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  1. Pedro Amaral, Humanities and the Idea of a Person in the 22nd Century: Kant, Descartes, Sellars.
    Science starts out with the idea of a person as billions of neurons housed in a body that is a cloud of particles. Common sense starts out with the idea of a person having capacities belonging to a single individual. The common sense person does not have parts. Our objectifying science slowly takes over the person as it tends toward physical materialism. Where will it end? What is being gradually pushed out of the world? If science had already taken over, (...)
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  2. Karl Ameriks (1997). Kant and the Self: A Retrospective. In David Klemm and Zöller (ed.), Figuring the Self. Suny Press. 55--72.
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  3. Richard E. Aquila (1997). Self as Matter and Form: Some Reflections on Kant’s View of the Soul. In David Klemm and Zöller (ed.), Figuring the Self. SUNY Press.
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  4. Ralf M. Bader (forthcoming). Self-Knowledge in §7 of the Transcendental Aesthetic. In Stefano Bacin (ed.), Proceedings of the XIth International Kant Kongress. de Gruyter.
    Kant's claim that time is a subjective form of intuition was first proposed in his Inaugural Dissertation. This view was immediately criticised by Schultz, Lambert and Mendelssohn. Their criticisms are based on the claim that representations change which implies that change is real. From the reality of change they then argue to the reality of time, which undermines its supposed status as a subjective form of intuition that only applies to appearances. Kant took these criticisms very seriously and attempted to (...)
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  5. Nikunja Vihari Banerjee (1974). Kant's Philosophy of the Self. Arnold-Heinemann Publishers.
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  6. Nathan Bauer (2012). A Peculiar Intuition: Kant's Conceptualist Account of Perception. Inquiry 55 (3):215-237.
    Abstract Both parties in the active philosophical debate concerning the conceptual character of perception trace their roots back to Kant's account of sensible intuition in the Critique of Pure Reason. This striking fact can be attributed to Kant's tendency both to assert and to deny the involvement of our conceptual capacities in sensible intuition. He appears to waver between these two positions in different passages, and can thus seem thoroughly confused on this issue. But this is not, in fact, the (...)
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  7. Sébastien Billioud (2006). Mou Zongsan's Problem with the Heideggerian Interpretation of Kant. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 33 (2):225–247.
    The article elucidates the modern Chinese philosopher Mou Zongsan's relation to the philosophy of Martin Heidegger. It postulates that Mou's appropriation of Immanuel Kant to build up his metaphysical system encountered one real obstacle, which was Heidegger's interpretation of the "Critique of Pure Reason" in the "Kantbuch." Heidegger and Mou both link their conceptions of the Self with understandings of ontology which are totally incompatible.
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  8. Matthew Boyle (forthcoming). Kant and the Significance of Self-Consciousness. Philosophy.
    Human beings who have mastered a natural language are self-conscious creatures: they can think, and indeed speak, about themselves in the first person. This dissertation is about the significance of this capacity: what it is and what difference it makes to our minds. My thesis is that the capacity for self-consciousness is essential to rationality, the thing that sets the minds of rational creatures apart from those of mere brutes. This, I argue, is what Kant was getting at in a (...)
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  9. Daniel Breazeale (2008). Review: Henrich, Between Kant and Hegel. Lectures on German Idealism. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Philosophy 46 (2):pp. 330-331.
  10. Andrew Brook, Kant's View of the Mind and Consciousness of Self. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
  11. Andrew Brook (1997). Unity of Consciousness and Other Mental Unities. In Proceedings of the 19th Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society. Ablex Press.
    Though there has been a huge resurgence of interest in consciousness in the past decade, little attention has been paid to what the philosopher Immanuel Kant and others call the unity of consciousness. The unity of consciousness takes different forms, as we will see, but the general idea is that each of us is aware of many things in the world at the same time, and often many of one's own mental states and of oneself as their single common subject, (...)
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  12. Andrew Brook (1994). Kant and the Mind. Cambridge University Press.
    Kant made a number of highly original discoveries about the mind - about its ability to synthesise a single, coherent representation of self and world, about the unity it must have to do so, and about the mind's awareness of itself and the semantic apparatus it uses to achieve this awareness. The past fifty years have seen intense activity in research on human cognition. Even so, Kant's discoveries have not been superseded, and some of them have not even been assimilated (...)
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  13. David Carr (1977). Kant, Husserl, and the Nonempirical Ego. Journal of Philosophy 74 (11):682-690.
  14. Quassim Cassam (1993). Inner Sense, Body Sense, and Kant's "Refutation of Idealism&Quot;. European Journal of Philosophy 1 (2):111-127.
  15. Quassim Cassam (1989). Kant and Reductionism. Review of Metaphysics 43 (September):72-106.
  16. Hector-Neri Castañeda (1988). Metaphysical Internalism, Selves, and the Invisible Noumenon (A Frego-Kantian Reflection on Descartes's Cogito). Midwest Studies in Philosophy 12 (1):129-144.
  17. Andrew Chignell (2010). Causal Refutations of Idealism. Philosophical Quarterly 60 (240):487-507.
    In the ‘Refutation of Idealism’ chapter of the first Critique, Kant argues that the conditions required for having certain kinds of mental episodes are sufficient to guarantee that there are ‘objects in space’ outside us. A perennially influential way of reading this compressed argument is as a kind of causal inference: in order for us to make justified judgements about the order of our inner states, those states must be caused by the successive states of objects in space outside us. (...)
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  18. Andrew Chignell (2004). Review of H.J. Glock (Ed), Strawson and Kant. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2004 (8).
  19. Mark T. Conard (1994). Allison's Reading of Kant's Paradox of Inner Sense. Philosophy Today 38 (3-4):317-325.
  20. D. R. Cousin (1958). Kant on the Self. Kant-Studien 49 (1-4):25-35.
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  21. Theodore di Maria Jr (2009). Is Kant's Theoretical Doctrine of the Self Consistent with His Thesis of Noumenal Ignorance? International Philosophical Quarterly 49 (1).
    The relation between the concepts of the subject of apperception, the phenomenal self, and the noumenal self has long puzzled commentators on Kant’s theoretical account of the self. This paper argues that many of the puzzles surrounding Kant’s account can be resolved by treating the subject of apperception and other transcendental predicates of thinking as a dimension of the noumenal self. Yet this interpretation requires a clarification of how the transcendental predicates of thinking can be attributed to the noumenal self (...)
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  22. Theodore Di Maria (2002). Kant's View of the Self In the First Critique. Idealistic Studies 32 (3):191-202.
    In Kant’s Transcendental Idealism, Henry Allison argues that Kant’s theoretical treatment of the self presents both an incoherent “official view” and a coherent “alternative view.” In this paper, I argue that Kant’s genuine position on the self can be reconstructed as a coherent unity by examining the flaws in Allison’s analysis. It is shown that Allison’s objections to Kant’s official view are based on unwarranted metaphysical assumptions and unjustified conceptual identifications. Allison’s own dual-aspect view of the transcendental distinction between phenomena (...)
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  23. Theodore Di Maria (2002). Kant's View of the Self In the First Critique. Idealistic Studies 32 (3):191-202.
    In Kant’s Transcendental Idealism, Henry Allison argues that Kant’s theoretical treatment of the self presents both an incoherent “official view” and a coherent “alternative view.” In this paper, I argue that Kant’s genuine position on the self can be reconstructed as a coherent unity by examining the flaws in Allison’s analysis. It is shown that Allison’s objections to Kant’s official view are based on unwarranted metaphysical assumptions and unjustified conceptual identifications. Allison’s own dual-aspect view of the transcendental distinction between phenomena (...)
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  24. Corey W. Dyck (2009). Review: Guyer, Knowledge, Reason, and Taste: Kant's Response to Hume. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Social Criticism 35 (5):613-619.
  25. Dina Emundts (2006). Die Paralogismen und die Widerlegung des Idealismus in Kants „Kritik der reinen Vernunft“. Deutsche Zeitschrift für Philosophie 54 (2/2006).
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  26. Dina Emundts, Stefanie Grüne & Ulrich Schlösser (2006). Kants Paralogismen. Deutsche Zeitschrift für Philosophie 54 (2/2006).
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  27. Sandra Jane Fairbanks (2000). Kantian Moral Theory and the Destruction of the Self. Westview Press.
    This anthology, Defining Public Administration , is designed to assist beginning and intermediate level students of public policy, and to stir the imaginations of readers concerned with public policy and administration. The forty-five articles included in the text are all reprinted from the International Encyclopedia of Public Policy and Administration , and these accessible, interesting articles have been assembled to offer a sample of the riches to be found within the larger work. The articles provide definitions of the vocabulary of (...)
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  28. Fabian Freyenhagen (2008). Reasoning Takes Time: On Allison and the Timelessness of the Intelligible Self. Kantian Review 13 (2):67-84.
    Consider the following objection of Bennett to Kant: The least swallowable part of Kant's whole theory of freedom is the claim that the causality of freedom is not in time. This follows from Kant's doctrine that time is an appearance, and anyway the theory of freedom needs it: it is because the noumenal cause of an event is not in time, and thus is not itself an event, that it escapes the causality of nature. Kant is unembarrassed: ‘Inasmuch as it (...)
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  29. Garth Green (2010). The Aporia of Inner Sense: The Self-Knowledge of Reason and the Critique of Metaphysics in Kant. Brill.
  30. Andy Hamilton (2010). Review: Guyer, Knowledge, Reason and Taste: Kant's Response to Hume. [REVIEW] Australasian Journal of Philosophy 88 (4):737-739.
  31. Dietmar Heidemann (2013). Dass Ich bin: Zu Kants Begriff des reinen Existenzbewusstseins. In Stefano Bacin, Alfredo Ferrarin, Claudio La Rocca & Margit Ruffing (eds.), Kant und die Philosophie in Weltbürgerlicher Absicht. De Gruyter.
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  32. R. Howell (1996). Review. Kant and the Mind. Andrew Brook. Mind 105 (419):491-495.
  33. Erwin Hufnagel (1974). Aspekte der Schelerschen Personlehre. Kant-Studien 65 (1-4):436-456.
  34. Paulo Jesus (2010). Le Je Pense Comme Facteur de Vérité: Adéquation, Cohérence Et Communauté Sémantique. Kant-Studien 101 (2):167-188.
  35. Paulo Jesus (2008). Poetique de L'Ipse: Etude Sur le Je Pense Kantien. Lang.
  36. Immanuel Kant (1993). Opus Postumum. Cambridge University Press.
    This volume is the first ever English translation of Kant's last major work, the so-called Opus Postumum, a work Kant himself described as his 'chef d'oeuvre' and as the keystone of his entire philosophical system. It occupied him for more than the last decade of his life. Begun with the intention of providing a 'transition from the metaphysical foundations of natural science to physics,' Kant's reflections take him far beyond the problem he initially set out to solve. In fact, he (...)
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  37. Patricia Kitcher (2014). Replies. Kantian Review 19 (1):149-159.
  38. Patricia Kitcher (2000). On Interpreting Kant's Thinker as Wittgenstein's 'I'. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 61 (1):33-63.
  39. Patricia Kitcher (1994). Kant's Transcendental Psychology. OUP USA.
    For the last 100 years historians have denigrated the psychology of the Critique of Pure Reason. In opposition, Patricia Kitcher argues that we can only understand the deduction of the categories in terms of Kant's attempt to fathom the psychological prerequisites of thought, and that this investigation illuminates thinking itself. Kant tried to understand the "task environment" of knowledge and thought: Given the data we acquire and the scientific generalizations we make, what basic cognitive capacities are necessary to perform these (...)
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  40. Patricia Kitcher (1984). Kant's Real Self. In Allen W. Wood (ed.), Self and Nature in Kant's Philosophy. Cornell University Press. 113--47.
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  41. Patricia Kitcher (1982). Kant on Self-Identity. Philosophical Review 91 (1):41-72.
    Despite Kemp Smith's claims to the contrary, I show that there is good reason to believe that Kant was aware of Hume's attack on personal identity. My interpretive claim is that we can make sense of many of Kant's puzzling remarks in the subjective deduction by assuming that he was trying to reply to Hume's challenge. My substantive claim is that Kant succeeds in defending a notion of the self as a continuing sequence of informationally interdependent states.
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  42. Patricia Kitcher (1982). Kant's Paralogisms. Philosophical Review 91 (4):515-547.
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  43. Christine M. Korsgaard (1989). Personal Identity and the Unity of Agency: A Kantian Response to Parfit. Philosophy and Public Affairs 18 (2):103-31.
  44. Apaar Kumar (2010). Review: Melnick, Kant's Theory of Self. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Philosophy 48 (4):535-536.
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  45. Jan Kuneš (2008). Kant a Otázka Subjektu. Nakl. Karolinum.
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  46. Alison Laywine (2005). Kant on the Self as Model of Experience. Kantian Review 9 (1):1-29.
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  47. Yvonne Le Meur (2012). El sustrato filosófico de la modernidad en la civilización occidental. Ingenium. Revista Electrónica de Pensamiento Moderno y Metodología En Historia de la Ideas 6 (6):155-178.
    Revisiting the successive steps that gave birth to the modern occidental subject and showing that it hasn't always existed in the way it does today is the aim of this work. Since the Pre-Socratic philosophers and Socrates, Plato and Saint Augustine, the gradual configuration of an inner space favors the formation of an autonomous subject, ontologically linked at birth. Its subsequent emancipation and transformation into a radical reflexivity during Modernity remains linked to the philosophy of Descartes, Locke, and Kant.
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  48. Bruno Liebrucks (1976). Selbstbewußtsein Und Selbsterkenntnis Bei Kant. Kant-Studien 67 (1-4):442-465.
  49. Béatrice Longuenesse (2012). Two Uses of 'I' as Subject? In Simon Prosser & François Recanati (eds.), Immunity to Error through Misidentification.
  50. Greg Lynch (2012). The Semantics of Self-Knowledge in the Refutation of Idealism. Kant Studies Online.
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