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  1. Bruno Accarino (1994). Ingiustizia E Storia: Il Tempo E Il Male Tra Kant E Weber. Editori Riuniti.
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  2. Ian Adams (1990). Kant, Pestalozzi and the Role of Ideology in Educational Thought. Journal of Philosophy of Education 24 (2):257–269.
  3. Guido Antônio Almeiddea (2006). Sobre o Princípio E a Lei Universal Do Direito Em Kant. Kriterion: Journal of Philosophy 47 (114):209-222.
  4. Matthew C. Altman (2007). The Decomposition of the Corporate Body: What Kant Cannot Contribute to Business Ethics. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 74 (3):253 - 266.
    Kant is gaining popularity in business ethics because the categorical imperative rules out actions such as deceptive advertising and exploitative working conditions, both of which treat people merely as means to an end. However, those who apply Kant in this way often hold businesses themselves morally accountable, and this conception of collective responsibility contradicts the kind of moral agency that underlies Kant's ethics. A business has neither inclinations nor the capacity to reason, so it lacks the conditions necessary for constraint (...)
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  5. Sharon Anderson-Gold (1998). Review: Schott (Ed), Feminist Interpretations of Immanuel Kant. [REVIEW] Kantian Review 2 (1):155-157.
  6. Hannah Arendt (1982). Lectures on Kant's Political Philosophy. University of Chicago Press.
    The present volume brings Arendt's notes for these lectures together with other of her texts on the topic of judging and provides important clues to the likely direction of Arendt's thinking in this area.
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  7. Richard E. Ashcroft (2003). Kant, Mill, Durkheim? Trust and Autonomy in Bioethics and Politics. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 34 (2):359-366.
  8. Dennis Vanden Auweele (2013). The Lutheran Influence on Kant's Depraved Will. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 73 (2):117-134.
    Contemporary Kant-scholarship has a tendency to allign Kant’s understanding of depravity closer to Erasmus than Luther in their famous debate on the freedom of the will (1520–1527). While, at face value, some paragraphs do warrant such a claim, I will argue that Kant’s understanding of the radical evil will draws closer to Luther than Erasmus in a number of elements. These elements are (1) the intervention of the Wille for progress towards the good, (2) a positive choice for evil, (3) (...)
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  9. Dennis Vanden Auweele (2012). The Enduring Relevance of Kant's Analysis of (Radical) Evil. Bijdragen 73 (2):121-142.
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  10. Thomas Auxter (1979). The Unimportance of Kant's Highest Good. Journal of the History of Philosophy 17 (2):121-134.
  11. Diana E. Axelsen (1989). Kant's Metaphors for Persons and Community. Philosophy and Theology 3 (4):301-321.
    I argue that, although it is probably not possible to construct a thoroughly consistent interpretation of Kantian metaphors, there is a perspective in Kant’s later writings which provides a framework for selecting and sorting central metaphors. Following a discussion of the work or Lakoff and Johnson on metaphor, I provide an examination of Kant’s distinction between noumenon and phenomenon as an example of a metaphor grounded upon spatio-temporal experience, and conclude with suggestions concerning the role of metaphor in Kant’s account (...)
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  12. Sidney Axinn (1981). Ambivalence: Kant's View of Human Nature. Kant-Studien 72 (1-4):169-174.
  13. Johannes Balthasar (1983). Spirit and Revolution. Studies in Kant, Hegel, and Marx. Philosophy and History 16 (1):26-27.
  14. G. Banham (2002). Kant's Critique of Right. Kantian Review 6 (1):35-59.
    Full-text of this article is not available in this e-prints service. This article was originally published [following peer-review] in Kantian Review, published by and copyright University of Wales Press.
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  15. Anne Barron (2012). Kant, Copyright and Communicative Freedom. Law and Philosophy 31 (1):1-48.
    The rapid recent expansion of copyright law worldwide has sparked efforts to defend the ‘public domain’ of non-propertized information, often on the ground that an expansive public domain is a condition of a ‘free culture’. Yet questions remain about why the public domain is worth defending, what exactly a free culture is, and what role (if any) authors’ rights might play in relation to it. From the standard liberal perspective shared by many critics of copyright expansionism, the protection of individual (...)
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  16. Pierluigi Barrotta (1998). Parsons on Mises and Kant: A Comment. Economics and Philosophy 14 (1):127.
  17. Peter Baumanns (2007). Die Seele-Staat-Analogie Im Blick Auf Platon, Kant Und Schiller. Königshausen & Neumann.
  18. Gunnar Beck (2006). Immanuel Kant's Theory of Rights. Ratio Juris 19 (4):371-401.
  19. Allan Beever (2013). Kant on the Law of Marriage. Kantian Review 18 (3):339-362.
    The account of marriage Kant presents in the Rechtslehre strikes most readers as cold, legalistic and obsessed with sex. It seems to ignore at least nearly all of the morally valuable aspects of marriage. Consequently, most have felt that this is a feature of Kant 's theory best ignored. Against this view, this article argues that Kant 's focus is appropriate, that his understanding of marriage is much more romantic than is commonly thought and that it presents a thought-provoking alternative (...)
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  20. Robert Bernasconi (2003). Will the Real Kant Please Stand Up-The Challenge of Enlightenment Racism to the Study of the History of Philosophy. Radical Philosophy 117:13-22.
  21. Jürgen Blühdorn (1973). „Kantianer“ und Kant. Die Wende von der Rechtsmetaphysik zur „Wissenschaft“ vom positiven Recht. Kant-Studien 64 (1-4):363-394.
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  22. Michael Boesch (2007). Global Rational. On the Cosmopolitanism of the Kant's Rational Critique. Kant-Studien 98 (4):473-486.
  23. Ken Booth (2002). Review: Orend, War and International Justice: A Kantian Perspective. [REVIEW] Kantian Review 6 (1):144-149.
  24. Maurizio Borghi, The Public Use of Reason: A Philosophical Understanding of Knowledge Sharing.
    Free access to knowledge and knowledge-sharing are among the most relevant claims of the so called "knowledge society", whose beginnings can be find out in the Age of Enlightenment (18th Century). As a matter of fact, in the thinking of Immanuel Kant these claims are explicitly assumed in a philosophical perspective. Thus, the need of sharing knowledge, and in general the need of freedom in the communication of thinking, is not merely held as self evident or just empirically given: on (...)
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  25. Nick Bostrom, R. C. W. Ettinger & Charles Tandy (eds.) (2004). Death and Anti-Death, Volume 2: Two Hundred Years After Kant, Fifty Years After Turing. Palo Alto: Ria University Press.
  26. Henry Walter Branr (1977). On the Comprehension and Evaluation of Kant in Our Time. Contributions of Marxist-Leninist Kant Research. Philosophy and History 10 (2):152-155.
  27. Daniel Breazeale (2008). Review: Henrich, Between Kant and Hegel. Lectures on German Idealism. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Philosophy 46 (2):pp. 330-331.
    As the author explains, the title of this work is intended to distinguish it from ordinary, Whiggish accounts of the development of German philosophy “from Kant to Hegel.” Instead, Heinrich treats the positions of Kant, Fichte, and Hegel as potentially viable alternatives, none of which must be viewed as aufgehoben by those that followed, and all of which deserve reconsideration by contemporary philosophers.Dieter Henrich is known for two things: first, for championing a minutely-detailed, revisionist approach to the history of post-Kantian (...)
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  28. Klaus Brinkmann (ed.) (2007). German Idealism: Critical Concepts in Philosophy. Routledge.
    v. 1. The Enlightenment, Kant -- v. 2. Kant's immediate critics, Early German romanticism -- v. 3. General characterization, Fichte, Schelling, Hegel -- v. 4. New horizons, The legacy of German idealism.
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  29. Thom Brooks (2005). Kantian Punishment and Retributivism: A Reply to Clark. Ratio 18 (2):237–245.
    In this journal, Michael Clark defends a "A Non-Retributive Kantian Approach to Punishment". I argue that both Kant's and Rawls's theories of punishment are retributivist to some extent. It may then be slightly misleading to say that by following the views of Kant and Rawls, in particular, as Clark does, we can develop a nonretributivist theory of punishment. This matter is further complicated by the fact Clark nowhere addresses Rawls's views on punishment: Rawls endorses a mixed theory combining retributive and (...)
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  30. Antonio Calcagno (1995). Interface: Modernity and Post-Modernity: The Possibility of Enthusiasm According to Immanuel Kant and Jean-Francois Lyotard. Philosophy Today 4 (4):358-370.
  31. Anthony J. Carroll (2009). Review: Ripstein (Ed), Immanuel Kant (International Library of Essays in the History of Social and Political Thought). [REVIEW] Heythrop Journal 50 (2):339-340.
  32. Georg Cavallar (2014). Sources of Kant's Cosmopolitanism: Basedow, Rousseau, and Cosmopolitan Education. Studies in Philosophy and Education 33 (4):369-389.
    The goal of this essay is to analyse the influence of Johann Bernhard Basedow and Rousseau on Kant’s cosmopolitanism and concept of cosmopolitan education. It argues that both Basedow and Kant defined cosmopolitan education as non-denominational moral formation or Bildung, encompassing—in different forms—a thin version of moral religion following the core tenets of Christianity. Kant’s encounter with Basedow and the Philanthropinum in Dessau helps to understand the development of Kant’s concept of cosmopolitanism and educational theory ‘in weltbürgerlicher Absicht’. Rousseau’s role (...)
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  33. Georg Cavallar (2012). Review: Roth and Surprenant, Kant and Education: Interpretations and Commentary. [REVIEW] Kantian Review 17 (3):527-530.
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  34. Georg Cavallar (2012). Review: Roth & Surprenant (Eds), Kant and Education: Interpretations and Commentary. [REVIEW] Kantian Review 17 (3):527-530.
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  35. Georg Cavallar (2010). Review of B. Sharon Byrd, Joachim Hruschka, Kant's Doctrine of Right: A Commentary. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2010 (8).
  36. Georg Cavallar (2010). Review: Erskine, Embedded Cosmopolitanism. Duties to Strangers and Enemies in a World of 'Dislocated Communities'. [REVIEW] Kantian Review 14 (2):153-155.
  37. Georg Cavallar (1999). Kant and the Theory and Practice of International Right. University of Wales Press.
    This innovative study focuses on the Kantian theory of international relations, a subject which has frequently been either ignored or misunderstood. Kant was criticized by contemporaries who asserted that his political ideas were idealistic and impractical. He countered this accusation by evolving a political philosophy which formed a link between the theoretical doctrine of pure law and the actualities of the real world. The author argues that Kant’s theory of international relations can be read as an attempt to bring reason (...)
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  38. Georg Cavallar (1994). Kant's Society of Nations: Free Federation or World Republic? Journal of the History of Philosophy 32 (3):461-482.
  39. Georg Cavallar & August Reinisch (1998). Kant, Intervention and the 'Failed State'. Kantian Review 2 (1):91-106.
    Nowadays Kant's practical philosophy is as highly regarded as his theoretical philosophy. This is an important development since the more constructive side of Kant's philosophy is to be found in his moral and political works. The main task of the Critique of Pure Reason is to clarify its concepts and to get rid of basic errors, and thus only ‘negative’. The moral and political writings, on the other hand, try to expand the scope of reason ‘for practical purposes’ . Establishing (...)
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  40. Mark D. Chapman (1998). Why the Enlightenment Project Doesn't Have to Fail. Heythrop Journal 39 (4):379–393.
    Ever since the publication of MacIntyre's After Virtue, the ‘Enlightenment Project’, where morality was uprooted from its traditional context and where human reason reigned supreme, has been regarded as doomed to failure. This view has been shared by a large number of theologians, but it is based on a misrepresentation of the Enlightenment, one strand of which sought to set limits to human reason. In particular, Immanuel Kant, who is discussed in detail, believed in the principle of perpetual criticism, a (...)
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  41. Andrea Ciceri (2011). The Reading of Radical Evil in Kant Proposed by Italo Mancini. Rivista di Filosofia Neo-Scolastica 103 (4):691-705.
    The contribution examines Italo Mancini'suggestion to reread Kant's radical evil in the light of a reconsideration of the scope of reason in Kant's philosophy of religion.
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  42. Alix Cohen (ed.) (2014). Kant's Lectures on Anthropology: A Critical Guide. Cambridge University Press.
    Kant's lectures on anthropology, which formed the basis of his Anthropology from a Pragmatic Point of View, contain many observations on human nature, culture and psychology and illuminate his distinctive approach to the human sciences. The essays in the present volume, written by an international team of leading Kant scholars, offer the first comprehensive scholarly assessment of these lectures, their philosophical importance, their evolution and their relation to Kant's critical philosophy. They explore a wide range of topics, including Kant's account (...)
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  43. J. Angelo Corlett (1993). Foundations of a Kantian Theory of Punishment. Southern Journal of Philosophy 31 (3):263-283.
    It has recently been argued that there is probably no theory of punishment to be found in Immanuel Kant’s writings, but that “if one selects carefully among the many remarks and insights that Kant has left us about crime and punishment, one might even be able to build such an edifice from the bricks provided.” In this paper, I seek to provide part of a foundation of a Kantian theory of punishment, one which is consistent with many, if not all, (...)
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  44. Timothy M. Costelloe (2006). Kant and the Culture of Enlightenment (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 44 (4):667-668.
    Timothy M. Costelloe - Kant and the Culture of Enlightenment - Journal of the History of Philosophy 44:4 Journal of the History of Philosophy 44.4 667-668 Muse Search Journals This Journal Contents Reviewed by Timothy M. Costelloe The College of William and Mary Katerina Deligiorgi. Kant and the Culture of Enlightenment. Albany, New York: SUNY Press, 2005. Pp. xi + 248. Cloth, $70.00. At a time when our attention is overwhelmed by the practical manifestations of power in pursuit of personal, (...)
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  45. Charles Covell (2006). Review: Williams, Kant's Critique of Hobbes: Sovereignty and Cosmopolitanism. [REVIEW] Kantian Review 11:130-133.
  46. P. J. Crittenden (1987). Kant as Educationist. Philosophical Studies 31:11-32.
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  47. Ciaran Cronin (2003). Kant's Politics of Enlightenment. Journal of the History of Philosophy 41 (1):51-80.
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  48. Lisa Curtis-Wendlandt (2012). No Right to Resist? Elise Reimarus's "Freedom" as a Kantian Response to the Problem of Violent Revolt. Hypatia 27 (4):755 - 773.
    One of the greatest woman intellectuals of eighteenth-century Germany is Elise Reimarus, whose contribution to Enlightenment political theory is rarely acknowledged today. Unlike other social contract theorists, Reimarus rejects a people's right to violent resistance or revolution in her philosophical dialogue Freedom (1791). Exploring the arguments in Freedom, this paper observes a number of similarities in the political thought of Elise Reimarus and Immanuel Kant. Both, I suggest, reject violence as an illegitimate response to perceived political injustice in a way (...)
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  49. Daniel O. Dahlstrom (1985). The Natural Right of Equal Opportunity in Kant's Civil Union. Southern Journal of Philosophy 23 (3):295-303.
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  50. Fred R. Dallmayr (1988). Between Kant and Aristotle: Beiner's Political Judgment. New Vico Studies 6:147-154.
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