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  1. Paul Abela (2002). Kant's Empirical Realism. Oxford University Press.
    Paul Abela presents a powerful, experience-sensitive form of realism about the relation between mind and world, based on an innovative interpretation of Kant. Abela breaks with tradition in taking seriously Kant's claim that his Transcendental Idealism yields a form of empirical realism, and giving a realist analysis of major themes of the Critique of Pure Reason. Abela's blending of Kantian scholarship with contemporary epistemology offers a new way of resolving philosophical debates about realism.
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  2. Erich Adickes (1894). Bibliography of Writings by and on Kant Which Have Appeared in Germany Up to the End of 1887. (VIII.). Philosophical Review 3 (4):434-458.
  3. Theodor W. Adorno (2002). Kant's Critique of Pure Reason. Polity..
    "This volume . . . provides wonderful insight into Adorno's understanding of Kant and also allows us to see more clearly the role Kant's thought played in ...
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  4. Theodor W. Adorno (2001). Kants Critique of Pure Reason, 1959. Polity.
  5. Henry E. Allison (2008). "Whatever Begins to Exist Must Have a Cause of Existence": Hume's Analysis and Kant's Response. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 76 (3):525–546.
  6. Henry E. Allison (2004). Kant's Transcendental Idealism. Yale University Press.
  7. Henry E. Allison (1996). Review of Kant's Compatibilism. [REVIEW] Philosophical Review 105 (1).
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  8. Henry E. Allison (1993). Kant on Freedom: A Reply to My Critics. Inquiry 36 (4):443 – 464.
    The first two sections of this paper are devoted respectively to the criticisms of my views raised by Stephen Engstrom and Andrews Reath at a symposium on Kant's Theory of Freedom held in Washington D.C. on 28 December 1992 under the auspices of the North American Kant Society. The third section contains my response to the remarks of Marcia Baron at a second symposium in Chicago on 24 April 1993 at the APA Western Division meetings. The fourth section deals with (...)
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  9. Henry E. Allison (1990). Kant's Theory of Freedom. Cambridge University Press.
    In his new book the eminent Kant scholar Henry Allison provides an innovative and comprehensive interpretation of Kant's concept of freedom. The author analyzes the concept and discusses the role it plays in Kant's moral philosophy and psychology. He also considers in full detail the critical literature on the subject from Kant's own time to the present day. In the first part Professor Allison argues that at the center of the Critique of Pure Reason there is the foundation for a (...)
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  10. Henry E. Allison (1973). Kant's Critique of Berkeley. Journal of the History of Philosophy 11 (1).
  11. Karl Ameriks (2003). Interpreting Kant's Critiques. Oxford University Press.
    Karl Ameriks here collects his most important essays to provide a uniquely detailed and up-to-date analysis of Kant's main arguments in all three major areas of his work: theoretical philosophy (Critique of Pure Reason), practical philosophy (Critique of Practical Reason), and aesthetics (Critique of Judgment). Guiding the volume is Ameriks's belief that one cannot properly understand any one of these Critiques except in the context of the other two. The essays can be read individually, but read together they offer a (...)
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  12. Karl Ameriks (1983). Kant on Pure Reason. Teaching Philosophy 6 (1):67-69.
  13. Karl Ameriks (1982). Recent Work on Kant's Theoretical Philosophy. American Philosophical Quarterly 19 (1):1 - 24.
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  14. Daniel E. Anderson (1979). A Note on the Syntheticity of Mathematical Propositions in Kant'sprolegomena. Southern Journal of Philosophy 17 (2):149-153.
  15. R. Lanier Anderson (2010). The Introduction to the Critique: Framing the Question. In Paul Guyer (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Kant's Critique of Pure Reason. Cambridge University Press.
  16. Ignacio Angelelli (1972). On the Origins of Kant's 'Transcendental'. Kant-Studien 63 (1-4):117-122.
  17. Kent Baldner (1990). Is Transcendental Idealism Coherent? Synthese 85 (1):1 - 23.
    I argue that transcendental idealism can be understood as a coherent and plausible account of experience. I begin by proposing an interpretation of the claim that we know only appearances that does not imply that the objects of experience are anything other than independently real objects. As I understand it, the claim here is abouthow objects appear to us, and not aboutwhat objects appear to us. After this, I offer a version of a correspondence account of veridical experience, in virtue (...)
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  18. Peter Baumanns (1988). Kants vierte Antinomie und das Ideal der reinen Vernunft. Kant-Studien 79 (1-4):183-200.
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  19. Oswald Bayer (1992). Kants Geschichte der reinen Vernunft in einer Parodie. Hamanns Metakritik im zweiten Entwurf. Kant-Studien 83 (1):1-20.
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  20. Lewis White Beck (1969/1999). Early German Philosophy: Kant and His Predecessors. St. Augustine's Press.
  21. Jeffrey Bernstein (1997). Imagination and Lunacy in Kant's First Critique and Anthropology. Idealistic Studies 27 (3):143-154.
  22. Alessandro Bertinetto (2009). «Wäre ihm dies klar geworden, so wäre seine Ktk. W.L. geworden«: Fichte's Auseinandersetzung mit Kant in den Vorlesungen ueber Transzendentale Logik. Fichte-Studien 33:145-164.
  23. Gisbert Beyerhaus (1921). Kants ‚Programm' der Aufklärung: aus dem Jahre 1784. Kant-Studien 26 (1-2):1-16.
  24. Henny Blomme (2009). La preuve de l'espace absolu et l'argument des homologues non congruents en 1768. In Luc Langlois (ed.), Les années 1747-1781 : Kant avant la Critique de la raison pure. Vrin. 169-176.
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  25. Daniel Breazeale (2003). Two Cheers for Post-Kantianism: A Response to Karl Ameriks. Inquiry 46 (2):239 – 259.
    Karl Ameriks has recently devoted an entire volume to defending what he calls "orthodox" Kantianism against what he judges to be the "errors" of such post-Kantian idealists as K. L. Reinhold and J. G. Fichte and to exposing what he claims is the frequently unnoticed but always deleterious influence of post-Kantianism upon certain prominent strands of contemporary philosophy. In response, this paper challenges Ameriks' interpretation of Kantianism itself and of the "post-Kantian project", as well as his construal of transcendental idealism. (...)
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  26. Angela Breitenbach (2008). Two Views on Nature: A Solution to Kant's Antinomy of Mechanism and Teleology. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 16 (2):351 – 369.
  27. Curtis Brown (1988). Internal Realism: Transcendental Idealism? Midwest Studies in Philosophy 12 (1):145-155.
    Idealism is an ontological view, a view about what sorts of things there are in the universe. Idealism holds that what there is depends on our own mental structure and activity. Berkeley of course held that everything was mental; Kant held the more complex view that there was an important distinction between the mental and the physical, but that the structure of the empirical world depended on the activities of minds. Despite radical differences, idealists like Berkeley and Kant share what (...)
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  28. Karl Bühler (1928). Die symbolik der sprache. Kant-Studien 33 (1-2):405-409.
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  29. Jeremy Byrd (2008). Kant's Compatibilism in the New Eludication of the First Principles of Metaphysical Cognition. Kant-Studien 99 (1):68-79.
    It is generally assumed that, during his early pre-critical phase, Kant accepted a Leibnizian account of freedom according to which we are free to do otherwise than we do even though our actions are determined. This assumption is false. Far from endorsing such an account, Kant explicitly argues in the "New Elucidation of the First Principle of Metaphysical Cognition" (1755) that there is no relevant sense in which we can do otherwise than we do. Nevertheless, he is equally convinced that (...)
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  30. John J. Callanan (2008). Kant on Analogy. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 16 (4):747 – 772.
    The role of analogy appears in surprisingly different areas of the first Critique. On the one hand, Kant considered the concept to have a specific enough meaning to entitle the principle concerned with causation an analogy; on the other hand we can find Kant referring to analogy in various parts of the Transcendental Dialectic in a seemingly different manner. Whereas in the Transcendental Analytic, Kant takes some time to provide a detailed (if not clear) account of the meaning of the (...)
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  31. Emily Carson (2006). Review of Beatrice Longuenesse, Kant on the Human Standpoint. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2006 (9).
  32. Andrew Chignell (2014). Kant and the 'Monstrous' Ground of Possibility. Kantian Review 19 (1):53-69.
    I reply to recent criticisms by Uygar Abaci and Peter Yong, among others, of my reading of Kant's pre-Critical of God's existence, and of its fate in the Critical period. Along the way I discuss some implications of this debate for our understanding of Kant's modal metaphysics and modal epistemology generally.
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  33. Andrew Chignell (2007). Kant's Concepts of Justification. Noûs 41 (1):33–63.
    An essay on Kant's theory of justification, where by “justification” is meant the evaluative concept that specifies conditions under which a propositional attitude is rationally acceptable with a moderate-to-high degree of confidence. Kant employs both epistemic and non-epistemic concepts of justification: an epistemic concept of justification sets out conditions under which a propositional attitude is rationally acceptable with a moderate-to-high degree of confidence and a candidate (if true and Gettier-immune) for knowledge. A non-epistemic concept of justification, by contrast, sets out (...)
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  34. Alix A. Cohen (2009). Kant's Concept of Freedom and the Human Sciences. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 39 (1):pp. 113-135.
  35. Phillip Cummins (1968). Kant on Outer and Inner Intuition. Noûs 2 (3):271-292.
  36. Ulrich Diehl (2013). Kants ursprüngliche Einsicht. Universitätsverlag Halle-Wittenberg.
    Die Wende von der vorkritischen zur kritischen Phase von Kants intellektueller Entwicklung ist ein wichtiges Thema der biographischen und hermeneutischen Kantforschung. Umfangreiche Abhandlungen und Essays wurden schon zu diesem Thema verfasst. Ist es überhaupt möglich, noch etwas Neues zu diesem Thema bei zutragen? Wie lässt sich das Verständnis von Kants Umbruchphase und der Genese seiner kritischen Philosophie erweitern und vertiefen? Im dem Aufsatz wird der Behauptung des Kantbiographen Manfred Kühn nachgegangen, derzufolge „keine der bislang vorgelegten Darstellungen [...] völlig zutreffend“ sei. (...)
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  37. Corey W. Dyck (2011). A Wolff in Kant's Clothing: Christian Wolff's Influence on Kant's Accounts of Consciousness, Self-Consciousness, and Psychology. Philosophy Compass 6 (1):44-53.
    In attempts to come to grips with Kant’s thought, the influence of the philosophy of Christian Wolff (1679-1754) is often neglected. In this paper, I consider three topics in Kant’s philosophy of mind, broadly construed, where Wolff’s influence is particularly visible: consciousness, self-consciousness, and psychology. I argue that we can better understand Kant’s particular arguments and positions within this context, but also gain a more accurate sense of which aspects of Kant’s accounts derive from the antecedent traditions and which constitute (...)
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  38. Corey W. Dyck (2009). The Divorce of Reason and Experience: Kant's Paralogisms of Pure Reason in Context. Journal of the History of Philosophy 47 (2):pp. 249-275.
    I consider Kant's criticism of rational psychology in the Paralogisms of Pure Reason in light of his German predecessors. I first present Wolff's foundational account of metaphysical psychology with the result that Wolff's rational psychology is not comfortably characterized as a naïvely rationalist psychology. I then turn to the reception of Wolff's account among later German metaphysicians, and show that the same claim of a dependence of rational upon empirical psychology is found in the publications and lectures of Kant's pre-Critical (...)
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  39. J. Freudiger (1991). The Problem of Perceptual Judgment in Kant's Theoretical Philosophy. Kant-Studien 82 (4):414-435.
  40. Michael Friedman (2006). Kant, Skepticism, and Idealism. Inquiry 49 (1):26 – 43.
    Skeptical problems arising for Kant's version of transcendental idealism have been raised from Kant's own time to the present day. By focussing on how such problems originally arose in the wake of Kant's work, and on the first formulations of absolute idealism by Schelling, I argue that the skeptical problems in question ultimately depend on fundamental features of Kant's philosophy of natural science. As a result, Naturphilosophie and the organic conception of nature cannot easily be separated from the deep and (...)
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  41. R. Z. Friedman (1986). Kant and Kierkegaard: The Limits of Reason and the Cunning of Faith. [REVIEW] International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 19 (1/2):3 - 22.
  42. Ido Geiger (2003). Is the Assumption of a Systematic Whole of Empirical Concepts a Necessary Condition of Knowledge? Kant-Studien 94 (3):273-298.
  43. Sarah L. Gibbons (1994). Kant's Theory of Imagination: Bridging Gaps in Judgement and Experience. Oxford University Press.
    This book departs from much of the scholarship on Kant by demonstrating the centrality of imagination to Kant's philosophy as a whole. In Kant's works, human experience is simultaneously passive and active, thought and sensed, free and unfree: these dualisms are often thought of as unfortunate byproducts of his system. Gibbons, however, shows that imagination performs a vital function in "bridging gaps" between the different elements of cognition and experience. Thus, the role imagination plays in Kant's works expresses his fundamental (...)
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  44. M. Glouberman (1988). Transcendental Idealism. Idealistic Studies 18 (3):247-265.
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  45. Mark Glouberman (2007). The Whole Story Either Kant is Not a Critical Philosopher or “Critical” Does Not Mean What Kant Says It Does. Kant-Studien 98 (1):1-39.
  46. Paul Guyer (2009). Kant, Science, and Human Nature. Philosophical Books 50 (1):15-28.
  47. Paul Guyer (2006). Kant. Routledge.
    Immanuel Kant (1724-1804) is arguably the most influential of the Enlightenment Philosophers. In this outstanding introduction, Paul Guyer introduces and assesses all the major aspects of Kant's thought. Beginning with a helpful overview of Kant's life and times, Guyer introduces the "Copernican revolution" Kant brought about in metaphysics and epistemology, carefully introducing his arguments about the nature of experience, space and time in his most influential but difficult work, The Critique of Pure Reason. He gives a much-needed explanation of Kant's (...)
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  48. Paul Guyer (2003). Beauty, Systematicity, and the Highest Good: Eckart Förster's Kant's Final Synthesis. Inquiry 46 (2):195 – 214.
    Contrary to Eckart Förster, I argue that the Opus postumum represents more of an evolution than a revolution in Kant's thought. Among other points, I argue that Kant's Selbstsetzungslehre, or theory of self-positing, according to which we cannot have knowledge of the spatio-temporal world except through recognition of the changes we initiate in it by our own bodies, does not constitute a radicalization of Kant's transcendental idealism, but is a development of the realist line of argument introduced by the "Refutation (...)
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  49. Bryan Hall (2007). Kant, Science and Human Nature. Review of Metaphysics 61 (2):424-425.
  50. Bryan Hall (2006). A Reconstruction of Kant's Ether Deduction in Übergang 11. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 14 (4):719 – 746.
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