This category needs an editor. We encourage you to help if you are qualified.
Volunteer, or read more about what this involves.
Related categories
Siblings:
148 found
Search inside:
(import / add options)   Sort by:
1 — 50 / 148
  1. Louis Agosta (1978). Kant's Treasure Hard-to-Attain. Kant-Studien 69 (1-4):422-443.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Jami L. Anderson (1999). A Hegelian Theory of Punishment. Legal Theory 5 (4):363-388.
    Despite the bad press that retributivism often receives, the basic assumptions on which this theory of punishment rests are generally regarded as being attractive and compelling. First of these is the assumption that persons are morally responsible agents and that social practices, such as criminal punishment, must acknowledge that fact. Additionally, retributivism is committed to the claim that punishment must be proportionate to the crime, and not determined by such utilitarian concerns as the welfare of society, or the hope of (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Jami L. Anderson (1998). Understanding Punishment as Annulment. Social Philosophy Today 13:215-226.
    Hegel claims that punishment is justified because it annuls crimes thereby revealing the criminal act for what it is, a will “null and void.” In this paper I analyze the complex notion of annulment, arguing that Hegel is claiming that punishment does not change the past, but alters the status of the criminal will so as to reveal that will for what it is, a violation of a victim’s rights. In short, punishment invalidates the criminal's will and validates the victim's (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Marcus Arvan (2012). Unifying the Categorical Imperative. Southwest Philosophy Review 28 (1):217-225.
    This paper demonstrates something that Kant notoriously claimed to be possible, but which Kant scholars today widely believe to be impossible: unification of all three formulations of the Categorical Imperative. Part 1 of this paper tells a broad-brush story of how I understand Kant’s theory of practical reason and morality, showing how the three formulations of the Categorical Imperative appear to me to be unified. Part 2 then provides clear textual support for each premise in the argument for my interpretation.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Carla Bagnoli (forthcoming). “Respect and Obligation. The Scope of Kant’s Constructivism”,. In S. Bacin, C. la Rocca & M. Ruffing (eds.), Proceedings of the XI International Congress of the Kantian Society. De Gruyter.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Carla Bagnoli (2012). “Kant’s Contribution to Moral Epistemology”. Paradigmi 1:69-79.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Carla Bagnoli (2010). “Responsibility for Action”. Paradigmi 27 (1):75-86.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Carla Bagnoli (2009). “Practical Necessity: The Subjective Experience”. In W. Huemer & B. Centi (eds.), Value and Ontology. Ontos-Verlag.
  9. Carla Bagnoli (2009). Review of Charles Larmore The Autonomy of Morality. [REVIEW] Philosophical Review 118 (4):536-540.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Carla Bagnoli (2007). Respect and Membership in the Moral Community. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 10 (2):113 - 128.
    Some philosophers object that Kant's respect cannot express mutual recognition because it is an attitude owed to persons in virtue of an abstract notion of autonomy and invite us to integrate the vocabulary of respect with other persons-concepts or to replace it with a social conception of recognition. This paper argues for a dialogical interpretation of respect as the key-mode of recognition of membership in the moral community. This interpretation highlights the relational and practical nature of respect, and accounts for (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Carla Bagnoli (2003). Respect and Loving Attention. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 33 (4):483-516.
    On Kant's view, the feeling of respect is the mark of moral agency, and is peculiar to us, animals endowed with reason. Unlike any other feeling, respect originates in the contemplation of the moral law, that is, the idea of lawful activity. This idea works as a constraint on our deliberation by discounting the pretenses of our natural desires and demoting our selfish maxims. We experience its workings in the guise of respect. Respect shows that from the agent's subjective perspective, (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Sorin Baiasu, Howard Williams & Sami Pihlstrom (eds.) (2011). Politics and Metaphysics in Kant. University of Wales Press.
    The past three decades have witnessed the emergence, at the forefront of political thought, of several Kantian theories. Both the critical reaction to consequentialism inspired by Rawlsian constructivism and the universalism of more recent theories informed by Habermasian discourse ethics trace their main sources of inspiration back to Kant's writings. Yet much of what is Kantian in contemporary theory is formulated with more or less strict caveats concerning Kant's metaphysics. These range from radical claims that theories of justice must be (...)
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Anthony F. Beavers, Between Angels and Animals: The Question of Robot Ethics, or is Kantian Moral Agency Desirable?
    In this paper, I examine a variety of agents that appear in Kantian ethics in order to determine which would be necessary to make a robot a genuine moral agent. However, building such an agent would require that we structure into a robot’s behavioral repertoire the possibility for immoral behavior, for only then can the moral law, according to Kant, manifest itself as an ought, a prerequisite for being able to hold an agent morally accountable for its actions. Since (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Susanne Bobzien (1997). Kants Kategorien der praktischen Vernunft. Eine Anmerkung Zu Bruno Haas. Kant 3:77-80..
    ABSTRACT: A brief critique of Bruno Haas’ interpretation of Kant’s categories of practical reason and a reply to his criticism of my paper 'Die Kategorien der Freiheit bei Kant' ('Kant's Categories of Freedom').
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Susanne Bobzien (1988). Die Kategorien Der Freiheit Bei Kant (Kant's Categories of Freedom). Kant 1:193-220.
    NOTE: The English translation is listed separately. ABSTRACT: A general interpretation and close textual analysis of Kant’s theory of the categories of freedom (or categories of practical reason) in his Critique of Practical Reason. My main concerns in the paper are the following: (1) I show that Kant’s categories of freedom have primarily three functions: as conditions of the possibility for actions (i) to be free, (ii) to be comprehensible as free and (iii) to be morally evaluated. (2) I show (...)
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. William H. Bossart (1968). Kant's Doctrine of the Reciprocity of Freedom and Reason. International Philosophical Quarterly 8 (3):334-355.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Nick Bostrom, R. C. W. Ettinger & Charles Tandy (eds.) (2004). Death and Anti-Death, Volume 2: Two Hundred Years After Kant, Fifty Years After Turing. Palo Alto: Ria University Press.
  18. Alexander Broadie & Elizabeth M. Pybus (1981). Kant and Direct Duties. Dialogue 20 (01):60-67.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Alexander Broadie & Elizabeth M. Pybus (1974). Kant's Treatment of Animals. Philosophy 49 (190):375 - 383.
  20. C. Brown (2008). Kant and Therapeutic Privilege. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 33 (4):321-336.
  21. J. S. Callender (1998). Ethics and Aims in Psychotherapy: A Contribution From Kant. Journal of Medical Ethics 24 (4):274-278.
    Psychotherapy is an activity which takes many forms and which has many aims. The present paper argues that it can be viewed as a form of moral suasion. Kant's concepts of free will and ethics are described and these are then applied to the processes and outcome of psychotherapy. It is argued that his ideas, by linking rationality, free will and ethics into a single philosophical system, offer a valuable theoretical framework for thinking about aims and ethical issues in psychotherapy.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Claudia Card (2010). Kant's Moral Excluded Middle. In Sharon Anderson-Gold & Pablo Muchnik (eds.), Kant's Anatomy of Evil. Cambridge University Press.
  23. Georg Cavallar (2012). Review: Roth & Surprenant (Eds), Kant and Education: Interpretations and Commentary. [REVIEW] Kantian Review 17 (3):527-530.
  24. Yoon Choi (2008). Revisiting Kant's Ethics: Two Challenges to the Status Quo. Journal of Moral Philosophy 5 (1):137-149.
  25. Michael Cholbi (forthcoming). Kant on Euthanasia and the Duty to Die: Clearing the Air. Journal of Medical Ethics.
    Thanks to recent scholarship, Kant is no longer seen as the dogmatic opponent of suicide he appears at first glance. However, some interpreters have recently argued for a Kantian view of the morality of suicide with surprising, even radical, implications. More specifically, they have argued that Kantianism (a) requires that those with dementia or other rationality-eroding conditions end their lives before their condition results in their loss of identity as moral agents, and (b) requires subjecting the fully demented or those (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Michael Cholbi (2013). Kantian Paternalism and Suicide Intervention. In Christian Coons Michael Weber (ed.), Paternalism: Theory and Practice. Cambridge University Press.
  27. Michael Cholbi (2010). A Kantian Defense of Prudential Suicide. Journal of Moral Philosophy 7 (4):489-515.
    Kant's claim that the rational will has absolute value or dignity appears to render any prudential suicide morally impermissible. Although the previous appeals of Kantians (e. g., David Velleman) to the notion that pain or mental anguish can compromise dignity and justify prudential suicide are unsuccessful, these appeals suggest three constraints that an adequate Kantian defense of prudential suicide must meet. Here I off er an account that meets these constraints. Central to this account is the contention that some suicidal (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Michael Cholbi (2000). Kant and the Irrationality of Suicide. History of Philosophy Quarterly 17 (2):159-176.
    Though Kant calls the prohibition against suicide the first duty of human beings to themselves, his arguments for this duty lack his characteristic rigor and systematicity. The lack of a single authoritative Kantian approach to suicide casts doubt on what is generally regarded as an extreme and implausible position, to wit, that not only is suicide wrong in every circumstance, but is among the gravest moral wrongs. Here I try to remedy this lack of systematicity in order to show that (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Robert R. Clewis (2007). Review: Frierson, Freedom and Anthropology in Kant's Moral Philosophy. [REVIEW] Kantian Review 12 (2):196-199.
  30. Kelly Coble (2007). How Compatibilists Can Account for the Moral Motive: Autonomy and Metaphysical Internalism. Kant-Studien 98 (3):329-350.
  31. Kelly Coble (2003). Kant's Dynamic Theory of Character. Kantian Review 7 (1):38-71.
    Kant's moral theory has received trenchant criticism for its rigorism. Rigorism generally denotes an overemphasis on rules in moral theory, and a consequent neglect of the roles of emotional receptivity and perception in moral judgement. Critics of Kant's ethics have invoked the term rigorism with reference to any one of three overlapping features of Kant's moral theory. Usually rigorism designates the 'rigid and insensitive uniformities of conduct' that result from the mechanical application of rules. Occasionally it refers to the excessively (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Stephen Cooke (forthcoming). Perpetual Strangers: Animals and the Cosmopolitan Right. Political Studies.
    In this article I propose a cosmopolitan approach to animal rights based upon Kant's right of universal hospitality. Many approaches to animal rights buttress their arguments by finding similarities between humans and non-human animals; in this way they represent or resemble ethics of partiality. In this article I propose an approach to animal rights that initially rejects similarity approaches and is instead based upon the adoption of a cosmopolitan mindset acknowledging and respecting difference. Furthermore, and in agreement with Martha Nussbaum, (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Timothy M. Costelloe (2001). Review: Munzel, Kant's Conception of Moral Character: The "Critical" Link of Morality, Anthropology, and Reflective Judgment. Journal of the History of Philosophy 39 (3):445-446.
  34. Adam Cureton (forthcoming). Making Room for Rules. Philosophical Studies:1-23.
    Kantian moral theories must explain how their most basic moral values of dignity and autonomy should be interpreted and applied to human conditions. One place Kantians should look for inspiration is, surprisingly, the utilitarian tradition and its emphasis on generally accepted, informally enforced, publicly known moral rules of the sort that help us give assurances, coordinate our behavior, and overcome weak wills. Kantians have tended to ignore utilitarian discussions of such rules mostly because they regard basic moral principles as a (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Katerina Deligiorgi (2012). Review: González, Culture as Mediation: Kant on Nature, Culture, and Morality. [REVIEW] Kantian Review 17 (3):519-521.
  36. Lara Denis (2011). Humanity, Obligation, and the Good Will: An Argument Against Dean's Interpretation of Humanity. Kantian Review 15 (1):118-141.
  37. Lara Denis (2010). Freedom, Primacy, and Perfect Duties to Oneself. In , Kant's Metaphysics of Morals: A Critical Guide. Cambridge University Press.
  38. Lara Denis (2003). Review: Louden, Kant's Impure Ethics. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 66 (2):491-493.
  39. Lara Denis (2002). Kant's Ethical Duties and Their Feminist Implications. Canadian Journal of Philosophy, Supplementary Volume 28 (Supplement):157-87.
    Many feminist philosophers have been highly critical of Kant’s ethics, either because of his rationalism or because of particular claims he makes about women in his writings on anthropology and political philosophy. In this paper, I call attention to the aspects of Kant’s ethical theory that make it attractive from a feminist standpoint. Kant’s duties to oneself are rich resource for feminism. These duties require women to act in ways that show respect for themselves as rational human agents by, e.g., (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Lara Denis (2001). Moral Self-Regard: Duties to Oneself in Kant's Moral Theory. Garland Pub..
    Moral Self-Regard draws on the work of Marcia Baron, Joseph Butler and Allen Wood, among others in this first extensive study of the nature, foundation and significance of duties to oneself in Kant's moral theory.
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Lara Denis (1999). Kant on the Wrongness of 'Unnatural' Sex. History of Philosophy Quarterly 16 (2):225-48.
    I consider Kant’s use of claims about “nature’s ends” in his arguments to establish maxims of homosexual sex, masturbation, and bestiality as constituting “unnatural” sexual vices, which are contrary to one’s duties to oneself as an animal and moral being. I argue, first, that the formula of humanity is the principle best suited for understanding duties to oneself as an animal and moral being; and second, that although natural teleology is relevant to some degree in specifying these duties, it cannot (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Lara Denis (1999). Kant on the Perfection of Others. Southern Journal of Philosophy 37 (1):25-41.
    Kant claims that we have a duty to promote our own moral perfection, but not the moral perfection of others. I examine three types of argument for this asymmetry, as well as the implications of these arguments--and their success or failure--for Kantian theory. The arguments I consider say that (first) to promote others’ perfection is impossible; (second) to try to promote others’ perfection is impermissible; and (third) one cannot be obligated to promote both others’ perfection and one’s own. I argue (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Paul Dietrichson (1964). When is a Maxim Fully Universalizable ? Kant-Studien 55 (1-4):143-170.
  44. Paul Dietrichson (1962). What Does Kant Mean by 'Acting From Duty'? Kant-Studien 53 (1-4):277-288.
  45. Thomas Douglas (2014). Enhancing Moral Conformity and Enhancing Moral Worth. Neuroethics 7 (1):75-91.
    It is plausible that we have moral reasons to become better at conforming to our moral reasons. However, it is not always clear what means to greater moral conformity we should adopt. John Harris has recently argued that we have reason to adopt traditional, deliberative means in preference to means that alter our affective or conative states directly—that is, without engaging our deliberative faculties. One of Harris’ concerns about direct means is that they would produce only a superficial kind of (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Corey W. Dyck (2012). Chimerical Ethics and Flattering Moralists: Baumgarten's Influence on Kant's Moral Theory in the Observations and Remarks. In Susan Shell & Richard Velkley (eds.), Kant's Observations and Remarks: A Critical Guide. Cambridge University Press.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Sandra Jane Fairbanks (2000). Kantian Moral Theory and the Destruction of the Self. Westview Press.
    This anthology, Defining Public Administration , is designed to assist beginning and intermediate level students of public policy, and to stir the imaginations of readers concerned with public policy and administration. The forty-five articles included in the text are all reprinted from the International Encyclopedia of Public Policy and Administration , and these accessible, interesting articles have been assembled to offer a sample of the riches to be found within the larger work. The articles provide definitions of the vocabulary of (...)
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Mihaela C. Fistioc (2002). The Beautiful Shape of the Good: Platonic and Pythagorean Themes in Kant's Critique of the Power of Judgment. Routledge.
    This book investigates the link Kant discerned between our experience of beauty and our experience of the moral law. By examining Kant's relation to Greek philosophy, to Plato and Pythagoras, as found in Kant's own writings, the author sheds new light on one the most intriguing and mysterious doctrines of Kant's third Critique.
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. W. J. Fitzpatrick (2007). Review: Dean, The Value of Humanity in Kant's Moral Theory. [REVIEW] Mind 116 (464):1098-1104.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. Katrin Flikschuh (2002). Review: Guyer, Kant on Freedom, Law, and Happiness. [REVIEW] Dialogue 41 (03):606-.
1 — 50 / 148