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Kantian Ethics

Edited by Sven Nyholm (Eindhoven University of Technology)
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  1. G. Giesmann (2002). The Formulations of the Categorical Imperative According to HJ Paton, Anonymous, Klaus Reich and Julius Ebbinghaus. Kant-Studien 93 (3):374-384.
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  2. Joshua Glasgow (2007). Kant's Conception of Humanity. Journal of the History of Philosophy 45 (2):291-308.
    Contemporary Kant scholarship generally takes Kant’s conception of humanity in his ethical writings to refer to beings with rational capacities. 1 According to this interpretation, when Kant tells us in the Categorical Imperative’s Formula of Humanity [FH] to “act so that you use humanity…always at the same time as an end, never merely as a means,” we are to treat anyone with rational capacities this way. 2 However, Richard Dean has recently revived an alternative interpretation that he traces to H. (...)
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  3. W. D. Glasgow (1969). The Concept of the Categorical Imperative. Philosophical Books 10 (3):28-30.
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  4. Vasil Gluchman (2008). Human Dignity and its Non-Utilitarian Consequentialist Aspects. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 10:127-133.
    According to author, value of human dignity has its place in his ethics of social consequences which is a form of non-utilitarian consequentialism. This is so because it is compatible with the value of positive consequences that creates one of the crucial criteria in ethics of social consequences. There exist two aspects of human dignity in this ethical theory. The first is related to the value of life that is worthy of esteem and respect, which brings positive consequences (moral biocentrism), (...)
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  5. Loren Goldman (2012). In Defense of Blinders: On Kant, Political Hope, and the Need for Practical Belief. Political Theory 40 (4):497 - 523.
    Kant's progressive philosophy of history is an integral aspect of his critical system, yet it is often ignored or even treated as an embarrassment by contemporary scholars. In this article, I defend Kant and argue for the continuing relevance of his regulative assumption of historical progress. I suggest, furthermore, that the first-person stance of practical belief exemplified in Kant's conception of hope offers new resources for thinking about the relationship between the ideal and the real in political theory.
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  6. Christopher W. Gowans (2008). The Value of Humanity in Kant's Moral Theory—Richard Dean. International Philosophical Quarterly 48 (1):107-109.
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  7. Michael K. Green (1982). Using Nature to Typify Freedom: The Application of the Categorical Imperative. International Studies in Philosophy 14 (1):17-26.
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  8. Mary Gregor (1989). Kantian Ethics and Socialism. Review of Metaphysics 42 (4):856-858.
  9. Dirk Greimann (2003). Kants Derivation of the Formula of the Categorical Imperative From Its Mere Concept. Logical Analysis and History of Philosophy 6.
    This paper aims to reconstruct Kant’s derivation with the help of the resources of speech act theory. The main exegetical hypothesis is that the derivation envisaged by Kant consists in deriving the formula from the success-conditions of giving categorical imperatives. These conditions, which are analogous to the success-conditions of giving ordinary orders, contain restrictions for the successful construction of a system of moral laws that determine what the content of moral laws must be.
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  10. Martin Gunderson (2004). A Kantian View of Suicide and End-of-Life Treatment. Journal of Social Philosophy 35 (2):277–287.
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  11. William S. Hamrick (1983). Humanity, Nature, and Respect for Law. Analecta Husserliana 14:245.
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  12. John E. Hare (2011). Ethics and Religion: Two Kantian Arguments. Philosophical Investigations 34 (2):151-168.
    This paper describes and defends two arguments connecting ethics and religion that Kant makes in Religion within the Boundaries of Mere Reason. The first argument is that the moral demand is too high for us in our natural capacities, and God's assistance is required to bridge the resulting moral gap. The second argument is that because humans desire to be happy as well as to be morally good, morality will be rationally unstable without belief in a God who can bring (...)
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  13. R. M. Hare (1993). Could Kant Have Been A Utilitarian? Utilitas 5 (01):1.
    … the supreme end, the happiness of all mankind (Kr V A851/NKS 665).
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  14. John Harris (2012). Can Kant's Three Formulations of the Categorical Imperative Be Unified? Southwest Philosophy Review 28 (2):91-94.
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  15. John C. Harsanyi (1958). Ethics in Terms of Hypothetical Imperatives. Mind 67 (267):305-316.
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  16. Jeffrey Hart (1993). The Civilised Imperative. In Jesse Norman (ed.), The Achievement of Michael Oakeshott. Duckworth.
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  17. Dietmar Heidemann (ed.) (2012). Kant and Contemporary Moral Philosophy. De Gruyter.
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  18. Tim Henning (2011). Why Be Yourself? Kantian Respect and Frankfurtian Identification. Philosophical Quarterly 61 (245):725-745.
    Harry Frankfurt has claimed that some of our desires are ‘internal’, i.e., our own in a special sense. I defend the idea that a desire's being internal matters in a normative, reasons-involving sense, and offer an explanation for this fact. The explanation is Kantian in spirit. We have reason to respect the desires of persons in so far as respecting them is a way to respect the persons who have them (in some cases, ourselves). But if desires matter normatively in (...)
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  19. Larry J. Herrera (1996). Kant on the Subjective Conditions of Moral Performance. Dissertation, Yale University
    In recent years, scholars have put forth a formidable defense of Kant's views on moral motivation. Their common goal has been to disclose the emotional dimension of his practical philosophy, an aspect of his thought arguably concealed by a couple of centuries of wrongheaded criticism. Yet a systematic study of the subjective factors that underlie moral performance as Kant understood it was missing. This dissertation tries to fill that gap. I reconstruct his theory of moral performance since 1755, and show (...)
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  20. Friedrich Heubel (2008). Kant's Categorical Imperative-a Tool for Hospital Management and Marketing? Ethik in der Medizin 20 (2):86-93.
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  21. Thomas Hill (2008). Kantian Virtue and Virtue Ethics. In Monika Betzler (ed.), Kant's Ethics of Virtues. Walter De Gruyter.
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  22. Thomas E. Hill (2002). Human Welfare and Moral Worth: Kantian Perspectives. Oxford University Press.
    Thomas Hill, a leading figure in the recent development of Kantian moral philosophy, presents a set of essays exploring the implications of basic Kantian ideas for practical issues. The first part of the book provides background in central themes in Kant's ethics; the second part discusses questions regarding human welfare; the third focuses on moral worth-the nature and grounds of moral assessment of persons as deserving esteem or blame. Hill shows moral, political, and social philosophers just how valuable moral theory (...)
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  23. Alison Hills (2004). Is Ethics Rationally Required? Inquiry 47 (1):1 – 19.
    Sidgwick argued that utilitarianism was not rationally required because it could not be shown that a utilitarian theory of practical reason was better justified than a rival egoist theory of practical reason: there is a 'dualism of practical reason' between utilitarianism and egoism. In this paper, it is demonstrated that the dualism argument also applies to Kant's moral theory, the moral law. A prudential theory that is parallel to the moral law is devised, and it is argued that the moral (...)
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  24. R. F. Alfred Hoernlé (1939). Kant's Theory of Freedom. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 20 (4):391.
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  25. O. Hoffe (1989). Retaliatory Punishment as a Categorical Imperative. Rivista Internazionale di Filosofia Del Diritto 66 (4):633-658.
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  26. Otfried Höffe (2013). Kantian Ethics. In Roger Crisp (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of the History of Ethics. Oxford University Press.
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  27. W. Michael Hoffman (1975). An Interpretation of Kant's Causal Determinism. Idealistic Studies 5 (2):139-163.
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  28. Robert L. Holmes (1974). Is Morality a System of Hypothetical Imperatives? Analysis 34 (3):96 - 100.
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  29. Sarah Williams Holtman (1997). Toward Social Reform: Kant's Penal Theory Reinterpreted. Utilitas 9 (01):3-.
    Here I set the stage for developing a Kantian account of punishment attuned to social and economic injustice and to the need for prison reform. I argue that we cannot appreciate Kant's own discussion of punishment unless we read it in light of the theory of justice of which it is a part and the fundamental commitments of that theory to freedom, autonomy and equality. As important, we cannot properly evaluate Kant's advocacy of the law of retribution unless we recognize (...)
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  30. Stephen Houlgate (1992). Kant's Theory of Freedom. Philosophical Books 33 (1):14-17.
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  31. Jason J. Howard (2004). Kant and Moral Imputation. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 78 (4):609-627.
    This article examines a largely neglected theme in Kant scholarship, which concerns the importance of conscience in understanding Kant’s account of moral imputation. It is my contention that conscience, contrary to many traditional interpretations of Kant, plays a central role in grasping the lived experience of moral agency insofar as it brings into light the burden that autonomy places upon us. When approached from this angle, Kant’s account of conscience, far from undermining the coherence of his position, actually bolsters it (...)
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  32. George E. Hughes (1944). Motive and Duty. Mind 53 (212):314-331.
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  33. William H. Hughes (1998). David Dyzenhaus and Arthur Ripstein, Eds., Law and Morality: Readings in Legal Philosophy Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 18 (1):22-24.
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  34. Christian F. R. Illies (1995). An Essay in Kantian Ethics a New Interpretation and Justification of the Categorical Imperative.
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  35. Pier Jaarsma, Petra Gelhaus & Stellan Welin (2012). Living the Categorical Imperative: Autistic Perspectives on Lying and Truth Telling–Between Kant and Care Ethics. [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 15 (3):271-277.
    Lying is a common phenomenon amongst human beings. It seems to play a role in making social interactions run more smoothly. Too much honesty can be regarded as impolite or downright rude. Remarkably, lying is not a common phenomenon amongst normally intelligent human beings who are on the autism spectrum. They appear to be ‘attractively morally innocent’ and seem to have an above average moral conscientious objection against deception. In this paper, the behavior of persons with autism with regard to (...)
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  36. Reginald Jackson (1942). Kant's Distinction Between Categorical and Hypothetical Imperatives. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 43:131 - 166.
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  37. Henning Jensen (1989). Kant and Moral Integrity. Philosophical Studies 57 (2):193 - 205.
    A main objection – perhaps the foremost – to Kant's theory of moral worth is that whereas he claims that only actions performed from the motive of duty have moral worth, most people are convinced that right actions performed out of.
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  38. Oliver A. Johnson (1981). Kant's Theory of Freedom. International Studies in Philosophy 13 (1):101-102.
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  39. Robert Johnson, The Good of Self-Development.
    So Michael Slote argues. There is and can be no obligation to foster one's own wellbeing for Kantians, only an obligation to foster the wellbeing of others. And any distinctively Kantian position both denies that our own wellbeing is the source of our moral duties and denies that a concern for wellbeing can be a morally worthy motive. So not only is the agent's own good not foundational to morality; it is of no moral importance. Hence, Slote concludes, the devaluation (...)
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  40. Robert N. Johnson (2007). Value and Autonomy in Kantian Ethics. In Russ Shafer-Landau (ed.), Oxford Studies in Metaethics. Clarendon Press.
  41. James N. Jordan (1980). On Justifying the Categorical Imperative. Modern Schoolman 57 (3):243-258.
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  42. Lawrence J. Jost & Julian Wuerth (eds.) (2011). Perfecting Virtue: New Essays on Kantian Ethics and Virtue Ethics. Cambridge University Press.
    Machine generated contents note: Contributors; Method of citing Aristotle's works; Method of citing Kant's works; Introduction; 1. Virtue ethics in relation to Kantian ethics: an opinionated overview and commentary Marcia Baron; 2. What does the Aristotelian Phronimos know? Rosalind Hursthouse; 3. Kant and agent-oriented ethics Allen Wood; 4. The difference that ends make Barbara Herman; 5. Two pictures of practical thinking Talbot Brewer; 6. Moving beyond Kant's moral agent in the Grounding Julian Wuerth; 7. A Kantian conception of human flourishing (...)
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  43. Daniel Kading (1960). Are There Really "No Duties to Oneself"? Ethics 70 (2):155-157.
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  44. F. E. Kaldewaij, The Animal in Morality. Justifying Duties to Animals in Kantian Moral Philosophy.
    This dissertation investigates the issue of our moral duties to animals in the context of Kantian moral philosophy. Kantian arguments promise a fundamental and neutral justification of moral duties. Kantians traditionally hold that rational capacities that only humans seem to possess are necessary for moral status. This dissertation challenges this view. It is argued that if Kantian arguments justify duties to others at all, they also justify duties to animals. The first part of the dissertation argues that the Kantian view (...)
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  45. Alex Karolis (2008). Kant's Politics: Provisional Theory for an Uncertain World. Contemporary Political Theory 7 (1):111.
  46. Jason Kawall (2004). Moral Response-Dependence, Ideal Observers, and the Motive of Duty: Responding to Zangwill. [REVIEW] Erkenntnis 60 (3):357-369.
    Moral response-dependent metaethical theories characterize moral properties in terms of the reactions of certain classes of individuals. Nick Zangwill has argued that such theories are flawed: they are unable to accommodate the motive of duty. That is, they are unable to provide a suitable reason for anyone to perform morally right actions simply because they are morally right. I argue that Zangwill ignores significant differences between various approvals, and various individuals, and that moral response-dependent theories can accommodate the motive of (...)
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  47. Meena Kelkar (1987). Formulations of the Categorical Imperative. Indian Philosophical Quarterly 14 (3):267.
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  48. Ryan Kemp (2011). The Contingency of Evil: Rethinking the Problem of Universal Evil in Kant's 'Religion'. In Oliver Thorndike (ed.), Rethinking Kant: Volume 3. Cambridge Scholars.
    In this paper I explore how three seemingly incompatible Kantian theses–a libertarian notion of freedom, the inscrutability of one’s fundamental moral maxim, and the ubiquity of evil–can each be maintained without contradiction. I do this by arguing against the popular notion that in his 'Religion within the Bounds of Mere Reason,' Kant attributes 'radical evil' to all human beings.
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  49. Samuel Kerstein (2009). Treating Others Merely as Means. Utilitas 21 (2):163-180.
    In the Formula of Humanity, Kant embraces the principle that it is wrong for us to treat others merely as means. For contemporary Kantian ethicists, this Mere Means Principle plays the role of a moral constraint: it limits what we may do, even in the service of promoting the overall good. But substantive interpretations of the principle generate implausible results in relatively ordinary cases. On one interpretation, for example, you treat your opponent in a tennis tournament merely as a means (...)
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  50. E. R. Klein (2007). Space Exploration: Humanity's Single Most Important Moral Imperative. Philosophy Now 61:8-10.
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