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  1. Dennis M. Ahern (1977). Ineffabilityinthe Lao Tzu: The Taming of a Dragon. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 4 (4):357-382.
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  2. Barry Allen (2010). A Dao of Technology? Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 9 (2):151-160.
    Scholars have detected hostility to technology in Daoist thought. But is this a problem with any machine or only some applications of some machines by some people? I show that the problem is not with machines per se but with the people who introduce them, or more exactly with their knowledge. It is not knowledge as such that causes the disorder Laozi and Zhuangzi associate with machines; it is confused, disordered knowledge—superficial, inadequate, unsubtle, and artless. In other words the problem (...)
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  3. Robert E. Allinson (1994). Moral Values and the Taoist Sage in the Tao de Ching. Asian Philosophy 4 (2):127 – 136.
    Abstract The theme of this paper is that while there are four seemingly contradictory classes of statements in the Tao de Ching regarding moral values and the Taoist sage, these statements can be interpreted to be consistent with each other. There are statements which seemingly state or imply that nothing at all can be said about the Tao; there are statements which seemingly state or imply that all value judgements are relative; there are statements which appear to attribute moral behaviour (...)
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  4. Freya Boedicker (2009). The Philosophy of Tai Chi Chuan: Wisdom From Confucius, Lao Tzu, and Other Great Thinkers. Blue Snake Books.
    Each chapter of this concise volume focuses on a single work or philosopher, and includes a short history of each one as well as a description of their ...
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  5. David Chai (2014). Meontological Generativity: A Daoist Reading of the Thing. Philosophy East and West 64 (2):303-318.
  6. Deron Chen (2009). Dao Legislates for Humans Vs. Humans Legislate for Themselves : A Comparison of Laozi's and Confucius' Conceptions of Dao. In Jinfen Yan & David E. Schrader (eds.), Creating a Global Dialogue on Value Inquiry: Papers From the Xxii Congress of Philosophy (Rethinking Philosophy Today). Edwin Mellen Press.
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  7. Ellen Marie Chen (1973). The Origin and Development of Being (Yu) From Non-Being (Wu) in the Tao Te Ching. International Philosophical Quarterly 13 (3):403-417.
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  8. Lai Chen (2010). The Guodian Bamboo Slips and Confucian Theories of Human Nature. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 37 (s1):33-50.
  9. Phan Chánh Công (2007). The Laozi Code. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 6 (3):239-262.
    The term “dao” (道) has been playing the theoretically paradigmatic role in almost all East Asian philosophies, religions, and cultures. The meanings of the term “dao” in the Dao De Jing and other ancient East Asian texts have remained hermeneutically problematic up to this point in time. This article argues that one of the main causes of this hermeneutical problematic is the failure to establish a theoretically formal typology of the “dao.” It further suggests that a hermeneutically disciplined reading of (...)
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  10. Steve Coutinho (2002). The Abduction of Vagueness: Interpreting The. Philosophy East and West 52 (4):409-425.
    : The role of vagueness in the Laozi is explored by investigating its connection with "process." First, a hermeneutic methodology is developed and adopted, derived from Peirce's notion of "abduction." Second, this notion is analyzed, and several distinctive characteristics, or "traces," of vagueness are identified. Third, evidence of these traces in the text of the Laozi is collected, with comments on their significance in the Daoist context.
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  11. David H. DeGrood (1971). Radical Currents in Contemporary Philosophy. St. Louis,W. H. Green.
    Critique of idealistic naturalism: methodological pollution in the main stream of American philosophy, by D. Riepe.--Ex nihilo nihil fit: philosophy's "starting point," by D. H. DeGrood.--An historical critique of empiricism, by J. E. Hansen.--Epilogue on Berkeley, by R. W. Sellars.--Mandala thinking, by A. Mackay.--An empirical conception of freedom, by E. D'Angelo.--Heidegger on the essence of truth, by M. Farber.--Minding as a material force, by H. L. Parsons.--The crisis of the 1890's and the shaping of twentieth century America, by R. B. (...)
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  12. Karyn L. Lai (2007). Ziran and Wuwei in the Daodejing : An Ethical Assessment. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 6 (4):325-337.
    In Daoist philosophy, the self is understood as an individual interdependent with others, and situated within a broader environment. Within this framework, the concept ziran is frequently understood in terms of naturalness or nature while wuwei is explained in terms of non-oppressive government. In many existing accounts, little is done to connect these two key Daoist concepts. Here, I suggest that wuwei and ziran are correlated, ethical, concepts. Together, they provide a unifying ethical framework for understanding the philosophy of the (...)
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  13. Karyn L. Lai (2003). Conceptual Foundations for Environmental Ethics: A Daoist Perspective. Environmental Ethics 25 (3):247-266.
    The concepts dao and de in the Daodejing may be evoked to support a distinctive and plausible account of environmental holism. Dao refers to the totality of particulars, including the relations that hold between them, and the respective roles and functions of each within the whole. De refers to the distinctiveness of each particular, realized meaningfully only within the context of its interdependence with others, and its situatedness within the whole. Together, dao and de provide support for an ethical holism (...)
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  14. Stephen R. Palmquist (2012). A Daoist Model for a Kantian Church. Comparative Philosophy 4 (1).
    Although significant differences undoubtedly exist between Daoism and Kant’s philosophy, the two systems also have some noteworthy similarities. After calling attention to a few such parallels and sketching the outlines of Kant’s philosophy of religion, this article focuses on an often-neglected feature of the latter: the four guiding principles of what Kant calls an “invisible church” (universality, purity, freedom, and unchangeableness). Numerous passages from Lao Z i’s classic text, Dao-De-Jing , seem to uphold these same principles, thus suggesting that they (...)
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  15. Steven Shankman (2006). The daodeJing of Laozi – Philip J. Ivanhoedao de Jing: The Book of the Way – Moss Roberts. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 33 (2):303–308.
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  16. Zhihua Yao (2010). Typology of Nothing: Heidegger, Daoism and Buddhism. Comparative Philosophy 1 (1):78-89.
    Parmenides expelled nonbeing from the realm of knowledge and forbade us to think or talk about it. But still there has been a long tradition of nay-sayings throughout the history of Western and Eastern philosophy. Are those philosophers talking about the same nonbeing or nothing? If not, how do their concepts of nothing differ from each other? Could there be different types of nothing? Surveying the traditional classifications of nothing or nonbeing in the East and West have led me to (...)
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