. Adam Cureton (2014). Review: Hill, Virtue, Rules, and Justice: Kantian Aspirations. [REVIEW] Kantian Review 19 (1):171-176.
  6. Katerina Deligiorgi (2012). Review: González, Culture as Mediation: Kant on Nature, Culture, and Morality. [REVIEW] Kantian Review 17 (3):519-521.
  7. Paul Formosa (2011). Review: Anderson-Gold & Muchnik (Eds), Kant's Anatomy of Evil. [REVIEW] Kantian Review 16 (1):150-156.
  8. Ernesto V. Garcia (2000). The Social Nature of Kantian Dignity. Social Philosophy Today 16:127-139.
    Most scholars describe Kant’s idea of dignity as what I term his “vertical” account—that is, our human dignity insofar as we rise above heteronomous natural inclinations and realize human freedom by obeying the moral law. In this paper, I attempt to supplement this traditional view by exploring Kant’s neglected “horizontal” account of dignity—that is, our human dignity insofar as we exist in relationship with others. First, I examine the negative aspect of this horizontal account of dignity, found in Kant’s discussion (...)
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  9. Victor Eugen Gelan (2005). The categorical imperative and the need for pure ethics. International Journal of Philosophy of Culture and Axiology 3:189-198.
  10. Jens Gillessen (forthcoming). Kants ethischer Kohärentismus. Zur Rechtfertigung des Kategorischen Imperativs. Kant-Studien.
    In ethics, deductivism strives for self-evident premises as a foundation for normative claims, whereas coherentism seeks moral justification in relations between abstract normative claims and moral judgments. While Immanuel Kant is still widely believed to have pursued a deductivist project, the article contends that he endeavored to justify his moral philosophy in general as well as the Categorical Imperative in particular in the coherentist manner that has later on been advocated by John Rawls. First, the characteristics of Rawls’ method of (...)
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  11. Jürgen Goldstein (2010). Die Höllenfahrt der Selbsterkenntnis und der Weg zur Vergötterung bei Hamann und Kant. Kant-Studien 101 (2):189-216.
    In the Metaphysics of Morals Kant repeats Hamann's remark that “only the descent into the hell of self-cognition can pave the way to godliness”. This article pursues the question what Kant and Hamann meant by a “descent into the hell of self-cognition” and a “way to godliness”. It will be shown that they share an affinity in their assessment that evil is rooted in humanity and that moral improvement is necessary, but that their views nevertheless differ significantly. For this reason (...)
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  12. Martin Gottfried (1961). Probleme der prinzipienlehre in der philosophie kants. Kant-Studien 52 (1-4):173-184.
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  13. Thomas E. Hill (2010). Kant's Tugendlehre as Normative Ethics. In Lara Denis (ed.), Kant's Metaphysics of Morals: A Critical Guide. Cambridge University Press
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  14. Thomas E. Hill & Adam Cureton (2014). Kant on Virtue and the Virtues. In Nancy Snow (ed.), Cultivating Virtue: Multiple Perspectives. 87-110.
    Immanuel Kant is known for his ideas about duty and morally worthy acts, but his conception of virtue is less familiar. Nevertheless Kant’s understanding of virtue is quite distinctive and has considerable merit compared to the most familiar conceptions. Kant also took moral education seriously, writing extensively on both the duty of adults to cultivate virtue and the empirical conditions to prepare children for this life-long responsibility. Our aim is, first, to explain Kant’s conception of virtue, second, to highlight some (...)
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  15. Paul Katsafanas (forthcoming). The Problem of Normative Authority in Kant, Hegel, and Nietzsche. In Tom Bailey & João Constâncio (eds.), Nietzsche and Kantian Ethics.
    Kant and Hegel share a common foundational idea: they believe that the authority of normative claims can be justified only by showing that these norms are self-imposed or autonomous. Yet they develop this idea in strikingly different ways: Kant argues that we can derive specific normative claims from the formal idea of autonomy, whereas Hegel contends that we use the idea of freedom not to derive, but to assess, the specific normative claims ensconced in our social institutions and practices. Exploring (...)
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  16. Samuel J. Kerstein (2001). Korsgaard's Kantian Arguments for the Value of Humanity. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 31 (1):23-52.
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  17. Christine M. Korsgaard, A Reply to Carol Voeller and Rachel Cohon: “The Moral Law as the Source of Normativity” by Carol Voeller "The Roots of Reason" by Rachel Cohon.
    I am going to begin today by bringing together one of the themes of Carol Voeller’s remarks with one of the criticisms raised by Rachel Cohon, because I see them as related, and want to address them together. Voeller argues that the moral law is constitutive of our nature as rational agents. To put it in her own words, “to be the kind of object it is, is for a thing to be under, or constituted by, the laws which (...)
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  18. Marguerite La Caze (2013). Wonder and Generosity: Their Role in Ethics and Politics. State University of New York.
    Wonder and generosity -- Love and respect -- Responding to difference and similarity -- The relation between ethics and politics -- Cosmopolitanism, hospitality and refugees -- Wonder, radical evil and forgiveness -- Apology, forgiveness, and reconciliation.
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  19. James Edwin Mahon (2009). The Truth About Kant On Lies. In Clancy W. Martin (ed.), The Philosophy of Deception. Oxford University Press
    In this chapter I argue that there are three different senses of 'lie' in Kant's moral philosophy: the lie in the ethical sense (the broadest sense, which includes lies to oneself), the lie in the 'juristic' sense (the narrowest sense, which only includes lies that specifically harm particular others), and the lie in the sense of right (or justice), which is narrower than the ethical sense, but broader than the juristic sense, since it includes all lies told to others, including (...)
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  20. James Edwin Mahon (2006). Kant and the Perfect Duty to Others Not to Lie. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 14 (4):653 – 685.
    In this article I argue that it is possible to find, in the Groundwork, a perfect ethical duty to others not to lie to any other person, ever. This duty is not in the Doctrine of Virtue, or the Right to Lie essay. It is an exceptionless, negative duty. The argument given for this negative duty from the Universal Law formula of the Categorical Imperative is that the liar necessarily applies a double standard: do not lie (everyone else), and lie (...)
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  21. James Edwin Mahon (2006). Kant and Maria Von Herbert: Reticence Vs. Deception. Philosophy 81 (3):417-444.
    This article argues for a distinction between reticence and lying, on the basis of what Kant says about reticence in his correspondence with Maria von Herbert, as well as in his other ethical writings, and defends this distinction against the objections of Rae Langton ("Duty and Desolation", 1992). I argue that lying is necessarily deceptive, whereas reticence is not necessarily deceptive. Allowing another person to remain ignorant of some matter is a form of reticence that is not deceptive. This (...)
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  22. James Edwin Mahon (2003). Kant on Lies, Candour and Reticence. Kantian Review 7 (1):102-133.
    Like several prominent moral philosophers before him, such as St Augustine and St Thomas Aquinas, Kant held that it is never morally permissible to tell a lie. Although a great deal has been written on why and how he argued for this conclusion, comparatively little has been written on what, precisely, Kant considered a lie to be, and on how he differentiated between being truthful and being candid, between telling a lie and being reticent, and between telling a lie and (...)
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  23. Laura Papish (2015). Kant on the Independence of the Moral Law From Sensibility. Kantian Review 20 (1):77-98.
    There are several senses in which Kant’s moral law is independent of sensibility. This paper is devoted mainly to Kant’s account of ‘physical conditions independence’, or the idea that the moral law can compel us to pursue ends that might be impossible to realize empirically. Since this idea has gotten little attention from commentators, this paper addresses both its textual basis in Kant’s writings and its overall philosophical viability.
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  24. Frederick Rauscher (1996). Pure Reason and the Moral Law: A Source of Kant's Critical Philosophy. History of Philosophy Quarterly 13 (2):255 - 271.
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  25. Laurence Thomas (1996). Virtue Ethics and the Arc of Universality: Reflections on Punzo's Reading of Kantian and Virtue Ethics. Philosophical Psychology 9 (1):25 – 32.
    While I agree with Punzo's central thesis that virtue ethics is superior to Kantian ethics, the aims of my comments are twofold. On the one hand, I draw attention to some ways in which Punzo overstates the case against Kantian ethics, noting that unattainable ideals as such are no mark against a moral theory. On the other, I build upon Punzo's insights in order to bring into sharper focus the superiority of virtue ethics. Accordingly, I distinguish between inter-species (Kantian ethics) (...)
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  26. Federico Ignacio Viola (2014). Consideraciones en torno a la concepción kantiana de dignidad humana desde una perspectiva heterónoma. Revista de Filosofía (Madrid) 39 (1):187-201.
    En el presente artículo se arriesga una nueva interpretación del concepto kantiano de autonomía, abordándolo desde una perspectiva “heterónoma”. En efecto, sin soslayar la interpretación ya clásica de aquél se indaga sobre la posibilidad de pensarlo como tributario de una heteronomía que señala de alguna manera a la autonomía una dignidad sobre la cual ésta no puede tener prácticamente ninguna injerencia. Se pone de relieve así pues el hecho de que esta dignidad inviolable marca una diferencia práctica más radical que (...)
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  27. Owen Ware (2012). Review: Roth, Klas and Surprenant, Chris (Eds.), Kant and Education: Interpretations and Commentary. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews:unknown.
    Kant and Education brings together sixteen essays by an international group of scholars. The range of topics covered in the anthology is impressive. Kant's contribution to contemporary theories of education is central, as well as Kant's intellectual debt to Rousseau, the role of education in Kant's normative theories, and the impact of Kant's ideas on subsequent generations. Add to this the relative shortness of each essay (ten to fifteen pages), and one is left with an accessible introduction to a fascinating, (...)
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  28. Victoria S. Wike (2014). Kantian Friendship: Duty and Idea. Diametros 39:140-153.
    Kant commentators have recently begun to pay attention to Kant’s account of friendship. They have asked questions, such as: Is his description of friendship consistent and robust and does it provide an account of friendship that satisfies common intuitions and expectations of friendship? Their answers to these questions have often been negative. At the same time, many of these critics share a common understanding of two basic aspects of Kant’s account of friendship. Kant sees friendship as both a duty and (...)
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  29. Julian Wuerth (2016). What Should I Do? Routledge.
    Of all his contributions to philosophy it is perhaps Kant's writings on ethics that are the most widely read. Kant himself posed the famous question: What should I do? In this engaging and lucid book Julian Wuerth explores the question that frames Kant's moral philosophy and places it in a contemporary context, offering a stimulating and direct path into Kant's moral thought. He opens with a helpful introduction to the main traditions in ethics prior to Kant before outlining Kant’s theory (...)
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