This category needs an editor. We encourage you to help if you are qualified.
Volunteer, or read more about what this involves.
Related categories
Siblings:
28 found
Search inside:
(import / add options)   Sort by:
  1. Ingrid Bauer-Drevermann (1965). Der Begriff der Zufälligkeit in der Kritik der Urteilskraft. Kant-Studien 56 (3-4):497-504.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Claus Beisbart (2009). Kant's Characterization of Natural Ends. Kant Yearbook 1 (1).
  3. Ken Booth (2002). Review: Orend, War and International Justice: A Kantian Perspective. [REVIEW] Kantian Review 6:144-149.
  4. Luigi Caranti (2005). Logical Purposiveness and the Principle of Taste. Kant-Studien 96 (3):364-374.
    In both Introductions to the Critique of Judgment Kant seems to identify the a priori principle at the basis of aesthetic judgments with the principle that guides reflective judgment in its cognitive inquiry of nature, i.e. the purposiveness of nature or systematicity. For instance Kant writes.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Clive Cazeaux (2001). Review: Banham, Kant and the Ends of Aesthetics. [REVIEW] Kantian Review 5:141-147.
  6. Clive Cazeaux (2001). Review: Banham, Kant and the Ends of Aesthetics. Kantian Review 5:141.
  7. Clive Cazeaux (2001). Review: Banham, Kant and the Ends of Aesthetics. [REVIEW] Kantian Review 5 (1):141-147.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Willem A. deVries (1991). The Dialectic of Teleology. Philosophical Topics 19 (2):51-70.
  9. Hannah Ginsborg (2006). Aesthetic Judgment and Perceptual Normativity. Inquiry 49 (5):403 – 437.
    I draw a connection between the question, raised by Hume and Kant, of how aesthetic judgments can claim universal agreement, and the question, raised in recent discussions of nonconceptual content, of how concepts can be acquired on the basis of experience. Developing an idea suggested by Kant's linkage of aesthetic judgment with the capacity for empirical conceptualization, I propose that both questions can be resolved by appealing to the idea of "perceptual normativity". Perceptual experience, on this proposal, involves the awareness (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Hannah Ginsborg (2006). Thinking the Particular as Contained Under the Universal. In Rebecca Kukla (ed.), Aesthetics and Cognition in Kant's Critical Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.
    In a well-known passage from the Introduction to Kant’s Critique of Judgment, Kant defines the power or faculty of judgment [Urteilskraft] as "the capacity to think the particular as contained under the universal" (Introduction IV, 5:179).1 He then distinguishes two ways in which this faculty can be exercised, namely as determining or as reflecting. These two ways are defined as follows: "If the universal (the rule, the principle, the law) is given, then judgment, which subsumes the particular under it... is (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Hannah Ginsborg (2003). Aesthetic Judging and the Intentionality of Pleasure. Inquiry 46 (2):164 – 181.
    I point out some unclarities in Allison's interpretation of Kant's aesthetic theory, specifically in his account of the free play of the faculties. I argue that there is a tension between Allison's commitment to the intentionality of the pleasure involved in a judgment of beauty, and his view that the pleasure is distinct from the judgment, and I claim that the tension should be resolved by rejecting the latter view. I conclude by addressing Allison's objection that my own view fails (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Hannah Ginsborg (1990). Reflective Judgment and Taste. Noûs 24 (1):63-78.
  13. Fiona Hughes (2006). On Aesthetic Judgement and Our Relation to Nature: Kant's Concept of Purposiveness. Inquiry 49 (6):547-572.
    I offer a critical reconstruction of Kant's thesis that aesthetic judgement is founded on the principle of the purposiveness of nature. This has been taken as equivalent to the claim that aesthetics is directly linked to the systematicity of nature in its empirical laws. I take issue both with Henry Allison, who seeks to marginalize this claim, and with Avner Baz, who highlights it in order to argue that Kant's aesthetics are merely instrumental for his epistemology. My solution is that (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Klaus E. Kaehler (1992). Comment on Henry E. Allison: Kant's Antinomy of Teleological Judgment. Southern Journal of Philosophy 30 (S1):43-48.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Patrick Paul Kain (1999). Review: Reath, Herman, Korsgaard (Ed), Reclaiming the History of Ethics: Essays for John Rawls. [REVIEW] Kantian Review 3:114-122.
  16. Immanuel Kant (1928). Kant's Critique of Teleological Judgement. Oxford, the Clarendon Press.
  17. Jean-François Lyotard (1994). Lessons on the Analytic of the Sublime: Kant's Critique of Judgment, [Sections] 23-29. Stanford University Press.
    Philosophical aesthetics have seen an amazing revival over the past decade, as a radical questioning of the very grounds of Western epistemology has revealed that descriptions of what used to be seen as specific to aesthetic experience can instead be viewed as a general model for human cognition. In this revival, no text in the classical corpus of Western philosophy has been more frequently discussed and debated than the dense, complex paragraphs inserted into Kant's Critique of Judgment as sections 23-29: (...)
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. John D. McFarland (1970). Kant's Concept of Teleology. [Edinburgh]University of Edinburgh Press.
  19. Jeffrey Reid (2002). Review: Dumouchel, Kant et la genèse de la subjectivité esthétique. Esthétique et philosophie avant la Critique de la faculté de juger. [REVIEW] Dialogue 41 (04):814-.
  20. Thomas Teufel (2011). Kant's Non -Teleological Conception of Purposiveness. Kant-Studien 102 (2):232-252.
    In this paper I argue, first, that Kant's technical definition of purposiveness in § 10 of the third Critique is designed to abstract from all forward-looking considerations (teleological, intentional, normative, etc.) that accompany the conventional understanding of the term. Kant seeks to establish a strictly backward-looking, etiological conception of purposiveness in order to capture the causal link connecting artifacts with their concepts. I argue, second, that he succeeds. Kant's etiological conception of purposiveness neither collapses into mere mechanism, nor smuggles normative (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Thomas Teufel (2002). An Introduction to Kant's Critique of Judgment. British Journal of Aesthetics 42 (2):216-219.
  22. Robert Wicks (2007). Routledge Philosophy Guidebook to Kant on Judgment. Routledge.
    Kant’s Critique of Judgment is one of the most important texts in the history of modern aesthetics. This GuideBook discusses the third Critique section by section, and introduces and assesses: Kant's life and the background of the Critique of Judgment the ideas and text of the Critique of Judgment , including a critical explanation of Kant’s theories of natural beauty The continuing relevance of Kant’s work to contemporary philosophy and aesthetics This GuideBook is an accessible introduction to a notoriously difficult (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Rachel Zuckert (2007). Kant on Beauty and Biology: An Interpretation of the Critique of Judgment. Cambridge University Press.
    Kant's Critique of Judgment has often been interpreted by scholars as comprising separate treatments of three uneasily connected topics: beauty, biology, and empirical knowledge. Rachel Zuckert's book is the first to interpret the Critique as a unified argument concerning all three domains. She argues that on Kant's view, human beings demonstrate a distinctive cognitive ability in appreciating beauty and understanding organic life: an ability to anticipate a whole that we do not completely understand according to preconceived categories. This ability is (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Rachel Zuckert (2007). Kant's Rationalist Aesthetics. Kant-Studien 98 (4):443-463.
    It is quite standard, even banal, to describe Kant's project in the Critique of Pure Reason [KrV] as a critical reconciliation of rationalism and empiricism, most directly expressed in Kant's claim that intuitions and concepts are two distinct, yet equally necessary, and necessarily interdependent sources of cognition. Similarly, though Kant rejects both the rationalist foundation of morality in the concept of perfection and that of the empiricists in feeling or in the moral sense, one might broadly characterize Kant's moral philosophy (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Rachel Zuckert (2006). The Purposiveness of Form: A Reading of Kant's Aesthetic Formalism. Journal of the History of Philosophy 44 (4):599-622.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Rachel Zuckert (2005). Boring Beauty and Universal Morality: Kant on the Ideal of Beauty. Inquiry 48 (2):107 – 130.
    This paper argues that Kant's account of the "ideal of beauty" in paragraph 17 of the Critique of Judgment is not only a plausible account of one kind of beauty ("boring" beauty), but also that it can address some of our moral qualms concerning the aesthetic evaluation of persons, including our psychological propensity to take a person's beauty to represent her moral character.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Rachel Zuckert (2003). Awe or Envy: Herder Contra Kant on the Sublime. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 61 (3):217–232.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Rachel Zuckert (2002). A New Look at Kant's Theory of Pleasure. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 60 (3):239–252.
    I argue (contra Guyer et al.) that in the Critique of Judgment Kant espouses a formal, intentional theory of pleasure, and reconstruct Kant's arguments that this view can both identify what all pleasures have in common, and differentiate among kinds of pleasure. Through his investigation of aesthetic experience in the Critique of Judgment, I argue, Kant radically departs from his views about pleasure as mere sensation in the Groundwork and the Critique of Practical Reason, and provides a view of pleasure (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation