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  1. Paul Abela (2013). Review: Smith and Sullivan, Transcendental Philosophy and Naturalism. [REVIEW] Kantian Review 18 (1):148-154.
    Book Reviews Paul Abela, Kantian Review , FirstView Article(s).
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  2. Paul Abela (2013). Review: Smith & Sullivan (Eds), Transcendental Philosophy and Naturalism. [REVIEW] Kantian Review 18 (1):148-154.
    Book Reviews Paul Abela, Kantian Review , FirstView Article(s).
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  3. Henry E. Allison (2000). Where Have All the Categories Gone? Reflections on Longuenesse's Reading of Kant's Transcendental Deduction. Inquiry 43 (1):67 – 80.
    This paper contains a critical analysis of the interpretation of Kant's second edition version of the Transcendental Deduction offered by Béatrice Longuenesse in her recent book: Kant and the Capacity to Judge. Though agreeing with much of Longuenesse's analysis of the logical function of judgment, I question the way in which she tends to assign them the objectifying role traditionally given to the categories. More particularly, by way of defending my own interpretation of the Deduction against some of her criticisms, (...)
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  4. Richard E. Aquila (1976). Two Kinds of Transcendental Arguments in Kant. Kant-Studien 67 (1-4):1-19.
  5. Gary Banham, Kant's Refutations of Idealism.
  6. Adrian Bardon, Transcendental Arguments. Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
  7. Adrian Bardon (2006). The Aristotelian Prescription: Skepticism, Retortion, and Transcendental Arguments. International Philosophical Quarterly 46 (3):263-276.
    From a number of quarters have come attempts to answer some form of skepticism—about knowledge of the external world, freedom of the will, or moral reasons—by showing it to be performatively self-defeating. Examples of this strategy are subject to a number of criticisms, in particular the criticism that they fail to shift the burden of proof from the anti-skeptical position, and so fail to establish the epistemic entitlement they seek. To these approaches I contrast one way of understanding Kant’s core (...)
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  8. Nathan Bauer (2010). Kant's Subjective Deduction. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 18 (3):433-460.
    In the transcendental deduction, the central argument of the Critique of Pure Reason, Kant seeks to secure the objective validity of our basic categories of thought. He distinguishes objective and subjective sides of this argument. The latter side, the subjective deduction, is normally understood as an investigation of our cognitive faculties. It is identified with Kant’s account of a threefold synthesis involved in our cognition of objects of experience, and it is said to precede and ground Kant’s proof of the (...)
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  9. Lewis White Beck (1976). Is There a Non Sequitur in Kant's Proof of the Causal Principle? Kant-Studien 67 (1-4):385-389.
  10. Wolfgang Becker (1985). Kritik und Begründung in transzendentaler Argumentation. Kant-Studien 76 (1-4):170-195.
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  11. Ermanno Bencivenga (1987). Kant's Copernican Revolution. Oxford University Press.
    This is a highly original, wide-ranging, and unorthodox discourse on the idea of philosophy contained in Kant's major work, the Critique of Pure Reason. Bencivenga proposes a novel explanation of the Critique's celebrated "obscurity." This great obstacle to reading Kant, Bencivenga argues, has nothing to do with Kant's being a bad writer or with his having anything very complicated to say; rather, it is the natural result of the kind of operation Kant was performing: a universal conceptual revolution. Bencivenga contends (...)
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  12. Jonathan Francis Bennett (1966). Kant's Analytic. London, Cambridge U.P..
  13. Robert J. Benton (1978). The Transcendental Argument in Kant's Groundwork. Journal of Value Inquiry 12 (3).
  14. Alessandro Bertinetto (2007). Genèse et récursivité: la déduction des catégories dans la Doctrine de la Science 1805 de J.G. Fichte. Révue de Métaphisique Et de Morale 3 (4):521-553.
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  15. G. Anthony Bruno (forthcoming). Epistemic Reciprocity in Schelling's Late Return to Kant. In Pablo Muchnik (ed.), Rethinking Kant (volume 4). Cambridge Scholars Publishing.
    In his 1841-2 Berlin lectures, Schelling critiques German idealism’s negative method of regressing from existence to its first principle, which is supposed to be intelligible without remainder. He sees existence as precisely its remainder since there could be nothing that exists. To solve this, Schelling enlists the positive method of progressing from the fact of existence to a proof of this principle’s reality. Since this proof faces the absurdity that there is anything rather than nothing, he concludes that this fact’s (...)
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  16. John J. Callanan (2006). Kant's Transcendental Strategy. Philosophical Quarterly 56 (224):360–381.
    The interpretation of transcendental arguments remains a contentious issue for contemporary epistemology. It is usually agreed that they originated in Kant's theoretical philosophy and were intended to have some kind of anti-sceptical efficacy. I argue that the sceptic with whom Kant was concerned has been consistently misidentified. The actual sceptic was Hume, questioning whether the faculty of reason can justify any of our judgements whatsoever. His challenge is a sceptical argument regarding rule-following which engenders a vicious regress. Once this sceptical (...)
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  17. Quassim Cassam (2003). Can Transcendental Epistemology Be Naturalized? Philosophy 78 (2):181-203.
    Transcendental epistemology is an inquiry into conditions of human knowledge which reflect the structure of the human cognitive apparatus. The dependence thesis is the thesis that a proper investigation of such conditions must lean in important respects on the deliverances of science. I argue that Kant is right to object to the dependence thesis, but that the best objections to this thesis lead to the conclusion that the conditions of knowledge which Kant identifies are not, in any interesting sense, a (...)
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  18. Quassim Cassam (1989). Kant and Reductionism. Review of Metaphysics 43 (September):72-106.
  19. Brian Chance (2014). Kant and the Discipline of Reason. European Journal of Philosophy 21 (4).
    Kant's notion of ‘discipline’ has received considerable attention from scholars of his philosophy of education, but its role in his theoretical philosophy has been largely ignored. This omission is surprising since his discussion of discipline in the first Critique is not only more extensive and expansive in scope than his other discussions but also predates them. The goal of this essay is to provide a comprehensive reading of the Discipline that emphasizes its systematic importance in the first Critique. I argue (...)
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  20. Andrew Chignell (2007). Review of Georges Dicker, Kant's Theory of Knowledge. [REVIEW] Philosophical Review 116 (2):307-309.
    A review of Georges Dicker's primer on Kant's theoretical philosophy. -/- .
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  21. Georges Dicker (2008). Review: Westphal, Kant's Transcendental Proof of Realism. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 76 (3):740–745.
  22. Corey W. Dyck (2009). Review of Scott Stapleford, Kant's Transcendental Arguments: Disciplining Pure Reason. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2009 (4).
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  23. Paul W. Franks (2005). All or Nothing: Systematicity, Transcendental Arguments, and Skepticism in German Idealism. Harvard University Press.
    In this work, the first overview of the German Idealism that is both conceptual and methodological, Paul W. Franks offers a philosophical reconstruction that is ...
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  24. Mainz Funke, M. Lauth, F. Bern, La Rocca, Robinson, Brandt, Schulze, Bondeli, Dancy, Plerobon & Chenet (1996). Kant-Studien, Begründet von Hans Vaihinger; neubegründet von Paul Menzer und Gottfried Martin. Kant-Studien 1896:385.
  25. A. C. Genova (2008). Transcendentally Speaking. Kant-Studien 99 (1):13-29.
  26. Nathaniel Jason Goldberg (2004). Do Principles of Reason Have Objective but Indeterminate Validity? Kant-Studien 95 (4):405-425.
    Reason is precariously positioned in the Critique of Pure Reason. The Transcendental Analytic leaves no entry for reason in the cognitive process, and the Transcendental Dialectic restricts reason to noncognitive roles. Yet, in the Appendix to the Transcendental Dialectic, Kant contends that the ideas of reason can be used in empirical investigation and eventually knowledge acquisition. Given what Kant has said, how is this possible? Kant attempts to answer this in A663–A666/B691–B694 in the Appendix, where he argues that principles of (...)
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  27. Avery Goldman (2010). Kant, Heidegger, and the Circularity of Transcendental Inquiry. Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 15 (1):107-120.
    While in Being and Time Heidegger criticizes Kant for presupposing the very objects that he then goes on to examine, in his 1935–1936 lecture course What Is a Thing? he argues that the differentiation of subject and object with which Kant begins enables him to point to the temporal nature of thought. In following Kant’s own description of his project, Heidegger deems the presupposition of the objects of experience not detrimental to the inquiry, but determinative of its circular method. In (...)
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  28. H. Gomperz (1930). Kann Die Deduktion Zu „Neuen” Ergebnissen Führen? Kant-Studien 35 (1-4):466-479.
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  29. Moltke S. Gram (1979). Transcendental Arguments: A Meta-Critique. Kant-Studien 70 (1-4):508-513.
  30. Sophie Grapotte (2005). Validité et réalité objectives. Kant-Studien 96 (4):427-451.
  31. Stefanie Grüne (2011). Is There a Gap in Kant's B Deduction? International Journal of Philosophical Studies 19 (3):465 - 490.
    Abstract In ?Beyond the Myth of the Myth: A Kantian Theory of Non-Conceptual Content?, Robert Hanna argues for a very strong kind of non-conceptualism, and claims that this kind of non-conceptualism originally has been developed by Kant. But according to ?Kant?s Non-Conceptualism, Rogue Objects and the Gap in the B Deduction?, Kant?s non-conceptualism poses a serious problem for his argument for the objective validity of the categories, namely the problem that there is a gap in the B Deduction. This gap (...)
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  32. Paul Guyer (1987). Kant and the Claims of Knowledge. Cambridge University Press.
    This book offers a radically new account of the development and structure of the central arguments of Kant's Critique of Pure Reason: the defense of the objective validity of such categories as substance, causation, and independent existence. Paul Guyer makes far more extensive use than any other commentator of historical materials from the years leading up to the publication of the Critique and surrounding its revision, and he shows that the work which has come down to us is the result (...)
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  33. Bryan Hall (2006). Review: Westphal, Kant's Transcendental Proof of Realism. [REVIEW] Kantian Review 11 (1):127-130.
  34. R. Hiltscher (1993). Kant Proof-Structure of the Theory of Adequation of Truth in Die'transzendentale Deduktion (B)'. Kant-Studien 84 (4):426-447.
  35. Reinhard Hiltscher (1993). Kants Begründung der Adäquationstheorie der Wahrheit in der transzendentalen Deduktion der Ausgabe B. Kant-Studien 84 (4):426-447.
  36. Paul Hofmann (1931). Das problem Des satzes vom ausgeschlossenen dritten. Kant-Studien 36 (1-2):84-125.
  37. Martin G. Kalin (1972). Kant's Transcendental Arguments as Gedankenexperimente. Kant-Studien 63 (1-4):315-328.
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  38. Walter Kinkel (1912). Vereinzelte Bemerkungen zu B. Bauch: Studien zur Philosophie der exakten Wissenschaften. Kant-Studien 17 (1-3):283-287.
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  39. David Landy (2009). Sellars on Hume and Kant on Representing Complexes. European Journal of Philosophy 17 (2):224-246.
  40. David Landy (2009). Inferentialism and the Transcendental Deduction. Kantian Review 14 (1):1-30.
  41. Reinhard Lauth (1996). Leibniz im Verständnis Fichtes. Kant-Studien 87 (4):396-422.
  42. Justin Le Saux, Darwin Verses Kant.
    The more philosophically and scientifically profound aspect of the Copernican revolution, instead of being just a matter of taking the other end of the stick and orienting things in the opposite way, is that whereas before the Earth was looked upon as the centre of the universe (with the human race occupying an equally prime and important place in the existence of things), now it is looked upon as just one insignificant planet circle ling a smallish star amongst countless billions (...)
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  43. Markku Leppäkoski (1998). The Two Steps of the B-Deduction. Kantian Review 2:107-116.
  44. Beatrice Longuenesse (2008). Cassam and Kant on "How Possible" Questions and Categorial Thinking. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 77 (2):510-517.
  45. Béatrice Longuenesse (2005). Kant on the Human Standpoint. Cambridge University Press.
    Be;atrice Longuenesse considers the three aspects of Kant's philosophy, his epistemology and metaphysics of nature, moral philosophy, and aesthetic theory, under one unifying standpoint: Kant's conception of our capacity to form judgments. She argues that the elements which make up our cognitive access to the world have an equally important role to play in our moral evaluations and our aesthetic judgments. Her book will appeal to all interested in Kant and his thought, ranging over Kant's account of our representations of (...)
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  46. J. E. Malpas (1990). Transcendental Arguments and Conceptual Schemes. A Reconsideration of Körner's Uniqueness Argument. Kant-Studien 81 (2):232-251.
  47. Wolfgang Marx (1979). Entfremdung Durch Reflexion. Transzendentalphilosophische Überlegungen Zur Logik des Entfremdungsbegriffs. Kant-Studien 70 (1-4):35-51.
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  48. Melissa McBay Merritt (2011). Kant's Argument for the Apperception Principle. European Journal of Philosophy 19 (1):59-84.
    Abstract: My aim is to reconstruct Kant's argument for the principle of the synthetic unity of apperception. I reconstruct Kant's argument in stages, first showing why thinking should be conceived as an activity of synthesis (as opposed to attention), and then showing why the unity or coherence of a subject's representations should depend upon an a priori synthesis. The guiding thread of my account is Kant's conception of enlightenment: as I suggest, the philosophy of mind advanced in the Deduction belongs (...)
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  49. Dermot Moran (2000). Hilary Putnam and Immanuel Kant: Two `Internal Realists'? Synthese 123 (1):65-104.
    Since 1976 Hilary Putnam has drawn parallels between his `internal'',`pragmatic'', `natural'' or `common-sense'' realism and Kant''s transcendentalidealism. Putnam reads Kant as rejecting the then current metaphysicalpicture with its in-built assumptions of a unique, mind-independent world,and truth understood as correspondence between the mind and that ready-madeworld. Putnam reads Kant as overcoming the false dichotomies inherent inthat picture and even finds some glimmerings of conceptual relativity inKant''s proposed solution. Furthermore, Putnam reads Kant as overcoming thepernicious scientific realist distinction between primary and secondaryqualities, (...)
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  50. Kurt Mosser (2009). Kant and Wittgenstein: Common Sense, Therapy, and the Critical Philosophy. Philosophia 37 (1):1-20.
    Kant’s reputation for making absolutist claims about universal and necessary conditions for the possibility of experience are put here in the broader context of his goals for the Critical philosophy. It is shown that within that context, Kant’s claims can be seen as considerably more innocuous than they are traditionally regarded, underscoring his deep respect for “common sense” and sharing surprisingly similar goals with Wittgenstein in terms of what philosophy can, and at least as importantly cannot, provide.
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