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  1. Hans Aarsleff (1979). The Study of Language in England, 1780-1860. Greenwood Press.
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  2. H. B. Acton (1960). The Philosophy of Language in Revolutionary France. London.
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  3. Luvell Anderson, Sally Haslanger & Rae Langton (2012). Language and Race. In Gillian Russell & Delia Graff Fara (eds.), The Routledge Companion to Philosophy of Language. Routledge.
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  4. David Bogen (1991). Linguistic Forms and Social Obligations: A Critique of the Doctrine of Literal Expression in Searle. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 21 (1):31–62.
  5. Finn Bostad (ed.) (2004). Bakhtinian Perspectives on Language and Culture: Meaning in Language, Art, and New Media. Palgrave Macmillan.
    In this multi-disciplinary volume, comprising the work of several established scholars from different countries, central concepts associated with the work of the Bakhtin Circle are interrogated in relation to intellectual history, language theory and an understanding of new media. The book will prove an important resource for those interested in the ideas of the Bakhtin Circle, but also for those attempting to develop a coherent theoretical approach to language in use and problems of meaning production in new media.
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  6. David Braddon-Mitchell & Caroline West (2004). What is Free Speech? Journal of Political Philosophy 12 (4):437-460.
    It is widely held that free speech is a distinctive and privileged social kind. But what is free speech? In particular, is there any unified phenomenon that is both free speech and which is worthy of the special value traditionally attached to free speech? We argue that a descendent of the classic Millian justification of free speech is in fact a justification of a more general social condition; and, via an argument that 'free speech' names whatever natural social kind is (...)
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  7. David Braybrooke (2003). Toward an Alliance Between the Issue-Processing Approach and Pragma-Dialectical Analysis. Argumentation 17 (4):513-535.
    On the approach to discussions of policy choices that treats such discussions as instances of issue-processing, the joint use of the logic of questions and the logic of rules gives precise formulation to two sorts of issues. To one sort of issue belong issue-circumscribing questions; to another sort, issues-simplicter, which consist of disjunctions of policy proposals – so many proposed social rules – that are answers, in the case of each disjunction, to a given issue-circumscribing question. Work in pragma-dialectics can (...)
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  8. Robert Briscoe (2004). Single-Mindedness: Language, Thought, and the First Person. Dissertation, Boston University
  9. Sylvia Burrow (2008). Gendered Politeness, Self-Respect, and Autonomy. In Bernard Mulo Farenkia (ed.), In De la Politesse Linguistique au Cameroun / Linguistic Politeness in Cameroon. Peter Lang.
    Socialization enforces gendered standards of politeness that encourage men to be dominating and women to be deferential in mixed-gender discourse. This gendered dynamic of politeness places women in a double bind. If women are to participate in polite discourse with men, and thus to avail of smooth and fortuitous social interaction, women demote themselves to a lower social ranking. If women wish to rise above such ranking, then they fail to be polite and hence, open themselves to a wellspring of (...)
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  10. Stephen J. Cowley (2012). Mimesis and Language: A Distributed View. Interaction Studies 13 (1):17-40.
    To unzip language from social behaviour one can hypothesise that language-systems are constituted by words and rules or, alternatively, constructions. The systems thus become autonomous and, if linked to individualist psychology, one can posit that each person’s brain operates a language faculty However, such views find little support in neuroscience. Brains self-organize by linking phonetic (and manual) gestures with action-perception. Far from being housed in the skull,language activity links people across time-scales. Not only does articulation give rise to speech but,together (...)
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  11. Marcel Danesi (2009). Opposition Theory and the Interconnectedness of Language, Culture, and Cognition. Sign Systems Studies 37 (1-2):11-41.
    The theory of opposition has always been viewed as the founding principle of structuralism within contemporary linguistics and semiotics. As an analytical technique, it has remained a staple within these disciplines, where it continues to be used as a means for identifying meaningful cues in the physical form ofsigns. However, as a theory of conceptual structure it was largely abandoned under the weight of post-structuralism starting in the 1960s — the exception tothis counter trend being the work of the Tartu (...)
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  12. Robb Edward Eason (2005). The Whole Truth and Nothing but the Truth. [REVIEW] Human Studies 28 (1):95 - 100.
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  13. Anna Filipi (2013). Withholding and Pursuit in the Development of Skills in Interaction and Language. Interaction Studies 14 (2):139-159.
    Withholding and pursuit are well-documented phenomena in talk between adults and in talk with children. They have been described as working to perform various functions that emerge locally between speakers in a variety of interactional contexts both in ordinary conversation and in institutional talk.In this paper I explore further the actions of pursuit and withholding in interaction between parents and their very young children, first described in Filipi (2003, 2009) by going beyond description and by examining how these features might (...)
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  14. Thomas Fossen (2012). Politicizing Brandom's Pragmatism: Normativity and the Agonal Character of Social Practice. European Journal of Philosophy 20 (4):371-395.
    This paper provides an agonistic interpretation of Robert Brandom's social-pragmatic account of normativity. I argue that social practice, on this approach, should be seen not just as cooperative, but also as contestatory. This aspect, which has so far remained implicit, helps to illuminate Brandom's claim that normative statuses are ‘instituted’ by social practices: normative statuses are brought into play in mutual engagement, and are only in play from an engaged social perspective among others. Moreover, in contrast to a positivist or (...)
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  15. Paul Friedrich (1964). The Cross-Cultural Study of Semantic Structure. [Philadelphia?].
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  16. Christopher Gauker (2003). Social Externalism and Linguistic Communication. In Maria J. Frapolli & E. Romero (eds.), Meaning, Basic Self-Knowledge, and Mind: Essays on Tyler Burge. CSLI.
    According to the expressive theory of communication, the primary function of language is to enable speakers to convey the content of their thoughts to hearers. According to Tyler Burge's social externalism, the content of a person's thought is relative to the way words are used in his or her surrounding linguistic community. This paper argues that Burge's social externalism refutes the expressive theory of communication.
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  17. Christopher Gauker (1992). The Lockean Theory of Communication. Noûs 26 (3):303-324.
    The Lockean theory of communication is here defined as the theory that communication takes place when a hearer grasps some sort of mental object, distinct from the speaker's words, that the speaker's words express. This theory contrasts with the view that spoken languages are the very medium of a kind of thought of which overt speech is the most basic form. This article is a critique of some of the most common motives for adopting a Lockean theory of communication. It (...)
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  18. Heimir Geirsson (2012). Philosophy of Language and Webs of Information. Routledge.
    Introduction and overview -- Reference -- Propositions: structure and objects -- Reporting attitudes -- Singular propositions and acquaintance -- Beliefs and belief reports -- Empty names -- Attitude contexts: beliefs and justification.
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  19. Joachim Gessinger (1985). Language and the Formation of Society in Germany. Topoi 4 (2):215-222.
    This article provides an account of the language standardization process in Germany during the 18th century. Linguistic activity as a means of social definition and differentiation is discussed with respect to class relations within the absolutist states in Germany. The linguistic awareness of different social classes expressed in the debates on linguistic standards of language unification supports the assumption of an asymmetric modernization process which is based not only on conditions such as literacy, education and economical subsistence but at the (...)
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  20. Raymond Gibbs Jr (2002). Marcelo Dascal and the Literal Meaning Debates. Manuscrito 25 (2).
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  21. Jennifer Greenwood & Ann Bonner (2008). The Role of Theory-Constitutive Metaphor in Nursing Science. Nursing Philosophy 9 (3):154-168.
    Abstract The current view of theoretical statements in science is that they should be literal and precise; ambiguous and metaphorical statements are useful only as pre-theoretical, exegetical, and heuristic devices and as pedagogical tools. In this paper we argue that this view is mistaken. Literal, precise statements apply to those experiential phenomena which can be defined either conventionally by criterial attribution or by internal atomic constitution. Experiential phenomena which are defined relationally and/or functionally, like nursing, in virtue of their nature, (...)
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  22. Eran Guter (2011). A Surrogate for the Soul: Wittgenstein and Schoenberg. In Enzo De Pellegrin (ed.), Interactive Wittgenstein. Springer. 109--152.
    This article challenges a widespread assumption, arguing that Wittgenstein and the Austrian composer Arnold Schoenberg had little in common beyond their shared cultural heritage, overlapping social circles in fin-de-ciecle Vienna. The article explores Wittgenstein's aesthetic inclinations and the intellectual and philosophical influences that may have reinforced them. The article culminates in an attempt to form a Wittgensteinian response to Schoenberg's dodecaphonic language and to answer the question as to why Wittgenstein and Schoenberg arrived at very different ideas about contemporary music (...)
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  23. Peter Harder (2003). The Status of Linguistic Facts: Rethinking the Relation Between Cognition, Social Institution and Utterance From a Functional Point of View. Mind and Language 18 (1):52–76.
  24. Howard Harris (2001). Content Analysis of Secondary Data: A Study of Courage in Managerial Decision Making. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 34 (3-4):191 - 208.
    Empirical studies in business ethics often rely on self-reported data, but this reliance is open to criticism. Responses to questionnaires and interviews may be influenced by the subject''s view of what the researcher might want to hear, by a reluctance to talk about sensitive ethical issues, and by imperfect recall. This paper reviews the extent to which published research in business ethics relies on interviews and questionnaires, and then explores the possibilities of using secondary data, such as company documents and (...)
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  25. Martin Heidegger (2010). Zum Wesen der Sprache Und Zur Frage Nach der Kunst. Klostermann.
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  26. David Herman (2007). Ethnolinguistic Identity and Social Cognition. Sign Systems Studies 35 (1-2):217-228.
    Analysts studying the nexus between language and ethnic identity have characterized ethnolinguistic ideologies as the deep structure of overt language practices. By contrast, this exploratory analysis argues for the advantages of shifting from a multi-level to a single-level explanatory model, consisting of interpretive frames and data (= aspects of sociocommunicative behavior) interpreted by way of those frames. The single-level model affords, arguably, a more unified treatment of people’s everyday inferences about ethnolinguistic identity, on the one hand, and research paradigms for (...)
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  27. John Hospers (1946/1964). Meaning and Truth in the Arts. Hamden, Conn.,Archon Books.
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  28. Anne S. Hsu, Nick Chater & Paul Vitányi (2013). Language Learning From Positive Evidence, Reconsidered: A Simplicity-Based Approach. Topics in Cognitive Science 5 (1):35-55.
    Children learn their native language by exposure to their linguistic and communicative environment, but apparently without requiring that their mistakes be corrected. Such learning from “positive evidence” has been viewed as raising “logical” problems for language acquisition. In particular, without correction, how is the child to recover from conjecturing an over-general grammar, which will be consistent with any sentence that the child hears? There have been many proposals concerning how this “logical problem” can be dissolved. In this study, we review (...)
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  29. Kirsten Hyldgaard (2006). The Discourse of Education—the Discourse of the Slave. Educational Philosophy and Theory 38 (2):145–158.
  30. Gerhard Jäger (2013). Rationalizable Signaling. Erkenntnis:1-34.
    An important finding of the game theoretic research on signaling games is the insight that under many circumstances, a signal obtains credibility by incurring costs to the sender. Therefore it seems questionable whether or not cheap talk—signals that are not payoff relevant—can serve to transmit information among rational agents. This issue is non-trivial in strategic interactions where the preferences of the players are not aligned. Researchers like Crawford & Sobel, Rabin, and Farrell demonstrated, however, that even in the case of (...)
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  31. Christine A. James (2011). Communication in Online Fan Communities: The Ethics of Intimate Strangers. Empedocles 2 (2):279-289.
    Dan O’Brien gives an excellent analysis of testimonial knowledge transmission in his article ‘Communication Between Friends’ (2009) noting that the reliability of the speaker is a concern in both externalist and internalist theories of knowledge. O’Brien focuses on the belief states of Hearers (H) in cases where the reliability of the Speaker (S) is known via ‘intimate trust’, a special case pertaining to friendships with a track record of reliable or unreliable reports. This article considers the notion of ‘intimate trust’, (...)
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  32. Mehmet Karabela (2013). The Dialectical Discourse in Classical Ottoman Literature: The Beloved Between Lover and Rival in the Game of Love. Journal of Turkish Literature 10 (1):7-19.
  33. June F. Kikuchi (2008). Polemics, Taste, and Truth in Nursing Discourse. Nursing Philosophy 9 (4):273-276.
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  34. Guido Küng (1965). Soviet Philosophy and the Semantic Definition of Truth. Studies in East European Thought 5 (1-2):51-56.
  35. Eerik Lagerspetz (1998). On Language Rights. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 1 (2):181-199.
    In social and political philosophy, linguistic differences are usually seen as one item in the long and indefinite list of Cultural Differences; consequently, language rights are discussed and criticized together with other cultural rights. In this essay, it is argued that a right to use one's own language can be justified by appeal to the practical role of language in human life. The ability to communicate effectively is essential for human autonomy and well-being; thus there is no need to argue (...)
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  36. Lawrence Lengbeyer (2004). Rhetoric and Anti-Semitism. Academic Questions 17 (2):22-32.
    Given that charges of anti-Semitism, racism, and the like continue to be potent weapons of moral and intellectual critique in our culture, it is important that we work toward a clear understanding about just what sorts of conduct and circumstances constitute these moral offenses. In particular, can criticism of a state (such as Israel), or other social or political institution or organization (such as the NAACP), ever amount to anti-Semitism, racism, or other bigotry against the people represented by or associated (...)
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  37. Jasper Liptow (2004). Regel Und Interpretation: Eine Untersuchung Zur Sozialen Struktur Sprachlicher Praxis. Velbrück Wissenschaft.
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  38. Sébastien Magnier & Shahid Rahman, Leibniz's Notion of Conditional Right and the Dynamics of Public Announcement.
    The main aim of our paper is to implement Leibniz's analysis of the conditional right in the framework of a dialogical approach to Public Announcement Logic. According to our view, on one hand: PAL furnishes a dynamic epistemic operator which models communication exchange between different agents that seems to be very close to Leibniz understanding of the dynamics between the truth of a proposition and the knowledge of the truth of that proposition (Leibniz calls the latter certification of its truth); (...)
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  39. J. Hillis Miller (2013). Literature Matters Today. Substance 42 (2):12-32.
    "Matters"! This is an odd word when used as a verb. Of course we know what it means. The verbal form of "matter" means "count for something," "have import," "have effects in the real world," "be worth taking seriously." Using the word as a noun, however, someone might speak of "literature matters," meaning the whole realm that involves literature. The Newsletter of the Maine Chapter of the Appalachian Mountain Club is called Wilderness Matters, punning on the word as a noun (...)
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  40. Cheryl Misak (2008). A Culture of Justification: The Pragmatist's Epistemic Argument for Democracy. Episteme 5 (1):pp. 94-105.
    The pragmatist view of politics is at its very heart epistemic, for it treats morals and politics as a kind of deliberation or inquiry, not terribly unlike other kinds of inquiry. With the exception of Richard Rorty, the pragmatists argue that morals and politics, like science, aim at the truth or at getting things right and that the best method for achieving this aim is a method they sometimes call the scientific method or the method of intelligence – what would (...)
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  41. Sara Mitri, Julien Hubert & Markus Waibel (2008). Social Behavior: From Cooperation to Language. Biological Theory 3 (2):99-102.
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  42. Peter Mott (1995). Towards a Winograd/Flores Semantics. Minds and Machines 5 (1):69-87.
    A basic theme of Winograd and Flores (1986) is that the principal function of language is to co-ordinate social activity. It is, they claim, from this function that meaning itself arises. They criticise approaches that try to understand meaning through the mechanisms of reference, the Rationalist Tradition as they call it. To seek to ground meaning in social practice is not new, but the approach is presently attractive because of difficulties encountered with the notion of reference. Without taking a view (...)
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  43. Gregory Nixon (2006). Mortal Knowledge, the Originary Event, and the Emergence of the Sacred. Anthropoetics 12 (1):24.
  44. Susana Nuccetelli (2004). Reference and Ethnic-Group Terms. Inquiry 47 (6):528 – 544.
    The increasingly pluralistic character of modern societies has led to questions, not only about the proper use of ethnic-group terms, but also about the correct semantic analysis of them. Here I argue that ethnic-group terms are analogous to other linguistic expressions whose extension is fixed in the way suggested by a causal theory of reference. My view accommodates precisely those scenarios of communication involving ethnic-group terms that will be seen puzzling to Fregeans. At the same time, it undermines the plausibility (...)
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  45. Susana Nuccetelli (2001). 'Latinos', 'Hispanics', and 'Iberoamericans': Naming or Describing? Philosophical Forum 32 (2):175–188.
    In some ways that have been largely ignored, ethnic-group names might be similar to names of other kinds. If they are, for instance, analogous to proper names, then a correct semantic account of the latter could throw some light on how the meaning of ethnic-group names should be construed. Of course, proper names, together with definite descriptions, belong to the class of singular terms, and an influential view on the semantics of such terms was developed, at the turn of the (...)
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  46. Susana Nuccetelli & Stewart Rod (2009). Ethnic-Group Terms. In S. Nuccetelli (ed.), Blackwell Companion to Latin American Philosophy. Blackwell.
  47. Élisabeth Pacherie (1996). Pensée, langage et communauté Michel Seymour Collection «Analytiques», vol. 7 Montréal, Bellarmin; Paris, Vrin, 1994, 342 p. [REVIEW] Dialogue 35 (03):641-.
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  48. Trevor Pateman (1975). Language, Truth and Politics. J. Stroud and T. Pateman.
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  49. Adolf Portmann & Rudolf Ritsema (eds.) (1973). Man and Speech =. Brill.
    ERNST BENZ DIE SCHÖPFERISCHE BEDEUTUNG DES WORTES BEI JACOB BOEHME I Wenn der diesjährige Eranos sich als Thema : „Mensch und Wort" gestellt hat, ...
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  50. Stephen Prince (1989). Politics and the Linguistic Sign: Vološinov's Philosophy of Language. Critical Review 3 (3-4):568-578.
    MARXISM AND THE PHILOSOPHY, OF LANGUAGE By V.N. Volo?inov translated by Ladislav Matejka & I.R. Titunik Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 1986. 205 pp., $9.95 (paper) The contributions of Volo?inov's theories of language are assessed and are contrasted to traditional Marxist philosophy, Saussurean linguistics and more recent developments in transformational grammar and sociolinguistics. Studying connections between language and politics in the 1920s, Volosinov explored the ways social reality enters verbal signs and their usage, anticipating many (...)
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