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  1. Hans Aarsleff (1979). The Study of Language in England, 1780-1860. Greenwood Press.
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  2. H. B. Acton (1960). The Philosophy of Language in Revolutionary France. London.
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  3. Hubert Alexander (1956). Language in Culture. Review of Metaphysics 10 (2):282 - 288.
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  4. Luvell Anderson, Sally Haslanger & Rae Langton (2012). Language and Race. In Gillian Russell & Delia Graff Fara (eds.), The Routledge Companion to Philosophy of Language. Routledge
  5. Simone Aurora (2012). Deleuze, Guattari e le macchine semiotiche. Janus. Quaderni Del Circolo Glossematico 10:141-157.
  6. David Bogen (1991). Linguistic Forms and Social Obligations: A Critique of the Doctrine of Literal Expression in Searle. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 21 (1):31–62.
  7. Finn Bostad (ed.) (2004). Bakhtinian Perspectives on Language and Culture: Meaning in Language, Art, and New Media. Palgrave Macmillan.
    In this multi-disciplinary volume, comprising the work of several established scholars from different countries, central concepts associated with the work of the Bakhtin Circle are interrogated in relation to intellectual history, language theory and an understanding of new media. The book will prove an important resource for those interested in the ideas of the Bakhtin Circle, but also for those attempting to develop a coherent theoretical approach to language in use and problems of meaning production in new media.
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  8. David Braddon-Mitchell & Caroline West (2004). What is Free Speech? Journal of Political Philosophy 12 (4):437-460.
    It is widely held that free speech is a distinctive and privileged social kind. But what is free speech? In particular, is there any unified phenomenon that is both free speech and which is worthy of the special value traditionally attached to free speech? We argue that a descendent of the classic Millian justification of free speech is in fact a justification of a more general social condition; and, via an argument that 'free speech' names whatever natural social kind is (...)
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  9. David Braybrooke (2003). Toward an Alliance Between the Issue-Processing Approach and Pragma-Dialectical Analysis. Argumentation 17 (4):513-535.
    On the approach to discussions of policy choices that treats such discussions as instances of issue-processing, the joint use of the logic of questions and the logic of rules gives precise formulation to two sorts of issues. To one sort of issue belong issue-circumscribing questions; to another sort, issues-simplicter, which consist of disjunctions of policy proposals – so many proposed social rules – that are answers, in the case of each disjunction, to a given issue-circumscribing question. Work in pragma-dialectics can (...)
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  10. Robert Briscoe (2004). Single-Mindedness: Language, Thought, and the First Person. Dissertation, Boston University
    Philosophy has always taken the asymmetry between self and other as one of its major themes. In this thesis, I examine the relation between an individual's knowledge of language from a first-person perspective, on the one hand, and characterization of her as a member of a linguistic community from a third-person perspective, on other. Focusing on Crispin Wright, I try in Chapter One to show that semantic antirealism cannot stably be combined with either communitarianism or constructivism about meaning. I also (...)
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  11. Sylvia Burrow (2008). Gendered Politeness, Self-Respect, and Autonomy. In Bernard Mulo Farenkia (ed.), In De la Politesse Linguistique au Cameroun / Linguistic Politeness in Cameroon. Peter Lang
    Socialization enforces gendered standards of politeness that encourage men to be dominating and women to be deferential in mixed-gender discourse. This gendered dynamic of politeness places women in a double bind. If women are to participate in polite discourse with men, and thus to avail of smooth and fortuitous social interaction, women demote themselves to a lower social ranking. If women wish to rise above such ranking, then they fail to be polite and hence, open themselves to a wellspring of (...)
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  12. Marc Champagne (forthcoming). Brandom, Peirce, and the Overlooked Friction of Contrapiction. Synthese:1-16.
    Robert Brandom holds that what we mean is best understood in terms of what inferences we are prepared to defend, and that such a defence is best understood in terms of rule-governed social interactions. This manages to explain quite a lot. However, for those who think that there is more to making correct/incorrect inferences than obeying/breaking accepted rules, Brandom’s account fails to adequately capture what it means to reason properly. Thus, in an effort to sketch an alternative that does not (...)
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  13. Stephen J. Cowley (2012). Mimesis and Language: A Distributed View. Interaction Studies 13 (1):17-40.
    To unzip language from social behaviour one can hypothesise that language-systems are constituted by words and rules or, alternatively, constructions. The systems thus become autonomous and, if linked to individualist psychology, one can posit that each person’s brain operates a language faculty However, such views find little support in neuroscience. Brains self-organize by linking phonetic (and manual) gestures with action-perception. Far from being housed in the skull,language activity links people across time-scales. Not only does articulation give rise to speech but,together (...)
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  14. Adam M. Croom (2015). The Importance of Poetry, Hip-Hop, and Philosophy for an Enlisted Aviator in the USAF (2000-2004) Flying in Support of Operation Enduring Freedom and Operation Iraqi Freedom. Journal of Poetry Therapy 28:1-25.
    This special issue of Journal of Poetry Therapy focuses on the use of poetry and other forms of expressive writing to explore the transformative experiences of military veterans, and so in this article I discuss how the use of poetry, hip-hop, and philosophy positively influenced my life while I was serving in the United States Air Force (USAF) from 2000 through 2004. This article briefly reviews my reasons for enlisting and discusses the importance that poetry, hip-hop, and philosophy had for (...)
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  15. Adam M. Croom (2014). Remarks on The Semantics of Racial Slurs. Linguistic and Philosophical Investigations 13:11-32.
    In “The Semantics of Racial Slurs,” an article recently published in Linguistic and Philosophical Investigations, Hedger draws upon Kaplan’s distinction between descriptive and expressive content to argue that slurs are expressions with purely expressive content. Here I review the key considerations presented by Hedger in support of his purely expressive account of slurs and provide clear reasons for why it must ultimately be rejected. After reviewing the key cases Hedger offers for consideration in support of his view that slurs are (...)
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  16. Adam M. Croom (2013). How to Do Things with Slurs: Studies in the Way of Derogatory Words. Language and Communication 33:177-204.
    This article provides an original account of slurs and how they may be differentially used by in-group and out-group speakers. Slurs are first distinguished from other terms and their role in social interaction is discussed. A new distinction is introduced between three different uses of slurs : the paradigmatic derogatory use, non-paradigmatic derogatory use, and non-paradigmatic non-derogatory use. I then account for their literal meaning and explain how a family-resemblance conception of category membership can clarify our understanding of the various (...)
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  17. Marcel Danesi (2009). Opposition Theory and the Interconnectedness of Language, Culture, and Cognition. Sign Systems Studies 37 (1-2):11-41.
    The theory of opposition has always been viewed as the founding principle of structuralism within contemporary linguistics and semiotics. As an analytical technique, it has remained a staple within these disciplines, where it continues to be used as a means for identifying meaningful cues in the physical form ofsigns. However, as a theory of conceptual structure it was largely abandoned under the weight of post-structuralism starting in the 1960s — the exception tothis counter trend being the work of the Tartu (...)
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  18. Alex Davies (2014). How to Silence Content with Porn, Context and Loaded Questions. European Journal of Philosophy 24 (1).
    Catharine MacKinnon claimed that pornography silence's women's speech where this speech is protected by free speech legislation. MacKinnon's claim was attacked as confused because, so it seemed, pornography is not the kind of thing that can silence speech. Using ideas drawn from John Austin's account of speech acts, Rae Langton defended MacKinnon's claim against this attack by showing how speech can, in principle, be silenced by pornography. However, Langton's defence requires us to deviate from a widely held understanding of what (...)
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  19. Andreas Dorschel (1997). Bilder und Worte. Weimarer Beiträge: Zeitschrift Für Literaturwissenschaft, Ästhetik Und Kulturwissenschaften 43 (1):110-122.
    ‘Logos’ is the Greek term for word, and language is indeed the realm of logic in a way that imagery never will be. While clearly not all use of words is argumentative – in fact, most is not –, their sequentiality brings them closer to argument than images, given the simultaneity of contents within the latter. In images, there is no discrete number of definite signs – the sort of thing language has in its vocabulary. The relations between colour and (...)
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  20. Robb Edward Eason (2005). The Whole Truth and Nothing but the Truth. [REVIEW] Human Studies 28 (1):95 - 100.
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  21. Anna Filipi (2013). Withholding and Pursuit in the Development of Skills in Interaction and Language. Interaction Studies 14 (2):139-159.
    Withholding and pursuit are well-documented phenomena in talk between adults and in talk with children. They have been described as working to perform various functions that emerge locally between speakers in a variety of interactional contexts both in ordinary conversation and in institutional talk.In this paper I explore further the actions of pursuit and withholding in interaction between parents and their very young children, first described in Filipi (2003, 2009) by going beyond description and by examining how these features might (...)
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  22. Thomas Fossen (2012). Politicizing Brandom's Pragmatism: Normativity and the Agonal Character of Social Practice. European Journal of Philosophy 20 (4):371-395.
    This paper provides an agonistic interpretation of Robert Brandom's social-pragmatic account of normativity. I argue that social practice, on this approach, should be seen not just as cooperative, but also as contestatory. This aspect, which has so far remained implicit, helps to illuminate Brandom's claim that normative statuses are ‘instituted’ by social practices: normative statuses are brought into play in mutual engagement, and are only in play from an engaged social perspective among others. Moreover, in contrast to a positivist or (...)
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  23. Paul Friedrich (1964). The Cross-Cultural Study of Semantic Structure. [Philadelphia?].
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  24. Gabriel Furmuzachi (2007). Language, Identity and Multiculturalism. Logos.
    With Augustine and especially with Wittgenstein, we see that when we use language we negotiate a meaning since language is something we acquire in a community. On the other hand, Chomsky argues that language is something that happens to us, rather than something we learn. We attempt to bring these two positions in a balance by following Davidson's ideas on meaning and radical interpretation, which gives us a way to keep meaning (what someone thinks) and belief (what someone holds true (...)
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  25. Gabriel Furmuzachi (2003). On Words and Things. Vox Philosophiae 1.
    In this essay, I will critically examine Collin Turbayne and Philip Wheelwright's approaches to the theory of metaphor. Through criticism of their views I will arrive at Paul Ricoeur's theory which I consider is the most comprehensive one. Ricoeur retains what is fruitful from the above mentioned theories and tries to make them part of a very ambitious project which is represented by his monumental work The Rule of Metaphor (1977). He manages to open a new dimension in the analysis (...)
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  26. Furmuzachi Gabriel, Another Other: The Foreigner.
  27. Oscar W. Gabriel (1994). Politische Einstellungen und politische Kultur-zur Klärung. In Stephen Everson (ed.), Language. Cambridge University Press
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  28. Oscar W. Gabriel (1994). Politische Kultur aus der Sicht der empirischen. In Stephen Everson (ed.), Language. Cambridge University Press
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  29. Oscar W. Gabriel (1994). Wertewandel, neue politische Bewegungen und kommunale. In Stephen Everson (ed.), Language. Cambridge University Press
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  30. Christopher Gauker (2003). Social Externalism and Linguistic Communication. In Maria J. Frapolli & E. Romero (eds.), Meaning, Basic Self-Knowledge, and Mind: Essays on Tyler Burge. CSLI
    According to the expressive theory of communication, the primary function of language is to enable speakers to convey the content of their thoughts to hearers. According to Tyler Burge's social externalism, the content of a person's thought is relative to the way words are used in his or her surrounding linguistic community. This paper argues that Burge's social externalism refutes the expressive theory of communication.
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  31. Christopher Gauker (1992). The Lockean Theory of Communication. Noûs 26 (3):303-324.
    The Lockean theory of communication is here defined as the theory that communication takes place when a hearer grasps some sort of mental object, distinct from the speaker's words, that the speaker's words express. This theory contrasts with the view that spoken languages are the very medium of a kind of thought of which overt speech is the most basic form. This article is a critique of some of the most common motives for adopting a Lockean theory of communication. It (...)
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  32. Heimir Geirsson (2012). Philosophy of Language and Webs of Information. Routledge.
    Introduction and overview -- Reference -- Propositions: structure and objects -- Reporting attitudes -- Singular propositions and acquaintance -- Beliefs and belief reports -- Empty names -- Attitude contexts: beliefs and justification.
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  33. Joachim Gessinger (1985). Language and the Formation of Society in Germany. Topoi 4 (2):215-222.
    This article provides an account of the language standardization process in Germany during the 18th century. Linguistic activity as a means of social definition and differentiation is discussed with respect to class relations within the absolutist states in Germany. The linguistic awareness of different social classes expressed in the debates on linguistic standards of language unification supports the assumption of an asymmetric modernization process which is based not only on conditions such as literacy, education and economical subsistence but at the (...)
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  34. Raymond Gibbs Jr (2002). Marcelo Dascal and the Literal Meaning Debates. Manuscrito 25 (2):199-224.
    What role does literal meaning play in people’s understanding of indirect and figurative language? Scholars from many disciplines have debated this issue for several decades. This chapter describes these debates, especially focusing on the arguments between the author and Marcelo Dascal. I suggest that Dascal’s defense of “moderate literalism” may have some validity, contrary to some of my earlier arguments against this point of view. The chapter acknowledges the strong contribution that Marcelo Dascal has made to interdisciplinary discussions on language (...)
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  35. Jennifer Greenwood & Ann Bonner (2008). The Role of Theory-Constitutive Metaphor in Nursing Science. Nursing Philosophy 9 (3):154-168.
    Abstract The current view of theoretical statements in science is that they should be literal and precise; ambiguous and metaphorical statements are useful only as pre-theoretical, exegetical, and heuristic devices and as pedagogical tools. In this paper we argue that this view is mistaken. Literal, precise statements apply to those experiential phenomena which can be defined either conventionally by criterial attribution or by internal atomic constitution. Experiential phenomena which are defined relationally and/or functionally, like nursing, in virtue of their nature, (...)
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  36. Eran Guter (2011). A Surrogate for the Soul: Wittgenstein and Schoenberg. In Enzo De Pellegrin (ed.), Interactive Wittgenstein. Springer 109--152.
    This article challenges a widespread assumption, arguing that Wittgenstein and the Austrian composer Arnold Schoenberg had little in common beyond their shared cultural heritage, overlapping social circles in fin-de-ciecle Vienna. The article explores Wittgenstein's aesthetic inclinations and the intellectual and philosophical influences that may have reinforced them. The article culminates in an attempt to form a Wittgensteinian response to Schoenberg's dodecaphonic language and to answer the question as to why Wittgenstein and Schoenberg arrived at very different ideas about contemporary music (...)
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  37. Peter Harder (2003). The Status of Linguistic Facts: Rethinking the Relation Between Cognition, Social Institution and Utterance From a Functional Point of View. Mind and Language 18 (1):52–76.
  38. Howard Harris (2001). Content Analysis of Secondary Data: A Study of Courage in Managerial Decision Making. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 34 (3-4):191 - 208.
    Empirical studies in business ethics often rely on self-reported data, but this reliance is open to criticism. Responses to questionnaires and interviews may be influenced by the subject's view of what the researcher might want to hear, by a reluctance to talk about sensitive ethical issues, and by imperfect recall. This paper reviews the extent to which published research in business ethics relies on interviews and questionnaires, and then explores the possibilities of using secondary data, such as company documents and (...)
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  39. Martin Heidegger (2010). Zum Wesen der Sprache Und Zur Frage Nach der Kunst. Klostermann.
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  40. David Herman (2007). Ethnolinguistic Identity and Social Cognition. Sign Systems Studies 35 (1-2):217-228.
    Analysts studying the nexus between language and ethnic identity have characterized ethnolinguistic ideologies as the deep structure of overt language practices. By contrast, this exploratory analysis argues for the advantages of shifting from a multi-level to a single-level explanatory model, consisting of interpretive frames and data (= aspects of sociocommunicative behavior) interpreted by way of those frames. The single-level model affords, arguably, a more unified treatment of people’s everyday inferences about ethnolinguistic identity, on the one hand, and research paradigms for (...)
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  41. Adam Hodges & Chad Nilep (eds.) (2007). Discourse, War and Terrorism. John Benjamins.
    Discourse since September 11, 2001 has constrained and shaped public discussion and debate surrounding terrorism worldwide. Social actors in the Americas, Europe, Asia, the Middle East and elsewhere employ the language of the "war on terror" to explain, react to, justify and understand a broad range of political, economic, and social phenomena. Discourse, War and Terrorism explores the discursive production of identities, the shaping of ideologies, and the formation of collective understandings in response to 9/11 in the United States and (...)
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  42. Harry Hoijer & Franklin Fearing (1954). Language in Culture Conference on the Interrelations of Language and Other Aspects of Culture. University of Chicago Press.
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  43. John Hospers (1946). Meaning and Truth in the Arts. Hamden, Conn.,Archon Books.
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  44. Anne S. Hsu, Nick Chater & Paul Vitányi (2013). Language Learning From Positive Evidence, Reconsidered: A Simplicity-Based Approach. Topics in Cognitive Science 5 (1):35-55.
    Children learn their native language by exposure to their linguistic and communicative environment, but apparently without requiring that their mistakes be corrected. Such learning from “positive evidence” has been viewed as raising “logical” problems for language acquisition. In particular, without correction, how is the child to recover from conjecturing an over-general grammar, which will be consistent with any sentence that the child hears? There have been many proposals concerning how this “logical problem” can be dissolved. In this study, we review (...)
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  45. Kirsten Hyldgaard (2006). The Discourse of Education—the Discourse of the Slave. Educational Philosophy and Theory 38 (2):145–158.
    The current cult of the personality of the teacher and personal development as an official goal in education policy documents are problematic as they make it difficult to distinguish a teacher from a seducer, thus blurring the distinction between education and therapy. In order to describe the pedagogical bond proper the article draws on Lacanian psychoanalytic concepts such as identification, suggestion, and transference. Lacan's distinction between the discourse of the university and the discourse of the master is presented in order (...)
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  46. Gerhard Jäger (2013). Rationalizable Signaling. Erkenntnis 79 (S4):1-34.
    An important finding of the game theoretic research on signaling games is the insight that under many circumstances, a signal obtains credibility by incurring costs to the sender. Therefore it seems questionable whether or not cheap talk—signals that are not payoff relevant—can serve to transmit information among rational agents. This issue is non-trivial in strategic interactions where the preferences of the players are not aligned. Researchers like Crawford & Sobel, Rabin, and Farrell demonstrated, however, that even in the case of (...)
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  47. Christine A. James (2011). Communication in Online Fan Communities: The Ethics of Intimate Strangers. Empedocles: European Journal for the Philosophy of Communication 2 (2):279-289.
    Dan O’Brien gives an excellent analysis of testimonial knowledge transmission in his article ‘Communication Between Friends’ (2009) noting that the reliability of the speaker is a concern in both externalist and internalist theories of knowledge. O’Brien focuses on the belief states of Hearers (H) in cases where the reliability of the Speaker (S) is known via ‘intimate trust’, a special case pertaining to friendships with a track record of reliable or unreliable reports. This article considers the notion of ‘intimate trust’, (...)
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  48. Lascelles G. B. James, New Testament Oral Tradition: Problems in the Transcription.
    For the NT writer, transcription was the process of recording the Christological/theological events of their time to papyrus or vellum. The effort here is to help the reader to understand that from the spoken word to papyrus/vellum was not dictation or a simple copy process but rather a very arduous procedure that was subject to practices of oral expression and limited by the orthography of the target or writing language. Writers were not simply copying but they were re-interpreting oral traditions (...)
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  49. Lascelles G. B. James James, Hellenism and Antisemitism in the New Testament.
    The New Testament Writings and the Septuagint were possibly compiled in Hellenism’s greatest period of influence. It is reasonable to say that the writings were influenced by Hellenism because they were written in the language of Hellenism. This study examines how the hegemony of Hellenism, the worldviews of Hellenists, and the current of anti-Semitism impacted the New Testament Writers and influenced why they wrote how they wrote.
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  50. Mehmet Karabela (2013). The Dialectical Discourse in Classical Ottoman Literature: The Beloved Between Lover and Rival in the Game of Love. Journal of Turkish Literature 10 (1):7-19.
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