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  1. Sven Arntzen (1996). Kant on Duty to Oneself and Resistance to Political Authority. Journal of the History of Philosophy 34 (3):409-424.
  2. Attila Ataner (2006). Kant on Capital Punishment and Suicide. Kant-Studien 97 (4):452-482.
    From a juridical standpoint, Kant ardently upholds the state's right to impose the death penalty in accordance with the law of retribution. At the same time, from an ethical standpoint, Kant maintains a strict proscription against suicide. The author proposes that this latter position is inconsistent with and undercuts the former. However, Kant's division between external (juridical) and internal (moral) lawgiving is an obstacle to any argument against Kant's endorsement of capital punishment based on his own disapprobation of suicide. Nevertheless, (...)
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  3. Peter Atterton (2007). A Duty to Be Charitable? A Rigoristic Reading of Kant. Kant-Studien 98 (2):135-155.
    To be beneficent, that is, to promote according to one's means the happiness of others in need, without hoping for something in return, is every man's duty. Immanuel Kant, The Metaphysics of Morals.
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  4. John A. Bailey (1982). Kant's Theory of Morals Bruce Aune Princeton University Press, 1979. Pp. 217. Cloth $16.50; Paper $4.95. [REVIEW] Dialogue 21 (02):360-364.
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  5. Anthony F. Beavers, Ethical Differentiation in Levinas, Kierkegaard and Kant.
    The goal of this paper is to locate the precise moment in which reason becomes endowed with an ought. In stating the goal in this way, something has already been said about Kant and his project of grounding the metaphysics of morals. But in speaking of a moment (or an instant or an event or an occasion) in which reason becomes endowed with an ought, that is, a moment in which pure reason becomes practical, we have already headed off in (...)
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  6. Heiner Bielefeldt (2003). Symbolic Representation in Kant's Practical Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.
    This book is the first to explore in detail the role that symbolic representation plays in the architecture of Kant's philosophy. Symbolic representation fulfills a crucial function in Kant's practical philosophy because it serves to mediate between the unconditionality of the categorical imperative and the inescapable finiteness of the human being. By showing how the nature of symbolic representation plays out across all areas of the practical philosophy - moral philosophy, legal philosophy, philosophy of history and philosophy of religion - (...)
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  7. Heiner Bielefeldt (2001). Hegelianizing Kant?: Allen W. Wood's Interpretation of Kant's Ethical Thought. [REVIEW] Canadian Journal of Philosophy 31 (3):445-451.
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  8. John Bourke (1942). Kant's Doctrine of "Perpetual Peace". Philosophy 17 (68):324 - 333.
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  9. Elizabeth Brake (2007). Marriage, Morality, and Institutional Value. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 10 (3):243 - 254.
    This paper develops a Kantian account of the moral assessment of institutions. The problem I address is this: while a deontological theory may find that some legal institutions are required by justice, it is not obvious how such a theory can assess institutions not strictly required (or prohibited) by justice. As a starting-point, I consider intuitions that in some cases it is desirable to attribute non-consequentialist moral value to institutions not required by justice. I will argue that neither consequentialist nor (...)
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  10. Daniel Breazeale (2001). J. G. Fichte, Review of Immanuel Kant,Perpetual Peace: A Philosophical Sketch (Königsburg: Nicolovius, 1795). Philosophical Forum 32 (4):311–321.
  11. Angela Breitenbach (2005). Kant Goes Fishing: Kant and the Right to Property in Environmental Resources. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 36 (3):488-512.
  12. Thom Brooks (2003). Kant's Theory of Punishment. Utilitas 15 (02):206-.
    The most widespread interpretation amongst contemporary theorists of Kant's theory of punishment is that it is retributivist. On the contrary, I will argue there are very different senses in which Kant discusses punishment. He endorses retribution for moral law transgressions and consequentialist considerations for positive law violations. When these standpoints are taken into consideration, Kant's theory of punishment is more coherent and unified than previously thought. This reading uncovers a new problem in Kant's theory of punishment. By assuming a potential (...)
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  13. B. Sharon Byrd (2010). Kant's Doctrine of Right: A Commentary. Cambridge University Press.
    Introduction and methods of interpretation -- The idea of the juridicial state and the postulate of public law -- The state of nature and the three leges -- Iustitia tutatrix, iustitia commutativa, and iustitia distributiva and their differences -- The right to freedom -- The permissive law in the Doctrine of right -- The external mine and thine -- Intelligible possession of land -- The "state in the idea" -- The state in reality -- International and cosmopolitan law -- The (...)
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  14. B. Sharon Byrd (1998). Kant's Theory of Contract. Southern Journal of Philosophy 36 (S1):131-153.
    First, this article considers Kant's rather odd requirement that every contract consist of four declarations of will: an offer, an approval of the offer, a promise and an acceptance of this promise. It explains Kant's theory as a stepping stone for Savigny's later development of the principle of abstraction, a principle which separates the contract of obligation from the contract of ownership transfer and makes the validity of each independent of the validity of the other. Second, the article interprets Kant's (...)
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  15. B. Sharon Byrd (1989). Kant's Theory of Punishment: Deterrence in its Threat, Retribution in its Execution. [REVIEW] Law and Philosophy 8 (2):151 - 200.
    Kant's theory of punishment is commonly regarded as purely retributive in nature, and indeed much of his discourse seems to support that interpretation. Still, it leaves one with certain misgivings regarding the internal consistency of his position. Perhaps the problem lies not in Kant's inconsistency nor in the senility sometimes claimed to be apparent in the Metaphysic of Morals, but rather in a superimposed, modern yet monistic view of punishment. Historical considerations tend to show that Kant was discussing not one, (...)
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  16. Henry Calderwood (ed.) (1886). Metaphysics of Ethics, Translated by J. W. Semple. T. & T. Clark.
  17. Michael Cholbi (2000). Kant and the Irrationality of Suicide. History of Philosophy Quarterly 17 (2):159-176.
    Though Kant calls the prohibition against suicide the first duty of human beings to themselves, his arguments for this duty lack his characteristic rigor and systematicity. The lack of a single authoritative Kantian approach to suicide casts doubt on what is generally regarded as an extreme and implausible position, to wit, that not only is suicide wrong in every circumstance, but is among the gravest moral wrongs. Here I try to remedy this lack of systematicity in order to show that (...)
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  18. J. F. Crawford (1925). Kant's Doctrine Concerning Perpetual Peace. The Monist 35 (2):296-314.
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  19. Lara Denis (ed.) (2010). Kant's Metaphysics of Morals: A Critical Guide. Cambridge University Press.
    Explores the themes of Kant's final major work of practical philosophy, providing new insight into his moral and political theory.
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  20. Lara Denis (2003). Kant's Criticism of Atheism. Kant-Studien 94 (2):198-219.
    Although Kant argues that morality is prior to and independent of religion, Kant nevertheless claims that religion of a certain sort (“moral theism”) follows from morality, and that atheism poses threats to morality. Kant criticizes atheism as morally problematic in four ways: atheism robs the atheist of springs for moral action, leads the atheist to moral despair, corrupts the atheist’s moral character, and has a pernicious influence on the atheist’s community. I argue that Kant is right to say that moral (...)
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  21. Michel Despland (1973). Kant on History and Religion. Montreal,Mcgill-Queen's University Press.
  22. Alan Donagan (1985). The Structure of Kant's Metaphysics of Morals. Topoi 4 (1):61-72.
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  23. Jeffrey Edwards (2000). Self-Love, Anthropology, and Universal Benevolence in Kant's Metaphysics of Morals. Review of Metaphysics 53 (4):887 - 914.
  24. Elisabeth H. Ellis (2007). Immanuel Kant, Toward Perpetual Peace and Other Writings on Politics, Peace, and History:Toward Perpetual Peace and Other Writings on Politics, Peace, and History. Ethics 117 (4):765-769.
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  25. Robert Fine (2003). Kant’s Theory of Cosmopolitanism and Hegel’s Critique. Philosophy and Social Criticism 29 (6):609-630.
    s theory of cosmopolitan right is widely viewed as the philosophical origin of modern cosmopolitan thought. Hegel’s critique of Kant’s theory of cosmopolitan right, by contrast, is usually viewed as regressive and nationalistic in relation to both Kant and the cosmopolitan tradition. This paper reassesses the political and philosophical character of Hegel’s critique of Kant, Hegel’s own relation to cosmopolitan thinking, and more fleetingly some of the implications of his critique for contemporary social criticism. It is argued that Hegel’s critique (...)
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  26. Katrin Flikschuh (2007). Duty, Nature, Right: Kant's Response to Mendelssohn in Theory and Practice III. Journal of Moral Philosophy 4 (2):223-241.
    This paper offers an imminent interpretation of Kant's political teleology in the context of his response to Moses Mendelssohn in Theory and Practice III concerning prospects of humankind's moral progress. The paper assesses the nature of Kant's response against his mature political philosophy in the Doctrine of Right . In `Theory and Practice III' Kant's response to Mendelssohn remains incomplete: whilst insisting that individuals have a duty to contribute towards humankind's moral progress, Kant has no conclusive answer as to how (...)
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  27. Paul Formosa (2008). “All Politics Must Bend its Knee Before Right”: Kant on the Relation of Morals to Politics. Social Theory and Practice 34 (2):157-181.
    Kant argues that morals should not only constrain politics, but that morals and politics properly understood cannot conflict. Such an uncompromising stance on the relation of morals to politics has been branded unrealistic and even politically irresponsible. While justice can afford to be blind, politics must keep its eyes wide open. In response to this charge I argue that Kant’s position on the relation of morals to politics is both morally uncompromising and yet politically flexible, both principled and practical. Kantian (...)
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  28. Paul Foulkes (1989). Review: Schwarz, Principles of Lawful Politics: Immanuel Kant's Philosophic Draft 'Toward Eternal Peace'. [REVIEW] Philosophy 64 (249):423-.
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  29. Joseph S. Freedman (1979). Kant on History and Religion. Journal of the History of Philosophy 17 (1):104-105.
  30. Roe Fremstedal (2011). The Concept of the Highest Good in Kierkegaard and Kant. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 69 (3):155-171.
    This article tries to make sense of the concept of the highest good (eternal bliss) in Søren Kierkegaard by comparing it to the analysis of the highest good found in Immanuel Kant. The comparison with Kant’s more systematic analysis helps us clarify the meaning and importance of the concept in Kierkegaard as well as to shed new light on the conceptual relation between Kant and Kierkegaard. The article argues that the concept of the highest good is of systematic importance in (...)
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  31. R. Z. Friedman (1986). Hypocrisy and the Highest Good: Hegel on Kant's Transition From Morality to Religion. Journal of the History of Philosophy 24 (4):503-522.
  32. Georg Geismann (2000). Sittlichkeit, Religion und Geschichte in der Philosophie Kants. Jahrbuch für Recht Und Ethik 8:437-531.
  33. Georg Geismann, World Peace: Rational Idea and Reality On the Principles of Kant's Political Philosophy.
    Kant's various teachings concerning (world) peace are characterized by a philosophically unique realism. Thereby, they are fundamentally distinguished from all preceding doctrines about peace. This thesis of realism refers to various aspects, respectively levels, of the doctrine, namely: 1) in general to the assumptions of the doctrine of Right3 altogether (ch. II); 2) in particular to the assumptions of the doctrine of eternal peace (chs. III-V); 3) to the recommendations with regard to the realization of eternal peace (chs. VI-XI); 4) (...)
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  34. Ana Marta González (2009). Kant's Contributions to Social Theory. Kant-Studien 100 (1):77-105.
    Although Kant is not usually counted among the forerunners of social sciences, any look at the work of the most prominent social theorists of the past century shows the pervasive influence of Kant's philosophy. This influence is obvious and crucial at the epistemological level, if only because Kant himself set the frame for subsequent discussion of the difference between human and natural sciences. Yet, Kant's work is also rich in substantive contributions to social theory, which may be articulated around his (...)
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  35. Michael K. Green (1983). Kant, Crimes Against Nature, and Contraception. New Scholasticism 57 (4):501-516.
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  36. Mary J. Gregor (1960). Kant's Conception of a "Metaphysic of Morals". Philosophical Quarterly 10 (40):238-251.
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  37. R. F. Alfred Hoernlé (1936). An Ambiguity in the Text of Kant's "Fundamental Principles of the Metaphysic of Morals". Mind 45 (177):127-128.
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  38. R. F. Alfred Hoernle (1936). An Ambiguity in the Text of Kant's "Fundamental Principles of the Metaphysic of Morals". Mind 45 (177):127 - 128.
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  39. Otfried Höffe (2010). Kant's Innate Right as a Rational Criterion for Human Rights. In Lara Denis (ed.), Kant's Metaphysics of Morals: A Critical Guide. Cambridge University Press.
  40. J. Hruschka (2004). The Permissive Law of Practical Reason in Kant's Metaphysics of Morals. Law and Philosophy 23 (1):45-72.
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  41. Matthew Johnson (2009). Church and State Relations in Kant's Political Philosophy. In Barend Christoffel Labuschagne & Ari Marcelo Solon (eds.), Religion and State - From Separation to Cooperation?: Legal-Philosophical Reflections for a de-Secularized World (Ivr Cracow Special Workshop). Nomos.
  42. Samuel Kahn (2014). Can Positive Duties Be Derived From Kant's Formula of Universal Law? Kantian Review 19 (1):93-108.
    According to the standard reading of Kant's formula of universal law (FUL), positive duties can be derived from FUL. In this article, I argue that the standard reading does not work. In the first section, I articulate FUL and what I mean by a positive duty. In the second section, I set out an intuitive version of the standard reading of FUL and argue that it does not work. In the third section, I set out a more rigorous version of (...)
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  43. Patrick Kain (2010). Duties Regarding Animals. In Lara Denis (ed.), Kant's Metaphysics of Morals: A Critical Guide. Cambridge University Press. 210--233.
    A better appreciation of Kant’s commitments in a variety of disciplines reveals Kant had a deeper understanding of human and non-human animals than generally recognized, and this sheds new light on Kant’s claims about the nature and scope of moral status and helps to address, at least from Kant’s perspective, many of the familiar objections to his notorious account of “duties regarding animals.” Kant’s core principles about the nature of moral obligation structure his thoughts about the moral status of human (...)
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  44. Patrick Kain (2005). Interpreting Kant's Theory of Divine Commands. Kantian Review 9 (1):128-149.
    Several interpretive disagreements about Kant's theory of divine commands (esp. in the work of Allen Wood and John E. Hare) can be resolved with further attention to Kant's works. It is argued that Kant's moral theism included (at least until 1797) the claim that practical reason, reflecting upon the absolute authority of the moral law, should lead finite rational beings like us to believe that there exists an omnipotent, omniscient and holy being who commands our obedience to the moral law (...)
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  45. Patrick Kain (2003). Prudential Reason in Kant's Anthropology. In Brian Jacobs & Patrick Kain (eds.), Essays on Kant's Anthropology. Cambridge University Press. 230--265.
    Within the theory of rational agency found in Kant's anthropology lectures and sketched in the moral philosophy, prudence is the manifestation of a distinctive, nonmoral rational capacity concerned with one's own happiness or well-being. Contrary to influential claims that prudential reasons are mere prima facie or "candidate" reasons, prudence can be seen to be a genuine manifestation of rational agency, involving a distinctive sort of normative authority, an authority distinguishable from and conceptually prior to that of moral norms, though still (...)
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  46. Immanuel Kant (1983). Perpetual Peace, and Other Essays on Politics, History, and Morals. Hackett Pub. Co..
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  47. Immanuel Kant (1979/1992). The Conflict of the Faculties =. University of Nebraska Press.
    It is in the interest of the totalitarian state that subjects not think for themselves, much less confer about their thinking. Writing under the hostile watch of the Prussian censorship, Immanuel Kant dared to argue the need for open argument, in the university if nowhere else. In this heroic criticism of repression, first published in 1798, he anticipated the crises that endanger the free expression of ideas in the name of national policy. Composed of three sections written at different times, (...)
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  48. Immanuel Kant (1964). The Metaphysical Principles of Morals. Indianapolis, Bobbs-Merrill Co..
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  49. Immanuel Kant (1963). On History. Indianapolis, Bobbs-Merrill.
    What is enlightenment?--Idea for a universal history from a cosmopolitan point of view.--Reviews of Herder's Ideas for a philosophy of the history and mankind.--Conjectural beginning of human history.--The end of all things.--Perpetual peace.--An old question raised again: Is the human race constantly progressing?
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  50. Immanuel Kant (1926). Prize Essay on Natural Theology and Morals.
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