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Key works Lewis 1975 Heidegger 2004 Ellis 2005 Chomsky 2000 Mercier 1994 Martin 1987
Introductions Pinker 1995
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  1. Rama Kant Agnihotri & H. K. Dewan (eds.) (2010). Knowledge, Language and Learning. Macmillan Publishers India.
    Issues in the construction of knowledge -- Language, mind and cognition -- Aspects of language -- Curricular areas.
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  2. Ben Ambridge (2013). How Do Children Restrict Their Linguistic Generalizations? An (Un‐)Grammaticality Judgment Study. Cognitive Science 37 (3):508-543.
    A paradox at the heart of language acquisition research is that, to achieve adult-like competence, children must acquire the ability to generalize verbs into non-attested structures, while avoiding utterances that are deemed ungrammatical by native speakers. For example, children must learn that, to denote the reversal of an action, un- can be added to many verbs, but not all (e.g., roll/unroll; close/*unclose). This study compared theoretical accounts of how this is done. Children aged 5–6 (N = 18), 9–10 (N = (...)
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  3. Fabrizio Arosio (2010). Infectum and Perfectum. Two Faces of Tense Selection in Romance Languages. Linguistics and Philosophy 33 (3):171-214.
    This paper investigates the semantics of tense and aspect in Romance languages. Its goal is to develop a compositional, model-theoretic semantics for tense and temporal adverbs which is sensitive to aspectual distinctions. I will consider durative adverbial distributions and aspectual contrasts across different morphological tense forms. I will examine tense selection under habitual meanings, generic meanings and state of result constructions. In order to account for these facts I will argue that temporal homogeneity plays a fundamental role in tense selection (...)
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  4. L. K. B. (1958). Language. Review of Metaphysics 11 (3):519-520.
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  5. L. K. B. (1958). Language. Review of Metaphysics 11 (3):519-520.
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  6. R. J. B. (1969). Language and Mind. Review of Metaphysics 23 (2):342-343.
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  7. R. J. B. (1965). The Structure of Language. Review of Metaphysics 19 (1):164-165.
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  8. B. E. Babich (2008). Books in Review: Speaking Against Number: Heidegger, Language, and the Politics of Calculation, by Stuart Elden. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2006. 172 Pp. $75.00 (Cloth). [REVIEW] Political Theory 36 (3):473-478.
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  9. Emmon Bach, Structure and Texture: Toward an Understanding of Real Languages.
    About: the tensions between the inner and outer view of R-languages ("real languages"), the language-centered and theory-centered study of languages, the (often foreign) linguist and the (sometimes linguist) native speaker, description and theory, a language as a set of choices and extensions of universal grammar and as a concrete realization in a particular culture and history. The materials for this paper are drawn mostly from First Nations languages, especially those of the Pacific Northwest.
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  10. Emmon Bach, Conflict and Consensus About First Nations' Languages.
    All over the world, local languages are facing possible or probable extinction. The situation is nowhere more acute than for First Nations* in the regions now called the United States of America and Canada. In the face of this situation many people have become interested in studying endangered languages. Interest in threatened languages comes from many different sides: commercial, academic, scientific, religious, and more. The most immediately affected are of course the very speakers of the languages and the communities where (...)
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  11. Emmon Bach (2002). On the Surface Verb Q'ay'ai Qela. Linguistics and Philosophy 25 (5-6):531-544.
  12. John Baker (1981). Playing the Language Game Game. Modern Schoolman 58 (3):185-193.
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  13. A. Bamgbose (1993). Deprived, Endangered, and Dying Languages. Diogenes 41 (161):19-25.
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  14. John A. Barnden (1996). Unconscious Gaps in Jackendoff 's "How Language Helps Us Think"? Pragmatics and Cognition 4 (1):65-80.
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  15. Steven Bartlett (1977). "Philosophy and Language," by Steven Davis. Modern Schoolman 54 (4):406-406.
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  16. James Beattie (1788/1974). The Theory of Language. New York,Ams Press.
  17. Sigrid Beck (2012). Pluractional Comparisons. Linguistics and Philosophy 35 (1):57-110.
    This paper develops a semantic analysis of data like It is getting colder and colder. Their meaning is argued to arise from a combination of a comparative with pluractionality. The analysis is embedded in a general theory of plural predication and pluractionality. It supports a semantic theory involving a family of syntactic plural operators.
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  18. Bergljot Behrens & Cathrine Fabricius-Hansen (2009). The Relation Accompanying Circumstance Across Languages: Conflict Between Linguistic Expression and Discourse Subordination? In Dingfang Shu & Ken Turner (eds.), Contrasting Meanings in Languages of the East and West. Peter Lang.
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  19. John Bell, Infinitary Languages.
    We begin with the following quotation from Karp [1964]: My interest in infinitary logic dates back to a February day in 1956 when I remarked to my thesis supervisor, Professor Leon Henkin, that a particularly vexing problem would be so simple if only I could write a formula which would say x = 0 or x = 1 or x = 2 etc. To my surprise, he replied, "Well, go ahead." Traditionally, expressions in formal systems have been regarded as signifying (...)
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  20. Giulio Benedetti, Giorgio Marchetti, Alexander A. Fingelkurts & Andrew A. Fingelkurts (2010). Mind Operational Semantics and Brain Operational Architectonics: A Putative Correspondence. Open Neuroimaging Journal 4:53-69.
    Despite allowing for the unprecedented visualization of brain functional activity, modern neurobio-logical techniques have not yet been able to provide satisfactory answers to important questions about the relationship between brain and mind. The aim of this paper is to show how two different but complementary approaches, Mind Operational Semantics (OS) and Brain Operational Architectonics (OA), can help bridge the gap between a specific kind of mental activity—the higher-order reflective thought or linguistic thought—and brain. The fundamental notion that allows the two (...)
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  21. Raffaella Bernardi & Anna Szabolcsi (2008). Optionality, Scope, and Licensing: An Application of Partially Ordered Categories. Journal of Logic, Language and Information 17 (3):237-283.
    This paper uses a partially ordered set of syntactic categories to accommodate optionality and licensing in natural language syntax. A complex but well-studied data set pertaining to the syntax of quantifier scope and negative polarity licensing in Hungarian is used to illustrate the proposal. The presentation is geared towards both linguists and logicians. The paper highlights that the main ideas can be implemented in different grammar formalisms, and discusses in detail an implementation where the partial ordering on categories is given (...)
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  22. Pierre Besnier (1675/1971). A Philosophical Essay for the Reunion of Languages, 1675. Menston,Scolar Press.
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  23. Derek Bickerton (2006). Language Use, Not Language, is What Develops in Childhood and Adolescence. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (3):280-281.
    That both language and novel life-history stages are unique to humans is an interesting datum. But failure to distinguish between language and language use results in an exaggeration of the language acquisition period, which in turn vitiates claims that new developmental stages were causative factors in language evolution.
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  24. John C. Bigelow (1977). Language, Mind, and Knowledge (Minnesota Studies in the Philosophy of Science, Vol. VII). Linguistics and Philosophy 1 (2):301-304.
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  25. B. J. Bimer (1994). Information Status andWordOrderallA—Nalysis of English Inversion. In Stephen Everson (ed.), Language. Cambridge University Press. 70.
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  26. Betty J. Birner (1994). Information Status and Word Order: An Analysis of English Inversion. In Stephen Everson (ed.), Language. Cambridge University Press. 233--259.
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  27. Maria Bittner, Notes on Evidentiality and Mood.
    In Kalaallisut (Eskimo-Aleut:Greenland) verbs inflect for illocutionary mood (declarative, interrogative, imperative, or optative). In addition, the language has an evidential (reportative) clitic which is compatible with all illocutionary moods and gives rise to a variety of readings. These<br>lecture notes exemplify the attested combinations and readings by means of a representative sample of mini-discourses and mini-dialogs.
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  28. Maria Bittner, Amele Switch Reference as Temporal Recentering.
    Amele (Papuan, New Guinea) is a tense-mood-based language (in the typology of Bittner 2014) with an elaborate system of clause chaining, including switch reference (SR) and serial verb constructions (SVC). This draft analyzes two interlinear Amele texts (from Roberts 2007) in Update with Centering of Bittner (2014). The basic idea is that an SR-chain is a topic-comment sequence about a 'topical development' — i.e. a topic time framing a chain of causally linked events. In contrast, an SVC is a chain (...)
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  29. Maria Bittner (1987). On the Semantics of the Greenlandic Antipassive and Related Constructions. International Journal of American Linguistics 53:194–231.
    : This study describes a new field method, suited for investigating scope relations — and other aspects of truth conditional meaning — with native speaker consultants who may speak no other language and have no background in linguistics or logic. This method revealed a surprising scope contrast between the antipassive and the ergative construction in Greenlandic Eskimo. The results of this field work are described in detail and a crosslinguistic scope generalization is proposed based on Greenlandic Eskimo, Basque, Polish, Russian, (...)
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  30. David Blank (1994). 'Analogy, Anomaly and Apollonius Dyscolus. In Stephen Everson (ed.), Language. Cambridge University Press. 149--165.
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  31. Ben Blumson (2014). Symbol Systems. In Resemblance and Representation. Open Book Publishers. 85-98.
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  32. Steffen Borge (2009). Intentions and Compositionality. SATS: Northern European Journal of Philosophy 10 (1):100-106.
    It has been argued that philosophers that base their theories of meaning on communicative intentions and language conventions cannot accommodate the fact that natural languages are compositional. In this paper I show that if we pay careful attention to Grice's notion of “resultant procedures” we see that this is not the case. The argument, if we leave out all the technicalities, is fairly simple. Resultant procedures tell you how to combine utterance parts, like words, into larger units, like sentences. You (...)
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  33. Lajos L. Brons (2014). Language Death and Diversity: Philosophical and Linguistic Implications. The Science of Mind 52:243-260.
    This paper presents a simple model to estimate the number of languages that existed throughout history, and considers philosophical and linguistic implications of the findings. The estimated number is 150,000 plus or minus 50,000.
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  34. Jon Burmeister & Mark Sentesy (eds.) (2007). On Language: Analytic, Continental and Historical Contributions. Cambridge Scholars.
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  35. Charles E. Butterworth (1989). The First and Second Discourses, Together with the Replies to Critics and Essay on the Origin of Languages. Review of Metaphysics 43 (1):181-183.
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  36. Darragh Byrne & Max Kölbel (eds.) (2010). Arguing About Language. Routledge.
    Arguing About Language presents a comprehensive selection of key readings on fundamental issues in the philosophy of language. It offers a fresh and exciting introduction to the subject, addressing both perennial problems and emerging topics. Classic readings from Frege, Russell, Kripke, Chomsky, Quine, Grice, Lewis and Davidson appear alongside more recent pieces by philosophers or linguists such as Robyn Carston, Delia Graff Fara, Frank Jackson, Ernie Lepore & Jerry Fodor, Nathan Salmon, Zoltán Szabó, Timothy Williamson and Crispin Wright. Organised into (...)
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  37. G. L. C. (1963). Universals of Language. Review of Metaphysics 17 (1):145-145.
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  38. Elisabeth Camp (2009). A Language of Baboon Thought? In Robert W. Lurz (ed.), The Philosophy of Animal Minds. Cambridge University Press. 108--127.
    Does thought precede language, or the other way around? How does having a language affect our thoughts? Who has a language, and who can think? These questions have traditionally been addressed by philosophers, especially by rationalists concerned to identify the essential difference between humans and other animals. More recently, theorists in cognitive science, evolutionary biology, and developmental psychology have been asking these questions in more empirically grounded ways. At its best, this confluence of philosophy and science promises to blend the (...)
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  39. Daniele Chiffi (2012). Idiolects and Language. Axiomathes 22 (4):417-432.
    The present paper is intended to analyse from a theoretical point of view the relationships between natural language and idiolects in the context of communication by means of the Davidson–Dummett controversy on the nature of language. I will explore from a pragmatic point of view the reliability of an alternative position inspired by the recent literalism/contextualism debate in philosophy of language in order to overcome some limitations of Dummett’s and Davidson’s perspectives on language, idiolects and communication.
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  40. Noam Chomsky (2003/1971). Problems of Knowledge and Freedom. New York,Distributed by W.W. Norton.
  41. Noam Chomsky (2002). On Nature and Language. Cambridge University Press.
    Featuring an essay by the author on the role of intellectuals in society and government, a fascinating volume sheds light on the relation between language, mind ...
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  42. Noam Chomsky (2000). New Horizons in the Study of Language and Mind. Cambridge University Press.
    This book is an outstanding contribution to the philosophical study of language and mind, by one of the most influential thinkers of our time. In a series of penetrating essays, Chomsky cuts through the confusion and prejudice which has infected the study of language and mind, bringing new solutions to traditional philosophical puzzles and fresh perspectives on issues of general interest, ranging from the mind-body problem to the unification of science. Using a range of imaginative and deceptively simple linguistic analyses, (...)
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  43. John Collins (2010). How Long Can a Sentence Be and Should Anyone Care? Croatian Journal of Philosophy 10 (3):199-207.
    It is commonly assumed that natural languages, construed as sets of sentences, contain denumerably many sentences. One argument for this claim is that the sentences of a language must be recursively enumerable by a grammar, if we are to understand how a speaker-hearer could exhibit unbounded competence in a language. The paper defends this reasoning by articulating and defending a principle that excludes the construction of a sentence non-denumerably many words long.
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  44. John Collins (2009). Naturalism in the Philosohpy of Language; or, Why There is No Such Thing as Language. In Sarah Sawyer (ed.), New Waves in Philosophy of Language. Palgrave Macmillan.
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  45. David E. Cooper (1973/1987). Philosophy and the Nature of Language. Greenwood Press.
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  46. Robin Cooper, Is English Really a Formal Language?
    • languages as sets of strings and early transformational grammar • interpreted languages as sets of string-meaning pairs • Montague in ‘Universal Grammar’: There is in my opinion no important theoretical difference between natural languages and the artificial languages of logicians; indeed I consider it possible to comprehend the syntax and semantics of both kinds of languages within a single natural and mathematically precise theory.
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  47. Miriam Corris, Christopher Manning, Susan Poetsch & Jane Simpson, Dictionaries and Endangered Languages.
    Linguists have seen creating dictionaries of endangered languages as a key activity in language maintenance and revival work. However, like any approach to language engineering, there are concerns to address. The first is the tension between language documentation and language maintenance2. The second is the role of literacy. A lot of effort has been put into vernacular literacy, on the assumption that it assists language maintenance, as well as language documentation. In some respects this is a dubious assumption, because writing (...)
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  48. Harold G. Coward (1980). The Sphota Theory of Language: A Philosophical Analysis. Motilal Banarsidass.
    According to Bhartrhari, these are the three levels of language through which ... necessarily identified with language, since these levels of language, ...
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  49. Stephen J. Cowley (2005). In the Beginning: Word or Deed? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (4):493-494.
    Emphasizing that agents gain from culture-based patterns, I consider the etiology of meaning. Since the simulations show that “shared categories” are not based in learning, I challenge Steels & Belpaeme's (S&B's) folk view of language. Instead, I stress that meaning uses indexicals to set off a replicator process. Finally, I suggest that memetic patterns – not words – are the grounding of language.
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  50. Stephen Crain & Paul M. Pietroski (2002). Why Language Acquisition is a Snap. Linguistic Review.
    Nativists inspired by Chomsky are apt to provide arguments with the following general form: languages exhibit interesting generalizations that are not suggested by casual (or even intensive) examination of what people actually say; correspondingly, adults (i.e., just about anyone above the age of four) know much more about language than they could plausibly have learned on the basis of their experience; so absent an alternative account of the relevant generalizations and speakers' (tacit) knowledge of them, one should conclude that there (...)
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