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  1. Paul Abela (2013). Review: Smith & Sullivan (Eds), Transcendental Philosophy and Naturalism. [REVIEW] Kantian Review 18 (1):148-154.
    Book Reviews Paul Abela, Kantian Review , FirstView Article(s).
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  2. Paul Abela (2013). Review: Smith & Sullivan (Eds), Transcendental Philosophy and Naturalism. [REVIEW] Kantian Review 18 (1):148-154.
    Book Reviews Paul Abela, Kantian Review , FirstView Article(s).
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  3. Henry E. Allison (2004). Kant's Transcendental Idealism. Yale University Press.
    This landmark book is now reissued in a new edition that has been vastly rewritten and updated to respond to recent Kantian literature.
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  4. Henry E. Allison (2000). Where Have All the Categories Gone? Reflections on Longuenesse's Reading of Kant's Transcendental Deduction. Inquiry 43 (1):67 – 80.
    This paper contains a critical analysis of the interpretation of Kant's second edition version of the Transcendental Deduction offered by Béatrice Longuenesse in her recent book: Kant and the Capacity to Judge. Though agreeing with much of Longuenesse's analysis of the logical function of judgment, I question the way in which she tends to assign them the objectifying role traditionally given to the categories. More particularly, by way of defending my own interpretation of the Deduction against some of her criticisms, (...)
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  5. Henry E. Allison (1996). Idealism and Freedom: Essays on Kant's Theoretical and Practical Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.
    Henry Allison is one of the foremost interpreters of the philosophy of Kant. This new volume collects all his recent essays on Kant's theoretical and practical philosophy. All the essays postdate Allison's two major books on Kant (Kant's Transcendental Idealism, 1983, and Kant's Theory of Freedom, 1990), and together they constitute an attempt to respond to critics and to clarify, develop and apply some of the central theses of those books. Two are published here for the first time. Special features (...)
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  6. Henry E. Allison (1993). Apperception and Analyticity in the B-Deduction. Grazer Philosophische Studien 44:233-252.
    This paper defends the thesis of the analyticity of the principle of apperception, as developed in the first part of the B-Deduction, against recent criticisms by Paul Guyer and Patricia Kitchen The first part presents these criticisms, the most important of which being that the analyticity thesis is incompatible with both the avowed goal of which being that the Deduction of establishing the validity of the categories and Üie account of apperception in the A-Deduction. The second part argues that Kant's (...)
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  7. Henry E. Allison (1987). Reflections on the B-Deduction. Southern Journal of Philosophy 25 (S1):1-15.
  8. Karl Ameriks (1985). Review: Hoffe, Immanuel Kant. Review of Metaphysics 38 (3):636-637.
  9. Karl Ameriks (1985). Hegel's Critique of Kant's Theoretical Philosophy. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 46 (1):1-35.
    This paper analyzes hegel's critique of kant's theoretical philosophy in terms of three specific objections to kant's transcendental deduction (concerning the representation of the i, The necessity of the categories, And the problem of a preliminary epistemology) and three specific objections to kant's transcendental idealism (concerning the thing in itself, The antinomies, And other specific problems of the transcendental dialectic).
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  10. Karl Ameriks (1982). Recent Work on Kant's Theoretical Philosophy. American Philosophical Quarterly 19 (1):1 - 24.
  11. Karl Ameriks (1980). Review: Scruton, Kant. [REVIEW] Teaching Philosophy 3 (3):359-363.
  12. Karl Ameriks (1978). Kant's Transcendental Deduction as a Regressive Argument. Kant-Studien 69 (1-4):273-287.
    Major recent interpretations of Kant's first "critique" (wolff, Strawson, Bennett) have taken his transcendental deduction to be an argument from the fact of consciousness to the existence of an objective world. I argue that it is unclear such an argument can succeed and there are overwhelming reasons to believe kant understood his deduction as having a very different form, namely as moving from the premise that there is empirical knowledge to the conclusion that there are universally valid pure categories. Detailed (...)
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  13. Richard E. Aquila (1976). Two Kinds of Transcendental Arguments in Kant. Kant-Studien 67 (1-4):1-19.
  14. Ralf M. Bader (2012). The Role of Kant's Refutation of Idealism. Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 94 (1):53-73.
    This paper assesses the role of the Refutation of Idealism within the Critique of Pure Reason, as well as its relation to the treatment of idealism in the First Edition and to transcendental idealism more generally. It is argued that the Refutation is consistent with the Fourth Paralogism and that it can be considered as an extension of the Transcendental Deduction. While the Deduction, considered on its own, constitutes a 'regressive argument', the Refutation allows us to turn the Transcendental Analytic (...)
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  15. Gary Banham, Kant's Refutations of Idealism.
  16. Adrian Bardon (2006). The Aristotelian Prescription: Skepticism, Retortion, and Transcendental Arguments. International Philosophical Quarterly 46 (3):263-276.
    From a number of quarters have come attempts to answer some form of skepticism—about knowledge of the external world, freedom of the will, or moral reasons—by showing it to be performatively self-defeating. Examples of this strategy are subject to a number of criticisms, in particular the criticism that they fail to shift the burden of proof from the anti-skeptical position, and so fail to establish the epistemic entitlement they seek. To these approaches I contrast one way of understanding Kant’s core (...)
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  17. Adrian Bardon, Transcendental Arguments. Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
  18. Nathan Bauer (2010). Kant's Subjective Deduction. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 18 (3):433-460.
    In the transcendental deduction, the central argument of the Critique of Pure Reason, Kant seeks to secure the objective validity of our basic categories of thought. He distinguishes objective and subjective sides of this argument. The latter side, the subjective deduction, is normally understood as an investigation of our cognitive faculties. It is identified with Kant’s account of a threefold synthesis involved in our cognition of objects of experience, and it is said to precede and ground Kant’s proof of the (...)
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  19. P. Baumanns (1992). Kants transzendentale Deduktion der reinen Verstandesbegriffe (B). Ein kritischer Forschungsbericht. Dritter Teil. Kant-Studien 83 (1):60-83.
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  20. P. Baumanns (1991). Kants Transzendentale Deduktion der Reinen Verstandesbegriffe (B). Ein Kritischer Forschungsbericht. Zweiter Teil. Kant-Studien 82 (4):436-455.
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  21. Peter Baumanns (1992). Kants transzendentale Deduktion der reinen Verstandesbegriffe (B). Ein kritischer Forschungsbericht. Vierter Teil. Kant-Studien 83 (2):185-207.
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  22. Peter Baumanns (1991). Kants Transzendentale Deduktion der Reinen Verstandesbegriffe (B). Ein Kritischer Forschungsbericht. Erster Teil. Kant-Studien 82 (3):329-348.
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  23. Lewis White Beck (1976). Is There a Non Sequitur in Kant's Proof of the Causal Principle? Kant-Studien 67 (1-4):385-389.
  24. W. Becker (1985). Critique and Justification in Transcendental Argumentation. Kant-Studien 76 (2):170-195.
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  25. Wolfgang Becker (1985). Kritik und Begründung in transzendentaler Argumentation. Kant-Studien 76 (1-4):170-195.
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  26. Jonathan Francis Bennett (1966). Kant's Analytic. London, Cambridge U.P..
  27. Robert J. Benton (1978). The Transcendental Argument in Kant's Groundwork. Journal of Value Inquiry 12 (3).
  28. Alessandro Bertinetto (2007). Genèse et récursivité: la déduction des catégories dans la Doctrine de la Science 1805 de J.G. Fichte. Révue de Métaphisique Et de Morale 3 (4):521-553.
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  29. Michel Bitbol, Some Steps Towards a Transcendental Deduction of Quantum Mechanics.
    The two major options on which the current debate on the interpretation of quantum mechanics relies, namely realism and empiricism, are far from being exhaustive. There is at least one more position available, which is metaphysically as agnostic as empiricism, but which shares with realism a committment to considering the structure of theories as highly significant. The latter position has been named transcendentalism after Kant. In this paper, a generalized version of Kant's method is used. This yields a reasoning that (...)
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  30. Anthony Brueckner (1996). Modest Transcendental Arguments. Philosophical Perspectives 10 (Metaphysics):265-280.
    Kantian transcendental arguments are aimed at uncovering the necessary conditions for the possibility of thought and experience. If such arguments are to have any force against Cartesian skepticism about knowledge of the external world, then it would seem that the conditions the transcendental argument uncovers must be non-psychological in nature, and their special status must be knowable a priori. In "Transcendental Arguments", Barry Stroud raised the question whether there are any such conditions., He answered that it was very doubtful that (...)
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  31. Anthony L. Brueckner (1984). Transcendental Arguments II. Noûs 18 (2):197-225.
    In part I of the present work, I used the term 'Kantian transcendental argument' to refer to any argument which purports to establish that the existence of outer objects is a logically necessary condition for the possibility of self-conscious experience. In this second part, then, I examine Kantian transcendental arguments which proceed from the premise that one is the subject of widely construed self-conscious experience.
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  32. Anthony L. Brueckner (1983). Transcendental Arguments I. Noûs 17 (4):551-575.
    A Kantian transcendental argument is an argument which purports to show that the existence of physical objects of a certain general character is a condition for the possibility of self-conscious experience. Both the Transcendental Deduction and the Refutation of Idealism satisfy this characterization. But we have seen that even a successful Kantian transcendental argument would be somewhat disappointing. Even though such an argument would refute the extreme Cartesian skepticism about the very existence of physical objects, it would not certify any (...)
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  33. G. Anthony Bruno (forthcoming). Epistemic Reciprocity in Schelling's Late Return to Kant. In Pablo Muchnik (ed.), Rethinking Kant (volume 4). Cambridge Scholars Publishing.
    In his 1841-2 Berlin lectures, Schelling critiques German idealism’s negative method of regressing from existence to its first principle, which is supposed to be intelligible without remainder. He sees existence as precisely its remainder since there could be nothing that exists. To solve this, Schelling enlists the positive method of progressing from the fact of existence to a proof of this principle’s reality. Since this proof faces the absurdity that there is anything rather than nothing, he concludes that this fact’s (...)
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  34. John J. Callanan (2006). Kant's Transcendental Strategy. Philosophical Quarterly 56 (224):360–381.
    The interpretation of transcendental arguments remains a contentious issue for contemporary epistemology. It is usually agreed that they originated in Kant's theoretical philosophy and were intended to have some kind of anti-sceptical efficacy. I argue that the sceptic with whom Kant was concerned has been consistently misidentified. The actual sceptic was Hume, questioning whether the faculty of reason can justify any of our judgements whatsoever. His challenge is a sceptical argument regarding rule-following which engenders a vicious regress. Once this sceptical (...)
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  35. Quassim Cassam (2003). Can Transcendental Epistemology Be Naturalized? Philosophy 78 (2):181-203.
    Transcendental epistemology is an inquiry into conditions of human knowledge which reflect the structure of the human cognitive apparatus. The dependence thesis is the thesis that a proper investigation of such conditions must lean in important respects on the deliverances of science. I argue that Kant is right to object to the dependence thesis, but that the best objections to this thesis lead to the conclusion that the conditions of knowledge which Kant identifies are not, in any interesting sense, a (...)
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  36. Quassim Cassam (1989). Kant and Reductionism. Review of Metaphysics 43 (September):72-106.
  37. Brian Chance (2014). Kant and the Discipline of Reason. European Journal of Philosophy 21 (4).
    Kant's notion of ‘discipline’ has received considerable attention from scholars of his philosophy of education, but its role in his theoretical philosophy has been largely ignored. This omission is surprising since his discussion of discipline in the first Critique is not only more extensive and expansive in scope than his other discussions but also predates them. The goal of this essay is to provide a comprehensive reading of the Discipline that emphasizes its systematic importance in the first Critique. I argue (...)
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  38. Andrew Chignell (2007). Review of Georges Dicker, Kant's Theory of Knowledge. [REVIEW] Philosophical Review 116 (2):307-309.
    A review of Georges Dicker's primer on Kant's theoretical philosophy. -/- .
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  39. Georges Dicker (2008). Review: Westphal, Kant's Transcendental Proof of Realism. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 76 (3):740–745.
  40. Corey W. Dyck (2011). Kant's Transcendental Deduction and the Ghosts of Descartes and Hume. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 19 (3):473-496.
    This paper considers how Descartes's and Hume's sceptical challenges were appropriated by Christian Wolff and Johann Nicolaus Tetens specifically in the context of projects related to Kant's in the transcendental deduction. Wolff introduces Descartes's dream hypothesis as an obstacle to his account of the truth of propositions, or logical truth, which he identifies with the 'possibility' of empirical concepts. Tetens explicitly takes Hume's account of our idea of causality to be a challenge to the `reality' of transcendent concepts in general, (...)
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  41. Corey W. Dyck (2009). Review of Scott Stapleford, Kant's Transcendental Arguments: Disciplining Pure Reason. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2009 (4).
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  42. Dina Emundts (2006). Die Paralogismen und die Widerlegung des Idealismus in Kants „Kritik der reinen Vernunft“. Deutsche Zeitschrift für Philosophie 54 (2/2006).
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  43. Stephen Engstrom (1994). The Transcendental Deduction and Skepticism. Journal of the History of Philosophy 32 (3):359-380.
    The common assumption that the Transcendental Deduction aims to refute scepticism often leads interpreters to conclude that it fails and even that Kant is confused about what it is supposed to achieve. By examining what Kant himself says concerning the Deductions' relation to scepticism, this article seeks to determine what sort of scepticism he has in view and how he responds to it. It concludes that the Deduction aims neither to refute Cartesian, outer- world scepticism nor to refute Humean, empiricist (...)
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  44. J. Claude Evans (1990). Two-Steps-in-One-Proof: The Structure of the Transcendental Deduction of the Categories. Journal of the History of Philosophy 28 (4):553-570.
  45. Paul Franks (1999). Transcendental Arguments, Reason, and Skepticism: Contemporary Debates and the Origins of Post-Kantianism. In Robert Stern (ed.), Transcendental Arguments: Problems and Prospects. Oxford University Press. 111--145.
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  46. Paul W. Franks (2005). All or Nothing: Systematicity, Transcendental Arguments, and Skepticism in German Idealism. Harvard University Press.
    In this work, the first overview of the German Idealism that is both conceptual and methodological, Paul W. Franks offers a philosophical reconstruction that is...
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  47. Michael Friedman (2012). Kant on Geometry and Spatial Intuition. Synthese 186 (1):231-255.
    I use recent work on Kant and diagrammatic reasoning to develop a reconsideration of central aspects of Kant’s philosophy of geometry and its relation to spatial intuition. In particular, I reconsider in this light the relations between geometrical concepts and their schemata, and the relationship between pure and empirical intuition. I argue that diagrammatic interpretations of Kant’s theory of geometrical intuition can, at best, capture only part of what Kant’s conception involves and that, for example, they cannot explain why Kant (...)
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  48. Michael Friedman (1989). Kant on Space, the Understanding, and the Law of Gravitation. The Monist 72 (2):236-284.
  49. Mainz Funke, M. Lauth, F. Bern, La Rocca, Robinson, Brandt, Schulze, Bondeli, Dancy, Plerobon & Chenet (1996). Kant-Studien, Begründet von Hans Vaihinger; neubegründet von Paul Menzer und Gottfried Martin. Kant-Studien 1896:385.
  50. Ernesto V. Garcia (2008). Review: Franks, All or Nothing: Systematicity, Transcendental Arguments, and Skepticism in German Idealism. [REVIEW] Philosophical Review 117 (2):300-303.
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