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Kantian Ethics

Edited by Sven Nyholm (Eindhoven University of Technology)
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  1. Ryan Kemp (2011). The Contingency of Evil: Rethinking the Problem of Universal Evil in Kant's 'Religion'. In Oliver Thorndike (ed.), Rethinking Kant: Volume 3. Cambridge Scholars
    In this paper I explore how three seemingly incompatible Kantian theses–a libertarian notion of freedom, the inscrutability of one’s fundamental moral maxim, and the ubiquity of evil–can each be maintained without contradiction. I do this by arguing against the popular notion that in his 'Religion within the Bounds of Mere Reason,' Kant attributes 'radical evil' to all human beings.
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  2. Samuel Kerstein (2009). Treating Others Merely as Means. Utilitas 21 (2):163-180.
    In the Formula of Humanity, Kant embraces the principle that it is wrong for us to treat others merely as means. For contemporary Kantian ethicists, this Mere Means Principle plays the role of a moral constraint: it limits what we may do, even in the service of promoting the overall good. But substantive interpretations of the principle generate implausible results in relatively ordinary cases. On one interpretation, for example, you treat your opponent in a tennis tournament merely as a means (...)
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  3. E. R. Klein (2007). Space Exploration: Humanity's Single Most Important Moral Imperative. Philosophy Now 61:8-10.
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  4. Andrew Kope (2009). The Formula of Universal Law, by Extension, Provides the Universalizability Test for The. In David Papineau (ed.), Philosophy. Oxford University Press 2700--26.
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  5. Christine M. Korsgaard, A Kantian Case for Animal Rights.
    Most legal systems divide the world into persons and property, treating human beings as persons, and pretty much everything else, including non-human animals, as property. Persons are the subjects of both rights and obligations, including the right to own property, while objects of property, being by their very nature for the use of persons, have no rights at all. I will call this the “legal bifurcation.” We might look to Immanuel Kant’s moral and political philosophy to provide a philosophical vindication (...)
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  6. Manfred Kuehn (2009). Ethics and Anthropology in the Development of Kant's Moral Philosophy. In Jens Timmermann (ed.), Kant's Groundwork of the Metaphysics of Morals: A Critical Guide. Cambridge University Press
  7. Sudnya Kulkami (2001). The Categorical Imperative : Its Epistemological Status. Indian Philosophical Quarterly 28 (3):333.
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  8. S. Kulkarni (2001). The Categorical Imperative: Its Epistemological Status. Indian Philosophical Quarterly 28 (3):333-342.
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  9. Emil Kušan (2012). Aspects and Implications of Kant's Notion of Freedom. Filozofska Istrazivanja 32 (1):79-91.
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  10. Joyce Lazier (2011). Categorical Imperative as the Source for Morality. In Michael Bruce & Steven Barbone (eds.), Just the Arguments: 100 of the Most Important Arguments in Western Philosophy. Wiley-Blackwell
    Kant's argument that the categorical imperative is the source for morality broken down into premise and conclusion logical format.
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  11. Kwang-Sae Lee (1991). Two Ways of Morality: Confucian and Kantian. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 18 (1):89-121.
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  12. James Lenman (1998). Review of Korsgaard's Creating the Kingdom of Ends (1996, CUP). [REVIEW] Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 1 (4):487-8.
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  13. A. Lichtigfeld (1990). The Idea of Humanity. International Studies in Philosophy 22 (3):122-123.
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  14. Brendan E. A. Liddell (1959). Mr. Harsanyi on Hypothetical Imperatives. Mind 68 (272):527-529.
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  15. Andrew Linklater (1995). Richard Norman, Ethics, Killing and War, Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 1995, Pp. X + 256. Utilitas 7 (02):337-.
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  16. Bryan Lueck (forthcoming). Contempt and Moral Subjectivity in Kantian Ethics. Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie.
    I argue in this paper that Immanuel Kant's account of the moral wrongness of contempt in the Metaphysics of Morals provides important resources for our understanding of the nature of moral subjectivity. Although Kant typically emphasizes the subject's position as autonomous addressor of the moral law, his remarks on contempt bring into relief a dynamic relationship at the heart of practical subjectivity between the addressor and addressee positions. After tracing the development of reflection concerning the addressor and addressee positions in (...)
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  17. Bryan Lueck (2015). Tact as Ambiguous Imperative: Merleau-Ponty, Kant, and Moral Sense-Bestowal. Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 20 (1):195-211.
    I argue in this paper that some of the most basic commitments of Kantian ethics can be understood as grounded in the dynamic of sense that Merleau-Ponty describes in his Phenomenology of Perception. Specifically, I argue that Merleau-Ponty’s account supports the importance of universalizability as a test for the moral permissibility of particular acts as well as the idea that the binding character of the moral law is given as something like a fact of reason. But I also argue that (...)
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  18. Bryan Lueck (2008). Toward a Serresian Reconceptualization of Kantian Respect. Philosophy Today 52 (1):52-59.
    According to Immanuel Kant, moral experience is made possible by respect, an absolutely unique feeling in which the sensible and the intelligible are given immediately together. This paper argues that Kant's moral philosophy underemphasizes the role of this sensibility at the heart of moral experience and that a more rigorous conception of respect, grounded in Michel Serres's concepts of the parasite, the excluded/included third, and noise would yield a moral philosophy more consistent with Kant's own basic insights.
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  19. W. G. Maclagan (1953). The Nature of a Moral Duty. Philosophy 28 (107):353 - 354.
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  20. Jon Mandle (2010). Force and Freedom: Kant's Legal and Political Philosophy. Dialogue 49 (3):479-487.
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  21. Maksymilian Del Mar (2012). The Smithian Categorical Imperative. Archiv für Rechts- Und Sozialphilosophie 98:233-254.
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  22. John Marshall (1982). Hypothetical Imperatives. American Philosophical Quarterly 19 (January):105-114.
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  23. M. Mauri (2011). Self-Respect and Honesty. Filozofia 66:74-82.
    Self-esteem and self-respect refer to a way through which one relates to oneself, although they can be used as a synonymous expressions. On the basis of long tradition, since Kant ties self-respect to morality, all reference to self-respect has to be based on morality. Self-respect has a deeper root than self-esteem which is used to indicate a simple feeling of satisfaction with oneself without any value meaning. Self-respect is not a duty in itself but rather an acknowledgment of moral law (...)
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  24. George I. Mavrodes, Jan Narveson & J. W. Meiland (1964). Duties to Oneself. Analysis 24 (5):165 - 171.
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  25. Bernard Mayo & Basil Mitchell (1957). Varieties of Imperative. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 31:161-190.
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  26. Lovorka Mađarević (2009). Emotions as Motives in Kant's Ethics. Filozofska Istrazivanja 29 (2):335-348.
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  27. Richard McCarty (2015). False Negatives of the Categorical Imperative. Mind 124 (493):177-200.
    The categorical imperative can be construed as a universalization test for moral permissibility. False negatives of the categorical imperative would be maxims failing this test, despite the permissibility of their actions; maxims like: ‘I’ll withdraw all my savings on April 15th’. Examples of purported false negatives familiar from the literature can be grouped into three general categories, and dispatched by applying category-specific methods for proper formulation of their maxims, or for proper testing. Methods for reformulating failing maxims, such as the (...)
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  28. Richard R. McCarty (2006). Maxims in Kant's Practical Philosophy. Journal of the History of Philosophy 44 (1):65-83.
    : A standard interpretation of Kantian "maxims" sees them as expressing reasons for action, implying that we cannot act without a maxim. But recent challenges to this interpretation claim that Kant viewed acting on maxims as optional. Kant's understanding of maxims derives from Christian Wolff, who regarded maxims as major premises of the practical syllogism. This supports the standard interpretation. Yet Kant also viewed commitments to maxims as essential for virtue and character development, which supports challenges to the standard interpretation, (...)
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  29. Richard R. McCarty (1993). Kantian Moral Motivation and the Feeling of Respect. Journal of the History of Philosophy 31 (3):421-435.
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  30. H. J. McCloskey (1964). Problems Arising From Erroneous Moral Judgments. Philosophy 39 (150):283 - 300.
    Has a moral agent really done his duty when he has done what he wronglybelieves to be his duty? Is it right to act in accord with one's beliefs, even when they are mistaken? Or are we always obliged to perform that act which is objectively obligatory? In some such ways as these the problem as to whether one's ‘objective duty’ or one's ‘subjective duty’ is one's real duty has been posed. It might be argued that the objective view is (...)
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  31. R. McKenzie (1936). A Rare Imperative Form. The Classical Review 50 (02):60-.
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  32. A. Mcnicholl (1950). H. J. Paton. The Categorical Imperative. A Study of Kant's Moral Philosophy. [REVIEW] The Thomist 13:271.
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  33. J. Colin McQuillan (2014). Oaths, Promises, and Compulsory Duties: Kant's Response to Mendelssohn's Jerusalem. Journal of the History of Ideas 75 (4).
    This article argues that Kant's essay on enlightenment responds to Moses Mendelssohn's defense of the freedom of conscience in Jerusalem. While Mendelssohn holds that the freedom of conscience as an inalienable right, Kant argues that the use of one's reason may be constrained by oaths. Kant calls such a constrained use of reason the private use of reason. While he also defends the unconditional freedom of the public use of reason, Kant believes that one makes oneself a part of the (...)
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  34. Thaddeus Metz (2014). Dignity in the Ubuntu Tradition. In Marcus Düwell (ed.), Cambridge Handbook on Human Dignity. Cambridge University Press 310-18.
    I draw on ideas commonly advocated by adherents to ubuntu, the term often used to capture sub-Saharan morality, in order to spell out, and sometimes construct, understandings of human dignity that are worth taking seriously by professional ethicists, moral philosophers, jurisprudential scholars and Constitutional Courts anywhere in the world. In particular, I seek to articulate a theory of dignity grounded in African values that could serve as a genuine rival to the influential Kantian conception that currently dominates most intellectual reflection (...)
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  35. Thaddeus Metz (2013). 'The Meaning of Life Lies in the Search': Robert Kane's New Justification of Objective Values. Social Theory and Practice 39 (2):313-27.
    Part of Robert Kane’s response to the contemporary cultural condition of pluralism is to attempt to ground morality in the _search_ for wisdom about how to live. With regard to the right, Kane argues, roughly, that a new principle capturing what all morally permissible actions have in common warrants belief on the part of all inquirers, even in the face of reasonable uncertainty, because it is justified as an essential means to ascertaining wisdom. Upon embarking for wisdom, one quickly discovers (...)
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  36. Thaddeus Metz (2008). The Nature of Reactive Practices:Exploring Strawson’s Expressivism. South African Journal of Philosophy 27 (3):49-63.
    I aim to answer the questions of whether reactive practices such as gratitude and punishment are inherently expressive, and, if so, in what respect. I distinguish seven ways in which one might plausibly characterize reactive practices as essentially expressive in nature, and organise them so that they progress in a dialectical order, from weakest to strongest. I then critically discuss objections that apply to the strongest conception, questioning whether it coheres with standard retributive understandings of why, when and where the (...)
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  37. Thaddeus Metz (2006). Judging Because Understanding: A Defence of Retributive Censure. In Pedro Tabensky (ed.), Judging and Understanding: Essays on Free Will, Narrative, Meaning and the Ethical Limits of Condemnation. Ashgate 221-40.
    Thaddeus Metz defends the retributive theory of punishment against challenges mounted by some of the contributors to this collection (Kai Nielsen, Brian Penrose, Samantha Vice, Pedro Tabensky and Marc Fellman). People, he thinks, ought to be censured in a way that is proportional to what they have done and for which they are responsible. Understanding does not conflict with judging. On the contrary, according to him, the more we understand, the better we are able to censure appropriately. Metz’s argument is (...)
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  38. Thaddeus Metz (2002). The Reasonable and the Moral. Social Theory and Practice 28 (2):277-301.
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  39. Thaddeus Metz (2001). Respect for Persons and Perfectionist Politics. Philosophy and Public Affairs 30 (4):417–442.
    Can a state seek to promote a thick conception of the good (such as fostering a kind of meaning or excellence in people's lives) without treating its citizens disrespectfully? The predominant answer among friends of the principle of respect for persons is "no." The most powerful Kantian objection to non-liberalism or perfectionism is the claim that citizens who do not share the state's conception of the good would be wronged in that the state would treat a certain way of life (...)
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  40. C. D. Meyers (2008). The Virtue of Cold-Heartedness. Philosophical Studies 138 (2):233 - 244.
    I defend a strong version of the Kantian claim that actions done solely from duty have moral worth by (1) considering pure cases of acting from duty, (2) showing that love and sympathy, unlike a sense of duty, can often lead us to do the wrong thing, (3) carefully distinguishing moral from non-moral virtues, and (4) by distinguishing pathological sympathy from practical sympathy. Not only is acting purely from a sense of duty superior to acting from love and sympathetic feelings, (...)
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  41. Alan Montefiore (2003). Kant and the Categorical Imperative. Think 2 (5):75.
    Alan Montefiore explains how Kant's moral philosophy fits into and depends on the wider sweep of his work.
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  42. Seiriol Morgan (2009). Can There Be a Kantian Consequentialism? Ratio 22 (1):19-40.
    In On What Matters Derek Parfit argues that we need to make a significant reassessment of the relationship between some central positions in moral philosophy, because, contrary to received opinion, Kantians, contractualists and consequentialists are all 'climbing the same mountain on different sides'. In Parfit's view Kant's own attempt to outline an account of moral obligation fails, but when it is modified in ways entirely congenial to his thinking, a defensible Kantian contractualism can be produced, which survives the objections which (...)
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  43. Mary Mothersill (1961). Professor Wick on Duties to Oneself. Ethics 71 (3):205-208.
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  44. Dean Moyar (2004). Review of Patrick Frierson, Freedom and Anthropology in Kant's Moral Philosophy. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2004 (3).
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  45. G. Felicitas Munzel (1998). Making a Necessity of Virtue. Aristotle and Kant on Virtue. Review of Metaphysics 51 (4):955-957.
  46. Michael Nance (2013). The Categorical Imperative and the Universal Principle of Right. In Margit Ruffing, Claudio La Rocca, Alfredo Ferrarin & Stefano Bacin (eds.), Kant Und Die Philosophie in Weltbürgerlicher Absicht: Akten des Xi. Kant-Kongresses 2010. De Gruyter 873-884.
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  47. Michael Nance (2012). Kantian Right and the Categorical Imperative: Response to Willaschek. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 20 (4):541-556.
    Abstract In his 2009 article "Right and Coercion," Marcus Willaschek argues that the Categorical Imperative and the Universal Principle of Right are conceptually independent of one another because (1) the concept of right and the authorization to use coercion are analytically connected in Kant's "Doctrine of Right", but (2) the authorization to coerce cannot be derived from the Categorical Imperative. Given that the principle of right just is a principle of authorized coercion, the fact that the authorization to coerce cannot (...)
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  48. Jan Narveson (1990). Reply to Ripstein. Dialogue 29 (02):299-.
  49. Josefine Charlotte Nauckhoff (1994). The Role of the Emotions in the Moral Life According to Immanuel Kant. Dissertation, University of Pennsylvania
    Against common misconceptions of Kant as a philosopher who neglects the emotional aspects of moral life, I show that he actually considers our emotional dispositions to be valuable tools for perfecting ourselves morally. ;I show not only that it is incumbent on us to cultivate morally beneficial emotions, but also how we can do it. Building on Kant's vague hints about what the process involves, I argue that cultivating a given feeling requires, above all, sharpening one's judgment about it, one's (...)
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  50. Ilkka Niiniluoto (1986). Hypothetical Imperatives and Conditional Obligations. Synthese 66 (1):111 - 133.
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