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  1. Henry E. Allison (2013). The Singleness of the Categorical Imperative. In Margit Ruffing, Claudio La Rocca, Alfredo Ferrarin & Stefano Bacin (eds.), Kant Und Die Philosophie in Weltbürgerlicher Absicht: Akten des Xi. Kant-Kongresses 2010. De Gruyter. 37-54.
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  2. Brenda Almond (2012). Kantian Voices in the Family Values Debate. Ethics and Social Welfare 6 (2):143-156.
    One of the explanations frequently offered for current social problems is the breakdown of the family as an institution and the decline of values such as trust and responsibility that were until recently associated with it. While the philosophical position of many commentators in this area is rooted in a broadly utilitarian social philosophy, there is a case for an alternative?i.e. non-utilitarian?philosophical point of view. The essential requirement for such an alternative approach is that it accords a place to certain (...)
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  3. Judith Andre (2013). Open Hope as a Civic Virtue. Social Philosophy Today 29:89-100.
    Hope as a virtue is an acquired disposition, shaped by reflection; as a civic virtue it must serve the good of the community. Ernst Bloch and Lord Buddha offer help in constructing such a virtue. Using a taxonomy developed by Darren Webb I distinguish open hope from goal-oriented hope, and use each thinker to develop the former. Bloch and Buddha are very different (and notoriously obscure; I do not attempt an exegesis). But they share a metaphysics of change, foundational for (...)
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  4. John J. Ansbro (1973). Kant's Limitations on Individual Freedom. New Scholasticism 47 (1):88-99.
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  5. M. T. Antonelli (1948). H. Y. PATON, "The Categorical Imperative - A study in Kant's Moral, Philosophy". [REVIEW] Epistemologia 3 (5):535.
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  6. Richard E. Aquila (1984). Duty and Inclination: The Fundamentals of Morality Discussed and Redefined with Special Regard to Kant and Schiller. [REVIEW] Husserl Studies 1 (1):307-330.
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  7. Roy Ascott (2006). The Syncretic Imperative. Technoetic Arts: A Journal of Speculative Research 4 (2):109-113.
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  8. Julian Baggini (2012). Christine M. Korsgaard Interview. The Philosophers' Magazine 58:60-69.
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  9. Sorin Baiasu (2013). The Deontic Force of the Formula of Universal Law. In Margit Ruffing, Claudio La Rocca, Alfredo Ferrarin & Stefano Bacin (eds.), Kant Und Die Philosophie in Weltbürgerlicher Absicht: Akten des Xi. Kant-Kongresses 2010. De Gruyter. 41-50.
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  10. Tom Bailey (2003). Nietzsche's Kantian Ethics. International Studies in Philosophy 35 (3):5-27.
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  11. H. Barker (1948). PATON, H. J. - The Categorical Imperative: A Study in Kant's Moral Philosophy. [REVIEW] Mind 57:93.
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  12. Gerald W. Barnes (1971). In Defense of Kant's Doctrine of the Highest Good. Philosophical Forum 2 (4):446.
    MANY COMMENTATORS HAVE SAID THAT KANT'S DOCTRINE OF THE HIGHEST GOOD - AS EXPRESSED IN THE SECOND CRITIQUE, FOR EXAMPLE - IS SERIOUSLY FLAWED BOTH IN ITSELF AND IN THAT IT CONTRADICTS OTHER IMPORTANT CLAIMS OF KANT'S MORAL PHILOSOPHY. I ADVANCE AN INTERPRETATION OF KANT'S DOCTRINE ON WHICH IT SUFFERS FROM NONE OF THESE ALLEGED FLAWS.
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  13. Marcia Baron (1997). Three Methods of Ethics: A Debate. Blackwell.
    Written in the form of a debate, this volume presents a clear survey and assessment of the main arguments, both for and against each of these three central ...
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  14. Robert M. Barry (1964). "Kant's Theory of Knowledge: An Outline of One Central Argument in the 'Critique of Pure Reason,'" by Graham Bird. Modern Schoolman 41 (3):282-285.
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  15. Kenneth Baynes (1989). Christine M. Korsgaard. The Monist 72 (3).
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  16. Avner Baz (2008). Being Right, and Being in the Right. Inquiry 51 (6):627 – 644.
    This paper presents a critique of a prevailing conception of the relation between moral reasoning and judgment on the one hand, and moral goodness on the other. I argue that moral reasoning is inescapably vulnerable to moral, as opposed to merely theoretical, failure. This, I argue, means that there is something deeply misleading in the way that Kant's moral theory, and some of its main rivals, have invited us to conceive of their subject matter.
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  17. Roi Benbassat (2012). Kierkegaard's Relation to Kantian Ethics Reconsidered. Kierkegaard Studies Yearbook 2012 (1).
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  18. Monika Betzler (ed.) (2008). Kant's Ethics of Virtues. Walter De Gruyter.
  19. Rüdiger Bittner (1980). Hypothetische Imperative. Zeitschrift für Philosophische Forschung 34 (2):210 - 226.
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  20. Omri Boehm (2012). Kant and Spinozism: Trancendental Idealism and Immanence From Jacobi to Deleuze. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 20 (5):1041-1045.
    British Journal for the History of Philosophy, Volume 0, Issue 0, Page 1-4, Ahead of Print.
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  21. E. J. Bond (1968). The Supreme Principle of Morality. Dialogue 7 (02):167-179.
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  22. Maria Borges (2008). Actions and Feelings: Série 2. Kant E-Prints 3:115-122.
    In this paper, I analyze Kant’s theory of action and if human beings can act morally without being moved by sensible feelings. I will show that the answer of the Critique of Pure Reason, Groundwork and the Critical of Practical Reason is without any doubt “yes”, but Kant is ambiguous in the Metaphysics of Morals and also in the Anthropology. In the Metaphysics of Morals, Kant claims that there are some sensible conditions to the reception of the concept of duty: (...)
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  23. Matthew Braham & Martin van Hees (2015). The Formula of Universal Law: A Reconstruction. Erkenntnis 80 (2):243-260.
    This paper provides a methodologically original construction of Kant’s “Formula of Universal Law” . A formal structure consisting of possible worlds and games—a “game frame”—is used to implement Kant’s concept of a maxim and to define the two tests FUL comprises: the “contradiction in conception” and “contradiction in the will” tests. The paper makes two contributions. Firstly, the model provides a formal account of the variables that are built into FUL: agents, maxims, intentions, actions, and outcomes. This establishes a clear (...)
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  24. Marilea Bramer (2010). The Importance of Personal Relationships in Kantian Moral Theory: A Reply to Care Ethics. Hypatia 25 (1):121-139.
    Care ethicists have long insisted that Kantian moral theory fails to capture the partiality that ought to be present in our personal relationships. In her most recent book, Virginia Held claims that, unlike impartial moral theories, care ethics guides us in how we should act toward friends and family. Because these actions are performed out of care, they have moral value for a care ethicist. The same actions, Held claims, would not have moral worth for a Kantian because of the (...)
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  25. Johan Brännmark (2002). Morality and the Pursuit of Happiness: A Study in Kantian Ethics. Dissertation, Lund University
    This work seeks to develop a Kantian ethical theory in terms of a general ontology of values and norms together with a metaphysics of the person that makes sense of this ontology. It takes as its starting point Kant’s assertion that a good will is the only thing that has an unconditioned value and his accompanying view that the highest good consists in virtue and happiness in proportion to virtue. The soundness of Kant’s position on the value of the good (...)
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  26. Samantha Brennan (2001). Arthur Ripstein, Equality, Responsibility, and the Law Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 21 (4):288-290.
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  27. Samantha Brennan (2001). Arthur Ripstein, Equality, Responsibility, and the Law. [REVIEW] Philosophy in Review 21:288-290.
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  28. Talbot Brewer (2001). Rethinking Our Maxims: Perceptual Salience and Practical Judgment in Kantian Ethics. [REVIEW] Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 4 (3):219-230.
    Some contemporary Kantians have argued that one could not be virtuous without having internalized certain patterns of awareness that permit one to identify and respond reliably to moral reasons for action. I agree, but I argue that this insight requires unrecognized, farreaching, and thoroughly welcome changes in the traditional Kantian understanding of maxims and virtues. In particular, it implies that one''s characteristic emotions and desires will partly determine one''s maxims, and hence the praiseworthiness of one''s actions. I try to show (...)
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  29. B. Bright (1989). The Epistemological Imperative. In Barry P. Bright (ed.), Theory and Practice in the Study of Adult Education: The Epistemological Debate. Routledge.
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  30. Thom Brooks (2003). Kant's Theory of Punishment. Utilitas 15 (02):206-.
    The most widespread interpretation amongst contemporary theorists of Kant's theory of punishment is that it is retributivist. On the contrary, I will argue there are very different senses in which Kant discusses punishment. He endorses retribution for moral law transgressions and consequentialist considerations for positive law violations. When these standpoints are taken into consideration, Kant's theory of punishment is more coherent and unified than previously thought. This reading uncovers a new problem in Kant's theory of punishment. By assuming a potential (...)
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  31. Samuel V. Bruton (2003). Philip Stratton-Lake, Kant, Duty and Moral Worth, London, Routledge, 2000, Pp. Xi + 153. Utilitas 15 (2):248-249.
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  32. Samuel V. Bruton (2003). Marcia W. Baron, Kantian Ethics Almost Without Apology, Ithaca, N.Y., Cornell University Press, 1995, Pp. Xiii + 244. Utilitas 15 (01):121-.
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  33. P. Burcher (2012). The Noncompliant Patient: A Kantian and Levinasian Response. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 37 (1):74-89.
    When a patient fails to follow the advice or prescription of a physician, she is termed to be "noncompliant" by the medical community. The medical community’s response to and understanding of patient noncompliance fails to acknowledge noncompliance as either a relational failure between physician and patient or as a patient choice. I offer an analysis of Immanuel Kant and Emmanuel Levinas that refocuses the issue of noncompliance by examining the physician role, the doctor–patient relationship, and the nature of responsibility.
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  34. Alex Burri & Jürg Freudiger (1990). Zur Analytizität Hypothetischer Imperative. Zeitschrift für Philosophische Forschung 44 (1):98 - 105.
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  35. Steven M. Cahn (2009). A Supreme Moral Principle? In , Exploring Philosophy: An Introductory Anthology. Oxford University Press.
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  36. Lenval A. Callender (2013). Puzzle Maxims and the Formula of Universal Law. In Margit Ruffing, Claudio La Rocca, Alfredo Ferrarin & Stefano Bacin (eds.), Kant Und Die Philosophie in Weltbürgerlicher Absicht: Akten des Xi. Kant-Kongresses 2010. De Gruyter. 97-108.
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  37. George Cavallar (1993). Kantian Ethics and Socialism. International Studies in Philosophy 25 (1):112-112.
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  38. Fldvia Carvalho Chagas (2008). The Fact of Reason and the Feeling of Respect. In Valerio Hrsg V. Rohden, Ricardo Terra & Guido Almeida (eds.), Recht Und Frieden in der Philosophie Kants. 83.
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  39. Evgenia Cherkasova (2005). On the Boundary of Intelligibility. Review of Metaphysics 58 (3):571 - 584.
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  40. Michael Clark (2005). Kantian Punishment: Rejoinder to Brooks. Ratio 18 (3):361–364.
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  41. Ardis B. Collins (1983). Kant's Conceptions of the Categorical Imperative and the Will. By T. N. Pelegrinis. Modern Schoolman 60 (2):138-139.
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  42. Vincent M. Cooke (1992). Kant's Theory of Freedom. International Philosophical Quarterly 32 (1):128-130.
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  43. Dennis R. Cooley (2007). A Kantian Moral Duty for the Soon-to-Be Demented to Commit Suicide. American Journal of Bioethics 7 (6):37 – 44.
    It has been argued that, on Kantian grounds, pedophiles, rapists and murderers are morally obligated to take their own lives prior to committing a violent action that will end their moral agency. That is, to avoid destroying the agent's moral life by performing a morally suicidal action, the agent, while he still is a moral agent, should end his body's life. Although the cases of dementia and the morally reprehensible are vastly different, this Kantian interpretation might be useful in the (...)
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  44. Drucilla Cornell (1995). Response to Thomas Mccarthy: The Political Alliance Between Ethical Feminism and Rawls's Kantian Constructivism. Constellations 2 (2):189-206.
  45. M. Corradi (1988). The Categorical Imperative in the Foundation of Kant'metafisica Dei Costumi'. Rivista di Filosofia Neo-Scolastica 80 (2):223-241.
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  46. L. L. D. (1980). Kant's Moral Philosophy, an Interpretation of the Categorical Imperative. Review of Metaphysics 34 (1):158-159.
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  47. Johnny Antonio Dávila (2011). Some Considerations on the Feeling of Respect for the Moral Law. Discusiones Filosóficas 12 (18):145 - 154.
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  48. A. E. Denham & S. Farelly-Jackson (1996). Kant and Contemporary Moral Philosophy. In Alan Montefiore & V. Muresan (eds.), Contemporary British Moral Philosophy. Editura Alternative.
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  49. Lara Denis (2008). Animality and Agency: A Kantian Approach to Abortion. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 76 (1):117-37.
    This paper situates abortion in the context of women’s duties to themselves. I argue that Kant’s fundamental moral requirement (found in the formula of humanity) to respect oneself as a rational being, combined with Kant’s view of our animal nature, form the basis for a view of pregnancy and abortion that focuses on women’s agency and moral character without diminishing the importance of their bodies and emotions. The Kantian view of abortion that emerges takes abortion to be morally problematic, but (...)
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  50. Lara Denis (2007). Abortion and Kant's Formula of Universal Law. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 37 (4):547-579.
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