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  1. Bridget Anderson (2008). Migrants and Work-Related Rights. Ethics and International Affairs 22 (2):199–203.
    Carens's discussion of the work-related rights of irregular migrants fails to consider the differentiated employment rights of legal temporary migrants, permanent residents, and citizens.
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  2. Adam D. Bailey (2011). Confucianism-Based Rights Skepticism and Rights in the Workplace. Business Ethics Quarterly 21 (4):661-672.
    Must even Confucian rights skeptics—those who are, on account of their Confucian beliefs, skeptical of the existence of human rights, and believe that asserting or recognizing rights is morally wrong—concede that in the workplace, they are morally obligated to recognize rights? Alan Strudler has recently argued that such is the case. In this article, I argue that because Confucian rights skeptics locate wrongness in inconsistency with the idea of “Confucian community,” Confucian community should be viewed as a moral ideal. I (...)
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  3. Adam D. Bailey & Alan Strudler (2011). Dialogue - The Confucian Critique of Rights-Based Business Ethics. Business Ethics Quarterly 21 (4):661-677.
    Confucianism-Based Rights Skepticism and Rights in the Workplace by Adam D. Bailey - Must even Confucian rights skeptics—those who are, on account of their Confucian beliefs, skeptical of the existence of human rights, and believe that asserting or recognizing rights is morally wrong—concede that in the workplace, they are morally obligated to recognize rights? Alan Strudler has recently argued that such is the case. In this article, I argue that because Confucian rights skeptics locate wrongness in inconsistency with the idea (...)
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  4. Adam D. Bailey & Alan Strudler (2011). Dialogue - The Confucian Critique of Rights-Based Business Ethics. Business Ethics Quarterly 21 (4):661-677.
    Confucianism-Based Rights Skepticism and Rights in the Workplace by Adam D. Bailey - Must even Confucian rights skeptics—those who are, on account of their Confucian beliefs, skeptical of the existence of human rights, and believe that asserting or recognizing rights is morally wrong—concede that in the workplace, they are morally obligated to recognize rights? Alan Strudler has recently argued that such is the case. In this article, I argue that because Confucian rights skeptics locate wrongness in inconsistency with the idea (...)
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  5. Bénédicte Brahic & Susie Jacobs (2013). Empowering Women: A Labor Rights-Based Approach: Case Studies From East African Horticultural Farms. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 26 (3):601-619.
    This article discusses the hitherto little-studied question of women workers’ empowerment through access to labor rights in the east African export horticultural sector. It is based on the work carried out by Women Working Worldwide and its east African partners, drawing on primary research on cut-flower farms in Ethiopia, Tanzania, and Uganda. The focus in discussions of women’s empowerment has tended to be on individual actors rather than collective strategies. We argue that strategies such as action research, education, organization and (...)
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  6. Kristin E. Buzun (1998). US Multinationals and Workers' Rights Globally. Business Ethics 7 (1):53–58.
    History shows that legislation can make firms respect their workers’ rights and refrain from victimising them. Given the scale of disregard for workers’ rights around the globe and the absence of a global legislature, should the US step in to protect workforces globally, at least so far as concerns American multinationals? The author is completing her MBA at London Business School and has an American background in accountancy and banking.
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  7. Steve Daskal (2010). Libertarianism Left and Right, the Lockean Proviso, and the Reformed Welfare State. Social Theory and Practice 36 (1):21-43.
    This paper explores the implications of libertarianism for welfare policy. There are two central arguments. First, the paper argues that if one adopts a libertarian framework, it makes most sense to be a Lockean right-libertarian. Second, the paper argues that this form of libertarianism leads to the endorsement of a fairly extensive set of redistributive welfare programs. Specifically, the paper argues that Lockean right-libertarians are committed to endorsing welfare programs under which the receipt of benefits is conditional on meeting a (...)
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  8. Pablo Gilabert (2016). Labor Human Rights and Human Dignity. Philosophy and Social Criticism 42 (2):171-199.
    The current legal and political practice of human rights invokes entitlements to freely chosen work, to decent working conditions, and to form and join labor unions. Despite the importance of these rights, they remain under-explored in the philosophical literature on human rights. This article offers a systematic and constructive discussion of them. First, it surveys the content and current relevance of the labor rights stated in the most important documents of the human rights practice. Second, it gives a moral defense (...)
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  9. Carol Ann Johnson (1995). Review of Peter Beilharz, Transforming Labor: Labour Tradition and the Labor Decade in Australia. [REVIEW] Political Theory 7 (1):102-104.
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  10. Govind Persad (2015). On H. M. Oliver’s “Established Expectations and American Economic Policies”. Ethics 125 (3):829-832,.
    In this retrospective for Ethics, I discuss H.M. Oliver’s “Established Expectations and American Economic Policies.” This article, by a then-modestly-famous economist, has been ignored (no citations) since its 1940 publication. Yet it bears directly on a normative problem at the intersection of ethics and economics that challenges today’s policymakers but has received comparatively little philosophical attention: how should we balance potentially desirable institutional change against the disruption of established expectations? -/- Oliver details how the principle of fulfilling established expectations cuts (...)
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  11. Cristian Timmermann & Georges F. Félix (2015). Agroecology as a Vehicle for Contributive Justice. Agriculture and Human Values 32 (3):523-538.
    Agroecology has been criticized for being more labor-intensive than other more industrialized forms of agriculture. We challenge the assertion that labor input in agriculture has to be generally minimized and argue that besides quantity of work one should also consider the quality of work involved in farming. Early assessments on work quality condemned the deskilling of the rural workforce, whereas later criticisms have concentrated around issues related to fair trade and food sovereignty. We bring into the discussion the concept of (...)
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