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  1. Chaehyun Chong (1999). The Neo-Mohist Conception of Bian (Disputation). Journal of Chinese Philosophy 26 (1):1-19.
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  2. Chris Fraser, More Mohist Marginalia: A Reply to Makeham on Later Mohist Canon and Explanation B 67.
    This note responds to an interpretation of Mohist Canon and Explanation B 671 published by John Makeham some years ago.2 Makeham’s interpretation makes significant contributions to our understanding of this passage, especially in calling attention to problems with two influential previous interpretations, those of A. C. Graham and Chad Hansen.3 Yet his reading presents difficulties of its own, which I will attempt to rectify here.
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  3. Chris Fraser, Mohist Canons. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    The Mohist Canons are a set of brief statements on a variety of philosophical and other topics by anonymous members of the Mohist school , an influential philosophical, social, and religious movement of China's Warring States period (479-221 B.C.). [1] Written and compiled most likely between the late 4th and mid 3rd century B.C., the Canons are often referred to as the “later Mohist” or “Neo-Mohist” canons, since they seem chronologically later than the bulk of the Mohist writings, most of (...)
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  4. Jane Geaney (1999). A Critique of A.C. Graham's Reconstruction of the "Neo-Mohist Canons&Quot;. Journal of the American Oriental Society 19 (1):1-11.
    A. C. Graham's Later Mohist Logic, Ethics, and Sciences (1978) is the only Western-language translation of the obscure and textually corrupt chapters of the Mozi that purportedly constitute the foundations of ancient Chinese logic. Graham's presentation and interpretation of this difficult material has been largely accepted by scholars. This article questions the soundness of Graham's reconstruction of these chapters (the so-called "Neo-Mohist Canons"). Upon close examination, problems are revealed in both the structure and the content of the framework Graham uses (...)
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  5. A. C. Graham (1978). Later Mohist Logic, Ethics, and Science. School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London.
  6. Chad Hansen (1983). Language and Logic in Ancient China. University of Michigan Press.
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  7. Christian Jochim (1980). Ethical Analysis of an Ancient Debate: Moists Versus Confucians. Journal of Religious Ethics 8 (1):135 - 147.
    Despite the importance of the Moist-Confucian debate to students of both Chinese thought and comparative religious ethics, it remains in need of a careful analysis using contemporary ethical theory. In presenting such an analysis, this essay aims to accomplish three things: (1) to show how Confucius and Mo-tzu were divided over the priority-of-the-right issue, the latter being a utilitarian in his working ethics despite his oft-noted interest in divine command theory; (2) to describe how their followers worked out a meta-ethical (...)
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  8. Ian Johnston (2004). The Gongsun Longzi: A Translation and an Analysis of its Relationship to Later Mohist Writings. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 31 (2):271–295.
  9. Ian Johnston (2000). Choosing the Greater and Choosing the Lesser: A Translation and Analysis of the Daqu and Xiaoqu Chapters of the Mozi. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 27 (4):375–407.
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  10. Karyn Lai (2008). An Introduction to Chinese Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.
    This comprehensive introductory textbook to early Chinese philosophy covers a range of philosophical traditions which arose during the Spring and Autumn (722-476 BCE) and Warring States (475-221 BCE) periods in China, including Confucianism, Mohism, Daoism, and Legalism. It considers concepts, themes and argumentative methods of early Chinese philosophy and follows the development of some ideas in subsequent periods, including the introduction of Buddhism into China. The book examines key issues and debates in early Chinese philosophy, cross-influences between its traditions and (...)
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  11. Fenrong Liu & Jialong Zhang (2010). New Perspectives on Moist Logic. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 37 (4):605-621.
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  12. Thierry Lucas (2005). Later Mohist Logic, Lei, Classes, and Sorts. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 32 (3):349–365.
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  13. Dan Robins (2011). Ian Johnston, The Mozi: A Complete Translation. [REVIEW] Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 10 (4):551-556.
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  14. Dan Robins (2011). The Later Mohists and Logic. History and Philosophy of Logic 31 (3):247-285.
    This article is a study of the Later Mohists' 'Lesser Selection (Xiaoqu)', which, more than any other early Chinese text, seems to engage in the study of logic. I focus on a procedure that the Mohists called mou . Arguments by mou are grounded in linguistic parallelism, implying perhaps that the Mohists were on the way to a formal analysis of argumentation. However, their main aim was to head off arguments by mou that targeted their own doctrines, and if their (...)
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  15. Jinmei Yuan (2012). Analogical Propositions in Moist Texts. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 39 (3):404-423.
    This article is an effort to improve understanding between Moist and Aristotelian logics on analogy. I argue that Chinese logic can neither fit in Aristotelian deductive framework, nor completely fit in Aristotelian inductive framework. One of the major reasoning skills that ancient Chinese logicians applied is analogical reasoning. Having examined thirteen Moist analogical propositions in a Moist text, the Da Qu 〈大取〉from the perspective of finding rationales (li 理) among things, I conclude that if the rationales can be found in (...)
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  16. Jinmei Yuan (2006). The Role of Time in the Structure of Chinese Logic. Philosophy East and West 56 (1):136-152.
    Ancient Chinese logicians presupposed no fixed order in the world. Things are changing all the time. Time, then, plays a crucial role in the structure of Chinese logic. This article uses the concept of "subjective time" and the Leibnizian concept of "possible worlds" to analyze the structure of logic in the Later Mohist Canon and in the logical reasoning of other early Chinese philosophers. The author argues that Chinese logic is structured in the time of the now. This time is (...)
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  17. Desheng Zong (2000). Studies of Intensional Contexts in Mohist Writings. Philosophy East and West 50 (2):208-228.
    The Mohist School's logical study focuses mainly on the following inference rule: suppose that N and M are coextensive terms, or N a subset of M; it follows that if a verb can appear in front of N, it can also appear in front of M. That is, if 'VM' then 'VN', where V is some extensional verb. Such an approach to logical inference necessitates the study of logical relations among nouns, verbs, and the relations between these two types of (...)
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