Bookmark and Share

Kantian Ethics

Edited by Sven Nyholm (Eindhoven University of Technology)
Related categories
Subcategories:
617 found
Search inside:
(import / add options)   Order:
1 — 50 / 617
Material to categorize
  1. Richard Oxenberg (2015). Philosopher-Kings in the Kingdom of Ends: Why Democracy Needs a Philosophically Informed Citizenry. Philosophy Now 10 (111).
    My thesis is that in order for democracy to function it must inculcate in its citizens something of the self-transcending moral and intellectual virtues of Plato’s Philosopher-King, who identifies his own personal good with the good of society as a whole. Only thereby can Kant’s ideal of the ‘Kingdom of Ends,’ in which each citizen functions as both sovereign and subject, be realized. The alternative to this, as Plato well understood, is a society of appetitively driven individuals competing each with (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  2. Ferran Requejo (2012). Cosmopolitan Justice and Minority Rights: The Case of Minority Nations. Ramon Llull Journal of Applied Ethics 3 (3):83.
    This chapter links a conception of global justice, moral cosmopolitanism, with plurinational democracies. After giving a brief description of moral cosmopolitanism, I go on to analyse notions of cosmopolitanism and patriotism in Kant's work and the political significance that the notion of unsocial sociability and the Ideas of Pure Reason of Kant's first Critique have for cosmopolitanism. Finally, I analyse the relationship between cosmopolitanism and minority nations based on the preceding sections. I postulate the need for a moral and institutional (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  3. Faviola Rivera (2006). Kantian Ethical Duties. Kantian Review 11 (1):78-101.
    Perfect ethical duties have usually puzzled commentators on Kant's ethics because they do not fit neatly within his taxonomy of duties. Ethical duties require the adoption of maxims of ends: the happiness of others and one's own perfection are Kant's two main categories. These duties, he claims, are of wide obligation because they do not specify what in particular one ought to do, when, and how much. They leave ‘a latitude for free choice’ as he puts it. Perfect duties, however, (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  4. Faviola Rivera-Castro (2014). Kant’s Formula of the Universal Law of Nature Reconsidered. Journal of Moral Philosophy 11 (2):185-208.
    I criticize the widely accepted “practical” interpretation of the universality test contained in Kant’s first formula of the categorical imperative in the Groundwork of the Metaphysics of Morals – the formula of the universal law of nature. I argue that this interpretation does not work for contradictions in conception because it wrongly takes contradictions in the will as the model for them and, as a consequence, cannot establish a clear distinction between the two kinds of contradiction. This interpretation also assumes (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  5. Colin Roberts (1975). Zellner and Imperative Inferences. Mind 84 (333):111-113.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  6. Daniel N. Robinson and Rom Harre (1994). On the Demography of the Kingdom of Ends. Philosophy 69:5-19.
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  7. H. J. Roby (1905). The Imperative in St. John XX. 17. The Classical Review 19 (04):229-.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  8. Dennis A. Rohatyn (1975). Mill, Kant, and Negative Utility. Philosophia 5 (4):515-521.
  9. Georg Römpp (1994). Kant's Ethics as a Philosophy of Happiness. Modern Schoolman 71 (4):271-284.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  10. Viggo Rossvæ (1979). Kant's Moral Philosophy an Interpretation of the Categorical Imperative. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  11. Klas Roth (2011). Understanding Agency and Educating Character. Educational Theory 61 (3):257-274.
    How can we understand human agency, and what does it mean to educate character? In this essay Klas Roth develops a Kantian notion, one that suggests we render ourselves efficacious and autonomous in education and elsewhere. This requires, among other things, that we are successful in bringing about the intended result through our actions and the means used, and that we act in accordance with and are motivated by the Categorical Imperative. It also requires that we are or strive to (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  12. Tamar Bacia Schapiro (1997). Caring for Our Principles: Action Under Nonideal Conditions. Dissertation, Harvard University
    Kant's moral theory demands that we interact with others on the basis of reason rather than force. In deciding what to do, we are to reject any actions which depend for their efficacy upon bypassing the consent of others, whether through deception, coercion, or outright violence. In this sense, Kantianism puts forth a strongly anti-paternalistic, anti-manipulative ideal of human relations. And yet there are many situations in which we feel it can be permissible or even obligatory to act in paternalistic (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  13. W. Schmitals (1991). The Ethical Imperative According to Logstrup, Knud, E. Philosophische Rundschau 38 (1-2):131-142.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  14. J. B. Schneewind (2004). Comments on the Commentaries. Utilitas 16 (2):184-192.
    Adams 's suggestion that there must be one really right way of presenting the history of moral philosophy seems implausible to me, so I reject – with additional reasons – his charges against the structure of Invention of Autonomy. Skorupski's way of stating the ‘equal moral abilities’ thesis is not, I argue, very Kantian; a more Kantian version is not open to his objections. I am unconvinced by Schultz's claim that Sidgwick did not really hold that thesis. Deigh raises questions (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  15. Dieter Schönecker (2013). Das gefühlte Faktum der Vernunft. Skizze einer Interpretation und Verteidigung. Deutsche Zeitschrift für Philosophie 61 (1):91-107.
    Kant is by no means the pure rationalist that Husserl and others represented him as being. To the contrary I claim that Kant is an ethical intuitionist when it comes to our recognition of the validity of the moral law. Interpreting Kant’s famous thesis about the “fact of reason”, I will first argue for three interpretative theses: 1. The factum theory explains our insight into the binding character of the moral law; it is a theory of justification. 2. In our (...)
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
      Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  16. Dieter Schönecker (2013). Kant’s Argument for the Existence of Duties to Oneself in § 2 of the Tugendlehre. In Margit Ruffing, Claudio La Rocca, Alfredo Ferrarin & Stefano Bacin (eds.), Kant Und Die Philosophie in Weltbürgerlicher Absicht: Akten des Xi. Kant-Kongresses 2010. De Gruyter 609-622.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  17. G. Schrimpf (1980). The Suitability of the Categorical Imperative as the Supreme Principle of Ethics. Philosophisches Jahrbuch 87 (2):281-293.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  18. Marcus Schulzke (2012). Kant's Categorical Imperative, the Value of Respect, and the Treatment of Women. Journal of Military Ethics 11 (1):26-41.
    This paper explores the relevance of Kant's categorical imperative to military ethics and the solution it suggests for improving the treatment of women in the military. The second formulation of the categorical imperative makes universal respect for humanity a moral requirement by asserting that one must always treat other people as means in themselves and never as merely means to an end. This principle is a promising guide for military ethics and can be reconciled with the acts of violence required (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  19. Marc Schütze (2004). Subjektive Rechte Und Personale Identität: Die Anwendung Subjektiver Rechte Bei Immanuel Kant, Carl Schmitt, Hans Kelsen Und Hermann Heller. Duncker & Humblot.
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  20. Robert Shaver (1992). Hume on the Duties of Humanity. Journal of the History of Philosophy 30 (4):545-556.
  21. Nader Shoaibi (2010). In Defense of Kantian Moral Theory. California Undergraduate Philosophy Review 3 (1).
    In this paper, I will argue that Kant provides us with a plausible account of morality. To show that, I will first offer a major criticism of Kantian moral theory, by explaining Bernard Williams’ charge against it. I will explore his understanding of the Kantian theory, and then explain what he finds objectionable about it. This criticism will make up the first part of the paper. In the second part, I will attempt to defend the Kantian theory by appealing to (...)
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  22. Sonia Sikka (2006). Kantian Ethics in Being and Time. Journal of Philosophical Research 31:309-334.
    Heidegger’s Being and Time has been accused of espousing empty decisionism and relativism. I argue, first, that in fact Being and Time’s stress on the situated character of human judgment is supplemented by a very Kantian account of being human that defi nes appropriate behavior towards all entities possessing a certain character. Its analysis of conscience and guilt attempts to uncover the existential basis for the distinction Kant draws between the phenomenal and the noumenal aspects of the self. Building on (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  23. R. W. Simpson & T. C. Williams (1970). The Concept of the Categorical Imperative. Philosophical Quarterly 20 (78):90.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  24. Marcus G. Singer (1963). Duties and Duties to Oneself. Ethics 73 (2):133-142.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  25. Marcus G. Singer (1959). On Duties to Oneself. Ethics 69 (3):202-205.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   8 citations  
  26. Jane Singleton (2002). Virtue Ethics, Kantian Ethics, and Consequentialism. Journal of Philosophical Research 27:537-551.
    Contemporary theories of Virtue Ethics are often presented as being in opposition to Kantian Ethics and Consequentialism. It is argued that Virtue Ethics takes as fundamental the question, “What sort of character would a virtuous person have?” and that Kantian Ethics and Consequentialism take as fundamental the question, “What makes an action right?” I argue that this opposition is misconceived. The opposition is rather between Virtue Ethics and Kantian Ethics on the one hand and Consequentialism on the other. The former (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  27. John Skorupski (2005). Blame, Respect and Recognition: A Reply to Theo Van Willigenburg. Utilitas 17 (3):333-347.
    In an article in Utilitas Theo van Willigenburg has argued that moral valuation is distinguished from other forms of valuation by the Kantian concept of respect. He criticizes, from that standpoint, an account I put forward, which builds on the connections between moral wrongdoing, blame and withdrawal of recognition. I examine the difference between these two approaches and defend my own.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  28. Daniel Statman (1996). Who Needs Imperfect Duties? American Philosophical Quarterly 33 (2):211 - 224.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   6 citations  
  29. Peter J. Steinberger (1999). The Standard View of the Categorical Imperative. Kant-Studien 90 (1):91-99.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  30. James P. Sterba (2012). Taylor, Robert. Reconstructing Rawls: The Kantian Foundations of Justice As Fairness. Review of Metaphysics 66 (1):172-173.
  31. Karen Stohr (2011). Kantian Beneficence and the Problem of Obligatory Aid. Journal of Moral Philosophy 8 (1):45-67.
    Common sense tells us that in certain circumstances, helping someone is morally obligatory. That intuition appears incompatible with Kant's account of beneficence as a wide imperfect duty, and its implication that agents may exercise latitude over which beneficent actions to perform. In this paper, I offer a resolution to the problem from which it follows that some opportunities to help admit latitude and others do not. I argue that beneficence has two components: the familiar wide duty to help others achieve (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  32. Karen Stohr (2009). Minding Others' Business. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 90 (1):116-139.
    What do we do when a loved one is seriously messing up her life? While Kantianism describes the predicament nicely as a tension between love and respect, it is not well-suited to resolving it. Kantian respect prevents minding another’s business in cases where love demands it. Virtue ethics can readily explain the predicament as a tension between the virtues of sympathy and humility. Moreover, by changing the focus away from the other as a setter of ends and toward the would-be-benefactor’s (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  33. Philip Stratton-Lake (1991). Kant’s Theory of Freedom. [REVIEW] Radical Philosophy 59.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  34. Scott Stroud (2003). Kant and Śankara on Freedom. South Pacific Journal of Philosophy and Culture 7.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  35. Jussi Suikkanen & John Cottingham (eds.) (2009). Essays on Derek Parfit's on What Matters. Wiley-Blackwell.
    In _Essays on Derek Parfit's On What Matters,_ seven leading moral philosophers offer critical evaluations of the central ideas presented in a greatly anticipated new work by world-renowned moral philosopher Derek Parfit. Presents critical assessments of what promises to be one of the key moral philosophy texts of our time Features essays by a team of leading philosophers including Princeton's Michael Smith, one of the world's leading meta-ethicists Addresses Parfit's central thesis - that the main ethical theories can agree on (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  36. Roger J. Sullivan (1983). The Kantian Model of Moral-Practical Reason. The Monist 66 (1):83-105.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  37. Toby Svoboda (2014). A Reconsideration of Indirect Duties Regarding Non-Human Organisms. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 17 (2):311-323.
    According to indirect duty views, human beings lack direct moral duties to non-human organisms, but our direct duties to ourselves and other humans give rise to indirect duties regarding non-humans. On the orthodox interpretation of Kant’s account of indirect duties, one should abstain from treating organisms in ways that render one more likely to violate direct duties to humans. This indirect duty view is subject to several damaging objections, such as that (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  38. Sharon E. Sytsma (1993). The Role of Achtung in Kant's Moral Theory. Auslegung 19 (2):117-122.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  39. Pedro Tabensky (ed.) (2006). Judging and Understanding: Essays on Free Will, Narrative, Meaning and the Ethical Limits of Condemnation. Ashgate Pub Co.
    This collection embodies a debate that explores what could be characterised as the tension between judging and understanding.
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  40. Elizabeth Telfer (1987). Kant, Respect and Injustice: The Limits of Liberal Moral Theory. Philosophical Books 28 (4):236-238.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  41. A. Tellings (1998). A Virtue Approach Instead of a Kantian Approach as a Solution to Major Dilemmas in Meta-Ethics? A Criticism of David Carr. Studies in Philosophy and Education 17 (1):47-56.
    This contribution is a criticism of some points David Carr brings forward both in his 1991 book (Educating the Virtues) but even more so in his 1996 article in this journal (After Kohlberg: Some Implications of an Ethics of Virtue for the Theory of Moral Education and Development). With the help of a virtue approach Carr tries to solve the moral objectivism-moral relativism dilemma and the deontologism-consequentialism dilemma in ethics. I will argue that his attempt, though very interesting, suffers (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  42. Sergio Tenenbaum (2005). Friendship and the Law of Reason: Baier and Kant on Love and Principles. In Williams Jenkins (ed.), Persons, Promises, and Practices. University of Notre Dame Press 250-280.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  43. Karsten M. Thiel (2013). Kant's Categorical Imperative and the Moral Worth of Increasing Profits. In Christopher Luetege (ed.), Handbook of the Philosophical Foundations of Business Ethics. Springer 339--354.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  44. E. Hill Thomas (1994). [Book Review] Dignity and Practical Reason in Kant's Moral Theory. [REVIEW] In Peter Singer (ed.), Ethics. Oxford University Press 104--398.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  45. Laurence Thomas (2005). Moral Equality and Natural Inferiority. Social Theory and Practice 31 (3):379-404.
    This essay is a commentary upon "Race and Kant" by Thomas Hill, Jr and Bernard Boxill. They argue that although Kant in his anthropological writings took blacks to be inferior, his moral theory requires that they be shown the proper moral respect since blacks are persons nonetheless. I argue that this argument is sound, because the conception of inferiority that Kant attributed to blacks does not permit showing them the proper moral respect. Imagine a defective Mercedes Benz and a Ford (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  46. Lucas Thorpe (2011). The Realm of Ends as a Community of Spirits: Kant and Swedenborg on the Kingdom of Heaven and the Cleansing of the Doors of Perception. Heythrop Journal 52 (1):52-75.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  47. Lucas Thorpe (2010). Is Kant's Realm of Ends a Unum Per Se? Aquinas, Suárez, Leibniz and Kant on Composition. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 18 (3):461-485.
  48. Jens Timmermann (2005). Why Kant Could Not Have Been a Utilitarian. Utilitas 17 (3):243-264.
    In 1993, Richard Hare argued that, contrary to received opinion, Kant could have been a utilitarian. In this article, I argue that Hare was wrong. Kant's theory would not have been utilitarian or consequentialist even if his practical recommendations coincided with utilitarian commands: Kant's theory of value is essentially anti-utilitarian; there is no place for rational contradiction as the source of moral imperatives in utilitarianism; Kant would reject the move to separate levels of moral thinking: first-order moral judgement makes use (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  49. Martin James Townley (2002). Kant and Aristotle on Practical Reason and Virtue. Dissertation, University of Kentucky
    It has been widely assumed in the history of philosophy that the moral theories of Aristotle and Kant are so different that there simply is no common ground on which to compare them. This dissertation seeks to dispel that assumption and prepare the ground for dialogue between Aristotle and Kant. The thesis of this investigation is that if an analysis of each theory is conducted independently, and if that analysis is delineated specifically in terms of practical reason and virtue, then (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  50. Author unknown, How to Argue for the Value of Humanity.
    Pacific Philosophical Quarterly, March 2006. Significant effort has been devoted to locating a good argument for Kant ’s Formula of Humanity. In this paper, I contrast two arguments, based on Kant ’s text, for the Formula of Humanity. The first, which I call the “Valued Ends” argument, is an influential and appealing argument developed most notably by Christine Korsgaard and Allen Wood. Notwithstanding the appeal and influence of this argument, it ultimately fails on several counts. I therefore present as an (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
1 — 50 / 617