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  1. Erich Adickes (1922). Zur Lehre von der Wärme von Fr. Bacon Bis Kant. Kant-Studien 27 (1-2):328-368.
  2. Lewis White Beck (1988). The Extraterrestrial Life Debate. 1750-1900. The Idea of a Plurality of Worlds From Kant to Lowell. Journal of the History of Philosophy 26 (2):324-326.
  3. Graham Bird (ed.) (2006). A Companion to Kant. Blackwell Pub..
    This Companion provides an authoritative survey of the whole range of Kant’s work, giving readers an idea of its immense scope, its extraordinary achievement, and its continuing ability to generate philosophical interest. Written by an international cast of scholars. Covers all the major works of the critical philosophy, as well as the pre-critical works. Subjects covered range from mathematics and philosophy of science, through epistemology and metaphysics, to moral and political philosophy.
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  4. Giovanni Boniolo (2007). On Scientific Representations: From Kant to a New Philosophy of Science. Palgrave Macmillan.
    Scientific concepts, laws, theories, models and thought experiments are representations but uniquely different. In On Scientific Representation each is given a full philosophical exploration within an original, coherent philosophical framework that is strongly rooted in the Kantian tradition (Kant, Hertz, Vaihinger, Cassirer). Through a revisionist historical approach, Boniolo shows how the Kantian tradition can help us renew and rethink contemporary issues in epistemology and the philosophy of science.
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  5. Angela Breitenbach (2006). Mechanical Explanation of Nature and its Limits in Kant's Critique of Judgment. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 37 (4):694-711.
  6. Angela Breitenbach (2005). Kant Goes Fishing: Kant and the Right to Property in Environmental Resources. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 36 (3):488-512.
  7. Andrew Brook (2004). Kant, Cognitive Science and Contemporary Neo-Kantianism. Journal of Consciousness Studies 11 (10-11):10-11.
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  8. Andrew Brook (2003). Kant and Cognitive Science. Teleskop.
    Some of Kant's ideas about the mind have had a huge influence on cognitive science, in particular his view that sensory input has to be worked up using concepts or concept-like states and his conception of the mind as a system of cognitive functions. We explore these influences in the first part of the paper. Other ideas of Kant's about the mind have not been assimilated into cognitive science, including important ideas about processes of synthesis, mental unity, and consciousness and (...)
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  9. Luigi Caranti (2005). Logical Purposiveness and the Principle of Taste. Kant-Studien 96 (3):364-374.
    In both Introductions to the Critique of Judgment Kant seems to identify the a priori principle at the basis of aesthetic judgments with the principle that guides reflective judgment in its cognitive inquiry of nature, i.e. the purposiveness of nature or systematicity. For instance Kant writes.
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  10. Alix Cohen (2009). Kant and the Human Sciences: Biology, Anthropology and History. Palgrave Macmillan.
    Machine generated contents note: Freedom and the Human Sciences * The Model of Biological Science and its Implications for the Human Sciences * The Answer to the Question What Is Man? * Pragmatic Anthropology * Philosophical History * Conclusion * Bibliography Freedom and the Human Sciences * The Model of Biological Science and its Implications for the Human Sciences * The Answer to the Question What Is Man? * Pragmatic Anthropology * Philosophical History * Conclusion * Bibliography.
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  11. Alix Cohen (2006). Kant on Epigenesis, Monogenesis and Human Nature. Studies in History and Philosophy of the Biological and Biomedical Sciences 37 (4):675-693.
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  12. Alix A. Cohen (2008). Kant's Answer to the Question 'What is Man?' And its Implications for Anthropology. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 39 (4):506-514.
  13. Richard Creath (2010). The Construction of Reason: Kant, Carnap, Kuhn, and Beyond. In Michael Friedman, Mary Domski & Michael Dickson (eds.), Discourse on a New Method: Reinvigorating the Marriage of History and Philosophy of Science. Open Court.
  14. Mauro Dorato, Kant, Goedel and Relativity.
    Since the onset of logical positivism, the general wisdom of the philosophy of science has it that the kantian philosophy of (space and) time has been superseded by the theory of relativity, in the same sense in which the latter has replaced Newton’s theory of absolute space and time. On the wake of Cassirer and Gödel, in this paper I raise doubts on this commonplace by suggesting some conditions that are necessary to defend the ideality of time in the sense (...)
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  15. John Earman (1971). Kant, Incongruous Counterparts, and the Nature of Space. Ratio 13:1--18.
  16. Lorne Falkenstein (1998). A Double Edged Sword? Kant's Refutation of Mendelssohn's Proof of the Immortality of the Soul and its Implications for His Theory of Matter. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 29 (4):561-588.
  17. Mark Fisher & Eric Watkins (1998). Kant on the Material Ground of Possibility: From "The Only Possible Argument" to the "Critique of Pure Reason". Review of Metaphysics 52 (2):369 - 395.
  18. Steven French & Michela Massimi (2013). Philosophy of Science A Personal Peek Into the Future. Metaphilosophy 44 (3):230-240.
    In this opinion piece, the authors offer their personal and idiosyncratic views of the future of the philosophy of science, focusing on its relationship with the history of science and metaphysics, respectively. With regard to the former, they suggest that the Kantian tradition might be drawn upon both to render the history and philosophy of science more relevant to philosophy as a whole and to overcome the challenges posed by naturalism. When it comes to the latter, they suggest both that (...)
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  19. Marco Giovanelli (2010). Urbild Und Abbild. Leibniz, Kant Und Hausdorff Über Das Raumproblem: The Original and the Copy. Leibniz, Kant and Hausdorff on the Problem of Space. Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 41 (2):283 - 313.
    The article attempts to reconsider the relationship between Leibniz's and Kant's philosophy of geometry on the one hand and the nineteenth century debate on the foundation of geometry on the other. The author argues that the examples used by Leibniz and Kant to explain the peculiarity of the geometrical way of thinking are actually special cases of what the Jewish-German mathematician Felix Hausdorff called "transformation principle", the very same principle that thinkers such as Helmholtz or Poincaré applied in a more (...)
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  20. Marco Giovanelli (2010). Urbild Und Abbild. Leibniz, Kant Und Hausdorff Über Das Raumproblem. Journal for General Philosophy of Science 41 (2):283-313.
    The article attempts to reconsider the relationship between Leibniz’s and Kant’s philosophy of geometry on the one hand and the nineteenth century debate on the foundation of geometry on the other. The author argues that the examples used by Leibniz and Kant to explain the peculiarity of the geometrical way of thinking are actually special cases of what the Jewish-German mathematician Felix Hausdorff called “transformation principle”, the very same principle that thinkers such as Helmholtz or Poincaré applied in a more (...)
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  21. Paul Guyer (2001). Organisms and the Unity of Science. In Eric Watkins (ed.), Kant and the Sciences. Oxford University Press. 259--281.
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  22. Bryan Hall (2007). Kant, Science and Human Nature. Review of Metaphysics 61 (2):424-425.
  23. Patricia Kauark-Leite (2009). The Transcendental Role of the Principle of Anticipations of Perception in Quantum Mechanics. In Michel Bitbol, Jean Petitot & Pierre Kerszberg (eds.), CONSTITUTING OBJECTIVITY The Western Ontario Series in Philosophy of Science.
    The aim of this work is to analyse the diffrerences between the formal structure of anticipation of perception in classical and in quantum context. I argue that a transcendental point of view can be supported in quantum context if objectivity is defined by an invariant anticipative structure, which has only a predictive character. The classical objectivity, which defined a set of properties having a descriptive meaning must be abandoned in quantum context. I will focus my analysis on Kant's Principle of (...)
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  24. Frode Kjosavik (2009). Kant on Geometrical Intuition and the Foundations of Mathematics. Kant-Studien 100 (1):1-27.
    It is argued that geometrical intuition, as conceived in Kant, is still crucial to the epistemological foundations of mathematics. For this purpose, I have chosen to target one of the most sympathetic interpreters of Kant's philosophy of mathematics – Michael Friedman – because he has formulated the possible historical limitations of Kant's views most sharply. I claim that there are important insights in Kant's theory that have survived the developments of modern mathematics, and thus, that they are not so intrinsically (...)
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  25. Brandon C. Look (2006). Blumenbach and Kant on Mechanism and Teleology in Nature: The Case of the Formative Drive. In Justin E. H. Smith (ed.), The Problem of Animal Generation in Early Modern Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.
  26. Jean-François Lyotard (1994). Lessons on the Analytic of the Sublime: Kant's Critique of Judgment, [Sections] 23-29. Stanford University Press.
    Philosophical aesthetics have seen an amazing revival over the past decade, as a radical questioning of the very grounds of Western epistemology has revealed that descriptions of what used to be seen as specific to aesthetic experience can instead be viewed as a general model for human cognition. In this revival, no text in the classical corpus of Western philosophy has been more frequently discussed and debated than the dense, complex paragraphs inserted into Kant's Critique of Judgment as sections 23-29: (...)
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  27. M. Massimi (2008). " The Relevance of Kant's Philosophy for the Physical Sciences of Nineteenth Century". Review of M. Friedman and A. Nordmann (Eds.)" The Kantian Legacy in Nineteenth Century Science"(MIT Press). [REVIEW] Metascience 17:79-83.
  28. Michela Massimi (2014). Natural Kinds and Naturalised Kantianism. Noûs 48 (3):416-449.
  29. Richard McDonough (2014). Kant's Emergence and Sellarsian Cognitive Science. Open Journal of Philosophy 4 (1):44-53.
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  30. Richard McDonough (1995). Kant's “Historicist” Alternative to Cognitive Science. Southern Journal of Philosophy 33 (2):203-220.
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  31. Jennifer McRobert (1987). The Construction of Empirical Concepts and the Establishment of the Real Possibility of Empirical Lawlikeness in Kant's Philosophy of Science. Dissertation, Dalhousie University
    In Chapter I, I discuss Buchdahl’s view that the possibility of empirical lawlikeness could not have been established in the Principles of the Critique given the differences between transcendental, metaphysical and empirical lawlikeness, and the connection between the faculty of Reason and empirical lawlikeness. I then discuss the general conditions for empirical hypotheses according to Kant, which include the justification of the method by which an empirical hypothesis is obtained and the establishment of the general and specific constructability of the (...)
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  32. Margaret Morrison (2008). Reduction, Unity and the Nature of Science: Kant's Legacy? Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 83 (63):37-62.
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  33. E. W. Orth (2002). Ubiquity of Philosophy-Science and Sciences in Neokantianism. Kant-Studien 93 (1):113-121.
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  34. Peter Ospald (2010). Michael Friedmans Behandlung Des unterschieDes Zwischen Arithmetik Und Algebra Bei Kant in Kant and the Exact Sciences. Kant-Studien 101 (1):75-88.
    In the second chapter of his book Kant and the Exact Sciences Michael Friedman deals with two different interpretations of the relation or the difference between algebra and arithmetic in Kant's thought. According to the first interpretation algebra can be described as general arithmetic because it generalizes over all numbers by the use of variables, whereas arithmetic only deals with particular numbers. The alternative suggestion is that algebra is more general than arithmetic because it considers a more general class of (...)
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  35. Stephen Palmquist, Kant On Euclid: Geometry in Perspective.
    There is a common assumption among philosophers, shared even by many Kant scholars, that Kant had a naive faith in the absolute valid­ity of Euclidean geometry, Aristotelian logic, and Newtonian physics, and that his primary goal in the Critique of Pure Reason was to pro­vide a rational foundation upon which these classical scientific theories could be based. This, it might be thought, is the essence of his attempt to solve the problem which, as he says in a footnote to the (...)
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  36. Charles Parsons (2012). From Kant to Husserl: Selected Essays. Harvard University Press.
    The transcendental aesthetic -- Arithmetic and the categories -- Remarks on pure natural science -- Two studies in the reception of Kant's philosophy of arithmetic: postscript to part I -- Some remarks on Frege's conception of extension -- Postscript to essay 5 -- Frege's correspondence: postscript to essay 6 -- Brentano on judgment and truth -- Husserl and the linguistic turn.
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  37. Horst Pfeiffle (2008). On the Psychogenesis of the a Priori: Jean Piaget's Critique of Kant. Philosophy and Social Criticism 34 (5):487-498.
    The seal of the a priori is imprinted on the reception of Kant's philosophy. Piaget's epistemological argumentation seems to ascribe knowledge a more fruitful constructiveness than Kant, seeing the a priori as rooted in unvarying reason. Yet, it seems, he failed to recognize the complexity of Kant's theory, which does not always follow a quid iuris line. Moments of experience, analysis and self-observation played more than a marginal role in his discovery of the a priori. Indeed, Kant himself raises the (...)
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  38. A. R. (2003). The Cognition-Knowledge Distinction in Kant and Dilthey and the Implications for Psychology and Self-Understanding. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 34 (1):149-164.
    Both Kant and Dilthey distinguish between cognition and knowledge, but they do so differently in accordance with their respective theoretical interests. Kant's primary cognitive interest is in the natural sciences, and from this perspective the status of psychology is questioned because its phenomena are not mathematically measurable. Dilthey, by contrast, reconceives psychology as a human science.For Kant, knowledge is conceptual cognition that has attained certainty by being part of a rational system. Dilthey also links knowledge with certainty; however, he derives (...)
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  39. J. R. (2000). Kant and Blumenbach on the Bildungstrieb: A Historical Misunderstanding. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 31 (1):11-32.
  40. Robert J. Richards (2000). Kant and Blumenbach on the Bildungstrieb: A Historical Misunderstanding. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 31 (1):11-32.
  41. Alan W. Richardson (2003). Conceiving, Experiencing, and Conceiving Experiencing: Neo-Kantianism and the History of the Concept of Experience. [REVIEW] Topoi 22 (1):55-67.
    It is often claimed that epistemological thought divides around the issue of the place of experience in knowledge: While empiricists argue that experience is the only legitimate source of knowledge, rationalists find other such sources. The trouble with such accounts is not that they are wrong, but that they are incomplete. On occasion, epistemological differences run deeper, raising the very notion of experience as an issue for epistemology. This paper looks at two epistemological debates which concerned not simply the place (...)
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  42. Claudia M. Schmidt (2008). Kant's Transcendental and Empirical Psychology of Cognition. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 39 (4):462-472.
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  43. Phillip R. Sloan (2002). Performing the Categories: Eighteenth-Century Generation Theory and the Biological Roots of Kant's A Priori. Journal of the History of Philosophy 40 (2):229-253.
  44. Henry Michael Southgate (2013). Kant's Critique of Leibniz's Rejection of Real Opposition. Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science 3 (1):91-134.
  45. Marius Stan (2009). Kant's Early Theory of Motion. The Leibniz Review 19:29-61.
    This paper examines the young Kant’s claim that all motion is relative, and argues that it is the core of a metaphysical dynamics of impact inspired by Leibniz and Wolff. I start with some background to Kant’s early dynamics, and show that he rejects Newton’s absolute space as a foundation for it. Then I reconstruct the exact meaning of Kant’s relativity, and the model of impact he wants it to support. I detail (in Section II and III) his polemic engagement (...)
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  46. Joan Steigerwald (2006). Kant's Concept of Natural Purpose and the Reflecting Power of Judgement. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 37 (4):712-734.
  47. Thomas Sturm (2012). What's Philosophical About Kant's Philosophy of the Human Sciences? Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 43 (1):203-207.
  48. Thomas Sturm (2011). Freedom and the Human Sciences: Hume’s Science of Man Versus Kant’s Pragmatic Anthropology. Kant Yearbook 3 (1):23-42.
    In his Anthropology from a Pragmatic Point of View, Kant formulates the idea of the empirical investigation of the human being as a free agent. The notion is puzzling: Does Kant not often claim that, from an empirical point of view, human beings cannot be considered as free? What sense would it make anyway to include the notion of freedom in science? The answer to these questions lies in Kant’s notion of character. While probably all concepts of character are involved (...)
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  49. Thomas Sturm (2006). Is There a Problem with Mathematical Psychology in the Eighteenth Century? A Fresh Look at Kant’s Old Argument. . Journal of the History of the Behavioral Sciences 42:353-377.
    Common opinion ascribes to Immanuel Kant the view that psychology cannot become a science properly so called, because it cannot be mathematized. It is equally common to claim that this reflects the state of the art of his times; that the quantification of the mind was not achieved during the eighteenth century, while it was so during the nineteenth century; or that Kant's so-called “impossibility claim” was refuted by nineteenth-century developments, which in turn opened one path for psychology to become (...)
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  50. Thomas Sturm (2004). Manfred Kuehn: Kant - A Biography. [REVIEW] Philosophical Quarterly 54:476-479.
    Review of Manfred Kuehn's outstanding biography on Immanuel Kant. A critical point I raise concerns Kuehn's discussion of Kant's relation to Hume. Scholars are divided over the questions of (a) whether Hume was an actual inspiration for Kant’s Critical philosophy, (b) whether Kant’s defense really addresses Hume’s problem of causality, and, of course, (c) whether Kant’s arguments provide a satisfactory solution to the problem. Sometimes these questions are not clearly distinguished by interpreters, part of the reason Kant scholarship appears so (...)
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