This category needs an editor. We encourage you to help if you are qualified.
Volunteer, or read more about what this involves.
Related categories
Siblings:
20 found
Search inside:
(import / add options)   Sort by:
  1. Tom Bailey (2002). Kant and Autonomy Conference. Kant-Studien 93 (4):488-490.
  2. Noell Birondo (2007). Kantian Reasons for Reasons. Ratio 20 (3):264–277.
    Rüdiger Bittner has recently argued against a Kantian ‘maxims account’ of reasons for action. In this paper I argue – against Bittner – that Kantian maxims are not to be understood as reasons for action, but rather as reasons for reasons. On the interpretation presented here, Kantian maxims are the reasons for an agent’s being motivated by whatever more immediate reasons actually motivate her. This understanding of Kantian maxims suggests a recognizably realist Kantian position in ethics.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Antoon Braeckman (2008). The Moral Inevitability of the Enlightenment and the Precariousness of the Moment. Review of Metaphysics 62 (2):285-306.
    Kant’s essay An answer to the question: What is Enlightenment? has developed into the representative text of philosophical Enlightenment in the course of the past two hundred years. Yet most interpretations tend to assign to it a univocal meaning that is incompatible with its apparent polysemy. While taking the latter into account, the author closely investigates Kant’s essay and offers a balanced interpretation of its meaning. On the basis of this reading, it becomes apparent that we should understand Kant’s idea (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Georg Cavallar (2012). Review: Roth & Surprenant (Eds), Kant and Education: Interpretations and Commentary. [REVIEW] Kantian Review 17 (3):527-530.
  5. Adam Cureton (2014). Review: Hill, Virtue, Rules, and Justice: Kantian Aspirations. [REVIEW] Kantian Review 19 (1):171-176.
  6. Katerina Deligiorgi (2012). Review: González, Culture as Mediation: Kant on Nature, Culture, and Morality. [REVIEW] Kantian Review 17 (3):519-521.
  7. Paul Formosa (2011). Review: Anderson-Gold & Muchnik (Eds), Kant's Anatomy of Evil. [REVIEW] Kantian Review 16 (1):150-156.
  8. Ernesto V. Garcia (2000). The Social Nature of Kantian Dignity. Social Philosophy Today 16:127-139.
    Most scholars describe Kant’s idea of dignity as what I term his “vertical” account—that is, our human dignity insofar as we rise above heteronomous natural inclinations and realize human freedom by obeying the moral law. In this paper, I attempt to supplement this traditional view by exploring Kant’s neglected “horizontal” account of dignity—that is, our human dignity insofar as we exist in relationship with others. First, I examine the negative aspect of this horizontal account of dignity, found in Kant’s discussion (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Jürgen Goldstein (2010). Die Höllenfahrt der Selbsterkenntnis und der Weg zur Vergötterung bei Hamann und Kant. Kant-Studien 101 (2):189-216.
    In the Metaphysics of Morals Kant repeats Hamann's remark that “only the descent into the hell of self-cognition can pave the way to godliness”. This article pursues the question what Kant and Hamann meant by a “descent into the hell of self-cognition” and a “way to godliness”. It will be shown that they share an affinity in their assessment that evil is rooted in humanity and that moral improvement is necessary, but that their views nevertheless differ significantly. For this reason (...)
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Martin Gottfried (1961). Probleme der prinzipienlehre in der philosophie kants. Kant-Studien 52 (1-4):173-184.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Thomas Hill (2010). Kant's Tugendlehre as Normative Ethics. In Lara Denis (ed.), Kant's Metaphysics of Morals: A Critical Guide. Cambridge University Press.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Paul Katsafanas (forthcoming). The Problem of Normative Authority in Kant, Hegel, and Nietzsche. In Tom Bailey & João Constâncio (eds.), Nietzsche and Kantian Ethics.
    Kant and Hegel share a common foundational idea: they believe that the authority of normative claims can be justified only by showing that these norms are self-imposed or autonomous. Yet they develop this idea in strikingly different ways: Kant argues that we can derive specific normative claims from the formal idea of autonomy, whereas Hegel contends that we use the idea of freedom not to derive, but to assess, the specific normative claims ensconced in our social institutions and practices. Exploring (...)
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Samuel J. Kerstein (2001). Korsgaard's Kantian Arguments for the Value of Humanity. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 31 (1):23-52.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Christine M. Korsgaard, A Reply to Carol Voeller and Rachel Cohon: “The Moral Law as the Source of Normativity” by Carol Voeller "The Roots of Reason" by Rachel Cohon.
    I am going to begin today by bringing together one of the themes of Carol Voeller’s remarks with one of the criticisms raised by Rachel Cohon, because I see them as related, and want to address them together. Voeller argues that the moral law is constitutive of our nature as rational agents. To put it in her own words, “to be the kind of object it is, is for a thing to be under, or constituted by, the laws which are (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. James Edwin Mahon (2009). The Truth About Kant on Lies. In Clancy W. Martin (ed.), The Philosophy of Deception. Oxford University Press.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. James Edwin Mahon (2006). Kant and Maria Von Herbert: Reticence Vs. Deception. Philosophy 81 (3):417-444.
    This article argues for a distinction between reticence and lying on the basis of what Kant says about reticence in his correspondence with Maria von Herbert and in his other ethical writings, and defends this distinction against the objections of Rae Langton , 481–505). Lying is necessarily deceptive, whereas reticence is not necessarily deceptive. Allowing another person to remain ignorant of some matter is a form of reticence that is not deceptive. This form of reticence may be ethically permissible.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. James Edwin Mahon (2006). Kant and the Perfect Duty to Others Not to Lie. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 14 (4):653 – 685.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. James Edwin Mahon (2003). Kant on Lies, Candour and Reticence. Kantian Review 7 (1):102-133.
    Like several prominent moral philosophers before him, such as St Augustine and St Thomas Aquinas, Kant held that it is never morally permissible to tell a lie. Although a great deal has been written on why and how he argued for this conclusion, comparatively little has been written on what, precisely, Kant considered a lie to be, and on how he differentiated between being truthful and being candid, between telling a lie and being reticent, and between telling a lie and (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Laura Papish (2015). Kant on the Independence of the Moral Law From Sensibility. Kantian Review 20 (1):77-98.
    There are several senses in which Kant’s moral law is independent of sensibility. This paper is devoted mainly to Kant’s account of ‘physical conditions independence’, or the idea that the moral law can compel us to pursue ends that might be impossible to realize empirically. Since this idea has gotten little attention from commentators, this paper addresses both its textual basis in Kant’s writings and its overall philosophical viability.
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Owen Ware (2012). Review of Kant and Education: Interpretations and Commentary. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews.
    Kant and Education brings together sixteen essays by an international group of scholars. The range of topics covered in the anthology is impressive. Kant's contribution to contemporary theories of education is central, as well as Kant's intellectual debt to Rousseau, the role of education in Kant's normative theories, and the impact of Kant's ideas on subsequent generations. Add to this the relative shortness of each essay (ten to fifteen pages), and one is left with an accessible introduction to a fascinating, (...)
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation