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  1. Henry E. Allison (2002). On the Very Idea of a Propensity to Evil. Journal of Value Inquiry 36 (2-3):337-348.
  2. Gary Banham, Dennis Schulting & Nigel Hems (eds.) (2012). The Continuum Companion to Kant. Continuum.
    The first genuine and comprehensive English-language handbook to the study of Kant's philosophy, containing sections on Kant's key works, the philosophical and historical contexts of his philosophy, essays on the reception and influence of the Kantian philosophy, a lexical A-Z list of lemmata addressing central themes and concepts of Kant's thought and an extensive English-language bibliography of secondary literature.
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  3. Ian Blecher, Anil Gomes, Joel Thiago Klien, Alexei N. Krouglov, Samuel Loncar & Colin Marshall (2013). Jahresinhalt Kant-Studien. Kant-Studien 104 (4):563-566.
  4. Peter Byrne (2007). Review of Kant and the New Philosophy of Religion. [REVIEW] Religious Studies 43 (3):364-367.
  5. Matthew Caswell (2006). Kant's Conception of the Highest Good, the Gesinnung, and the Theory of Radical Evil. Kant-Studien 97 (2):184-209.
    Early in the Preface to Religion within the Limits of Reason Alone, Kant claims that “morality leads ineluctably to religion”. This thesis is hardly an innovation of the Religion. Again and again throughout the critical corpus, Kant argues that religious belief is ethically significant, that it makes a morally meaningful difference whether an agent believes or disbelieves. And yet these claims are surely among the most doubted of Kant's positions – and they are often especially doubted by readers who consider (...)
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  6. Andrew Chignell (2010). The Devil, The Virgin, and the Envoy: Symbols of Moral Struggle in Religion II.2. In Otfried Hoeffe (ed.), Klassiker Auslegen: Religion innerhalb der Grenzen der blossen. Akademie Verlag.
    Part of a group commentary on Kant's Religion book. -/- .
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  7. Andrew Chignell (2006). Review: Moore, Noble in Reason, Infinite in Faculty: Themes and Varitation in Kant's Moral and Religious Philosophy. [REVIEW] Philosophical Review 115 (1):118-121.
  8. James Collins (1977). Functions of Kant's Philosophy of Religion. The Monist 60 (2):157-180.
  9. Adina Davidovich (1994). How to Read Religion Within the Limits of Reason Alone. Kant-Studien 85 (1):1-14.
  10. Hent de Vries (1999). Philosophy and the Turn to Religion. Johns Hopkins University Press.
    If religion once seemed to have played out its role in the intellectual and political history of Western secular modernity, it has now returned with a vengeance. In this engaging study, Hent de Vries argues that a turn to religion discernible in recent philosophy anticipates and accompanies this development in the contemporary world. Though the book reaches back to Immanuel Kant, Martin Heidegger, and earlier, it takes its inspiration from the tradition of French phenomenology, notably Emmanuel Levinas, Jean-Luc Marion, and, (...)
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  11. Lara Denis (2003). Kant's Criticism of Atheism. Kant-Studien 94 (2):198-219.
    Although Kant argues that morality is prior to and independent of religion, Kant nevertheless claims that religion of a certain sort (“moral theism”) follows from morality, and that atheism poses threats to morality. Kant criticizes atheism as morally problematic in four ways: atheism robs the atheist of springs for moral action, leads the atheist to moral despair, corrupts the atheist’s moral character, and has a pernicious influence on the atheist’s community. I argue that Kant is right to say that moral (...)
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  12. Michel Despland (1973). Kant on History and Religion. Montreal,Mcgill-Queen's University Press.
  13. George Di Giovanni (2005). Freedom and Religion in Kant and His Immediate Successors: The Vocation of Humankind, 1774-1800. Cambridge University Press.
    The theologians of the late German Enlightenment saw in Kant's Critique of Pure Reason a new rational defense of their Christian faith. In fact, Kant's critical theory of meaning and moral law totally subverted the spirit of that faith. This challenging new study examines the contribution made by the Critique of Pure Reason to this change of meaning. George di Giovanni stresses the revolutionary character of Kant's critical thought but also reveals how this thought was being held hostage to unwarranted (...)
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  14. James DiCenso (2012). Kant's Religion Within the Boundaries of Mere Reason: A Commentary. Cambridge University Press.
    Machine generated contents note: Acknowledgments; Abbreviations; 1. Introductory: religion through the lens of practical reason; 2. Kant's prefaces to the first and second editions; 3. Religion part one: concerning the indwelling of the evil principle alongside the good, or, of the radical evil in human nature; 4. Religion part two: concerning the battle of the good against the evil principle for dominion over the human being; 5. Religion part three: the victory of the good principle over the evil principle, and (...)
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  15. James DiCenso (2011). Kant, Religion, and Politics. Cambridge University Press.
    Machine generated contents note: 1. Introduction: on religion, ethics, and the political in Kant; 2. Religion, politics, enlightenment; 3. Knowledge and experience; 4. Illusions of metaphysics and theology; 5. Autonomy and judgment in Kant's ethics; 6. Ethics and politics in Kant's religion.
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  16. Samuel Duncan (2011). “There is None Righteous”: Kant on the Hang Zum Bösen and the Universal Evil of Humanity. Southern Journal of Philosophy 49 (2):137-163.
    This paper offers a new interpretation of the propensity to evil and its relation to Kant's claim that the human race is universally evil. Unlike most of its competitors, the interpretation presented here neither trivializes Kant's claims about the universal evil of humanity nor attributes a position to him that is incompatible with his repeated insistence that we are blameworthy for actions only when we could have acted differently. This interpretation also accounts for a number of otherwise bewildering claims in (...)
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  17. F. E. England (1935). Review: Greene & Hudson, Immanuel Kant's Religion Within the Limits of Reason Alone. [REVIEW] Philosophy 10 (37):100-.
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  18. Alex Englander (2011). Kant's Aesthetic Theology: Revelation as Symbolisation in the Critical Philosophy. Neue Zeitschrift für Systematische Theologie Und Religionsphilosophie 53 (3):303-317.
    This essay seeks to ascertain the philosophical status of revelation in Kant's critical philosophy so as to come to a better understanding of the use of Scripture in his religious writings, especially Religion within the Boundaries of Reason Alone . In doing so it remains faithful to Kant's hermeneutic strictures according to which the bible must be expounded according to morality, in the sense of the categorical imperative, and its attendant pure practical postulates. Taking as clues Kant's repeated insistence in (...)
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  19. Chris L. Firestone (2012). A Response to Critics of In Defense of Kant's Religion. Faith and Philosophy 29 (2):193-209.
    This essay replies to four critics of In Defense of Kant’s Religion (IDKR). In reply to Gordon E. Michalson, Jr., I argue that the best pathway for understanding Kant’s Religion within the Boundaries of Mere Reason (Religion) is to conduct close textual analysis rather than giving up the art of interpretation or allowing meta-considerations surrounding Kant’s personal and political circumstances to govern one’s interpretation. In response to George di Giovanni, I contend that his critique is dismissive of theologically robust readings (...)
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  20. Chris L. Firestone (2009). Kant and Theology at the Boundaries of Reason. Ashgate.
    This book examines the transcendental dimension of Kant's philosophy as a positive resource for theology.
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  21. Paul Formosa (2011). Review: Anderson-Gold & Muchnik (Eds), Kant's Anatomy of Evil. [REVIEW] Kantian Review 16 (1):150-156.
  22. Paul Formosa (2007). Kant on the Radical Evil of Human Nature. Philosophical Forum 38 (3):221–245.
    In ‘Religion within the Boundaries of Mere Reason’ Kant presents his thesis that human nature is ‘radically evil’. To be radically evil is to have a propensity toward moral frailty, impurity and even perversity. Kant claims that all humans are ‘by nature’ radically evil. By presenting counter-examples of moral saints, I argue that not all humans are morally corrupt, even if most are. Even so, the possibility of moral failure is central to what makes us human.
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  23. Roe Fremstedal (2011). The Concept of the Highest Good in Kierkegaard and Kant. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 69 (3):155-171.
    This article tries to make sense of the concept of the highest good (eternal bliss) in Søren Kierkegaard by comparing it to the analysis of the highest good found in Immanuel Kant. The comparison with Kant’s more systematic analysis helps us clarify the meaning and importance of the concept in Kierkegaard as well as to shed new light on the conceptual relation between Kant and Kierkegaard. The article argues that the concept of the highest good is of systematic importance in (...)
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  24. R. Z. Friedman (1986). Kant and Kierkegaard: The Limits of Reason and the Cunning of Faith. [REVIEW] International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 19 (1/2):3 - 22.
  25. Emil Fromm (1899). Zur Vorgeschichte der Königlichen Kabinetsordre an Kant vom 1. Oktober 1794. Kant-Studien 3 (1-3):142-147.
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  26. Georg Geismann (2000). Sittlichkeit, Religion und Geschichte in der Philosophie Kants. Jahrbuch für Recht Und Ethik 8:437-531.
  27. Robert Gressis (2009). Chris L. Firestone, Nathan Jacobs, in Defense of Kant's Religion. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 66 (3):167-171.
  28. Matthew C. Halteman (2002). Toward a Continental Philosophy of Religion: Derrida, Responsibility, and Non-Dogmatic Faith. In Philip Goodchild (ed.), Rethinking Philosophy of Religion: Approaches from Continental Philosophy. Fordham University Press.
    From its inception in Kant's efforts to articulate a "religion within the limits of reason alone," the Continental tradition has maintained a strict division of labor between theological and philosophical reflection on religion. In what follows, I examine this continental legacy in the context of Jacques Derrida's recent work on the concept of responsibility. First I discuss three guiding themes (the limits of speculative analysis, the idea of nondogmatic religion, and the importance of the other) that characterize the continental tradition's (...)
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  29. J. E. Hare (1996). The Moral Gap: Kantian Ethics, Human Limits, and God's Assistance. Oxford University Press.
    Is morality too difficult for human beings? Kant said that it was, except with God's assistance. Contemporary moral philosophers have usually discussed the question without reference to Christian doctrine, and have either diminished the moral demand, exaggerated human moral capacity, or tried to find a substitute in nature for God's assistance. This book looks at these philosophers--from Kant and Kierkegaard to Swinburne, Russell, and R.M. Hare--and the alternative in Christianity.
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  30. John Hare (2011). Kant, The Passions, and The Structure of Moral Motivation. Faith and Philosophy 28 (1):54-70.
    This paper is an account of Kant’s view of the passions, and their place in the structure of moral motivation. The paper lays out the relations Kant sees be­tween feelings, inclinations, affects and passions, by looking at texts in Metaphysics of Morals, Religion within the Boundaries of Mere Reason, Anthropology, and Lectures on Education. Then it discusses a famous passage in Groundwork about sympathetic inclination, and ends by proposing two ways in which Kant thinks feelings and inclinations enter into moral (...)
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  31. John E. Hare (2011). Ethics and Religion: Two Kantian Arguments. Philosophical Investigations 34 (2):151-168.
    This paper describes and defends two arguments connecting ethics and religion that Kant makes in Religion within the Boundaries of Mere Reason. The first argument is that the moral demand is too high for us in our natural capacities, and God's assistance is required to bridge the resulting moral gap. The second argument is that because humans desire to be happy as well as to be morally good, morality will be rationally unstable without belief in a God who can bring (...)
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  32. John E. Hare (1994). Review: Rossi & Wreen (Eds), Kant's Philosophy of Religion Reconsidered. [REVIEW] Faith and Philosophy 11 (1):138-144.
  33. Kevin Hart (2002). Review of Hent de Vries, Religion and Violence: Philosophical Perspectives From Kant to Derrida. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2002 (10).
  34. David James (2011). Review: Fichte, Attempt at a Critique of All Revelation. [REVIEW] Kantian Review 16 (2):315-317.
  35. Patrick Kain (2005). Interpreting Kant's Theory of Divine Commands. Kantian Review 9 (1):128-149.
    Several interpretive disagreements about Kant's theory of divine commands (esp. in the work of Allen Wood and John E. Hare) can be resolved with further attention to Kant's works. It is argued that Kant's moral theism included (at least until 1797) the claim that practical reason, reflecting upon the absolute authority of the moral law, should lead finite rational beings like us to believe that there exists an omnipotent, omniscient and holy being who commands our obedience to the moral law (...)
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  36. Immanuel Kant (1998). Religion Within the Boundaries of Mere Reason and Other Writings. Cambridge University Press.
    Religion within the Boundaries of Mere Reason is a key element of the system of philosophy which Kant introduced with his Critique of Pure Reason, and a work of major importance in the history of Western religious thought. It represents a great philosopher's attempt to spell out the form and content of a type of religion that would be grounded in moral reason and would meet the needs of ethical life. It includes sharply critical and boldly constructive discussions on topics (...)
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  37. Immanuel Kant (1996). Religion and Rational Theology. Cambridge University Press.
    This volume collects for the first time in a single volume all of Kant's writings on religion and rational theology. These works were written during a period of conflict between Kant and the Prussian authorities over his religious teachings. His final statement of religion was made after the death of King Frederick William II in 1797. The historical context and progression of this conflict are charted in the general introduction to the volume and in the translators' introductions to particular texts. (...)
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  38. Immanuel Kant (1960). Religion Within the Limits of Reason Alone. New York,Harper.
  39. Beryl Logan (1998). Hume and Kant on Knowing the Deity. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 43 (3):133-148.
  40. D. M. MacKinnon (1975). Kant's Philosophy of Religion. Philosophy 50 (192):131 - 144.
    This paper is concerned with kant's "religion within the bounds of reason" alone in relation to major writings of his critical period. The originality and subtlety of kant's scrutiny of certain theological doctrines, E.G., Redemption and grace was brought out from the text, And the relation of kant's "religious philosophy" to elements in the "critique of pure reason" and the "critique of judgment", That show sympathy with the tradition of negative theology.
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  41. Jacqueline Mariña (2001). Kant and the Problem of God, Gordon E. Michalson. [REVIEW] Modern Theology 17 (3):395-397.
  42. Jacqueline Mariña (1997). Kant on Grace: A Reply to His Critics. Religious Studies 33 (4):379-400.
    Against those who dismiss Kant's project in the "Religion" because it provides a Pelagian understanding of salvation, this paper offers an analysis of the deep structure of Kant's views on divine justice and grace showing them not to conflict with an authentically Christian understanding of these concepts. The first part of the paper argues that Kant's analysis of these concepts helps us to understand the necessary conditions of the Christian understanding of grace: unfolding them uncovers intrinsic relations holding between God's (...)
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  43. Jacqueline Mariña & West Lafayette (2000). Making Sense of Kant's Highest Good. Kant-Studien 91 (3):329-355.
    This paper explores Kant's concept of the highest good and the postulate of the existence of God arising from it. Kant has two concepts of the highest good standing in tension with one another, an immanent and a transcendent one. I provide a systematic exposition of the constituents of both variants and show how Kant’s arguments are prone to confusion through a conflation of both concepts. I argue that once these confusions are sorted out Kant’s claim regarding the need to (...)
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  44. Gordon E. Michalson (1997). The Problem of Salvation in Kant's Religion Within the Limits of Reason Alone. International Philosophical Quarterly 37 (3):319-328.
  45. Gordon E. Michalson (1990). Fallen Freedom: Kant on Radical Evil and Moral Regeneration. Cambridge University Press.
    This work offers a clear exposition of evil and moral regeneration as they appear in Kant's late work Religion Within the Limits of Reason Alone. Michalson examines a doctrine of "radical evil" which he sees as strongly resembling the Christian doctrine of original sin. In the author's view, Kant compromises his position as a result of this throwback to the Christian tradition, which is at odds with some of the basic tenets of the Enlightenment. Kant is thus seen to be (...)
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  46. A. W. Moore (2003). Noble in Reason, Infinite in Faculty: Themes and Variations in Kant's Moral and Religious Philosophy. Routledge.
    In this bold and innovative new work, Adrian Moore provides a refreshing but challenging new interpretation of Kant's moral philosophy and argues that it can enrich our understanding of a central problem in contemporary ethical debate: the problem of rationality. Noble in Reason, Infinite in Faculty is essential reading for all those interested in Kant, ethics and philosophy of religion.
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  47. Seiriol Morgan (2005). The Missing Formal Proof of Humanity's Radical Evil in Kant's Religion. Philosophical Review 114 (1):63-114.
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  48. Pablo Muchnik (forthcoming). Review: Michalson (Ed), “Kant’s Religious Constructivism,” in The Critical Companion to Religion Within the Boundaries of Mere Reason. Cambridge University Press.
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  49. Pablo Muchnik (2013). Review: DiCenso, Kant's Religion Within the Boundaries of Mere Reason: A Commentary. [REVIEW] International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 73 (2):151-155.
  50. Pablo Muchnik (2009). Kant's Theory of Evil: An Essay on the Dangers of Self-Love and the Aprioricity of History. Lexington Books.
    An Essay on Kant s Theory of Evil shows the centrality of the doctrine of radical evil within Kant's critical philosophy.
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