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  1. R. A. (1979). Lawyers' Ethics in an Adversary System. Review of Metaphysics 32 (3):542-543.
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  2. Richard L. Abel (2012). Comparative Studies of Lawyer Deviance and Discipline. Legal Ethics 15 (2):187-195.
    Comparative case studies of lawyer deviance and discipline offer a unique perspective on how and why lawyers misbehave, how regulatory bodies respond, and the efficacy of those responses. Such studies also provide valuable pedagogic tools, opening the eyes of law students to the ways in which they, too, could transgress ethical rules. This special issue builds on my two books on misbehaving lawyers in New York and California by presenting vivid accounts of such lawyers in the UK, Canada, Australia, New (...)
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  3. Richard L. Abel (2008). Lawyers in the Dock: Learning From Attorney Disciplinary Procedings. Oup Usa.
    For more than a decade, American lawyers have bewailed the ethical crisis in their profession, wringing their hands about its bad image. But their response has been limited to spending money on public relations, mandating education, and endlessly revising ethical rules. In this book, Richard Abel will argue that these measures will do little or nothing to solve the problems illustrated by the six disciplinary case studies featured in this book unless the legal monopoly enjoyed by attorneys in the U.S. (...)
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  4. Ann Abraham (1998). Legal Ethics and the Legal Services Ombudsman. Legal Ethics 1 (1):23-24.
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  5. Annalise Acorn (2011). Understanding Lawyers' Ethics in Canada. Legal Ethics 14 (1):169-171.
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  6. Annalise Acorn & Jason Buttuls (2013). The Not Now Habit: Procrastination, Legal Ethics and Legal Education. Legal Ethics 16 (1):73-96.
    In this paper we examine the relationship between diligence and ethics and the connection between procrastination and ethical misconduct for lawyers. From there we ask the question of whether legal education does enough to teach law students good habits of time management that might minimize the kind of procrastination that so often goes hand in hand with lawyer malfeasance. Far from concluding that legal education addresses these issues adequately we advance the claim that legal education actually teaches procrastination. Drawing on (...)
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  7. Jess Alderman (2007). Ethical Implications of Physician Involvement in Lawsuits on Behalf of the Tobacco Industry. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 35 (4):692-698.
    The statements of physicians who serve as expert witnesses for the tobacco industry reveal subtle but significant problems. Some expert testimony obfuscates the important issues, and some initially reasonable statements later evolve into extreme positions during cross-examination. Such statements fall into a “gray area” of professional ethics, potentially misleading juries and adversely affecting professional integrity. Medical associations can and should strongly enforce professional standards that do not tolerate tobacco industry influence on physician expert witnesses.
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  8. Jami L. Anderson (1999). Annulment Retributivism: A Hegelian Theory of Punishment. Cambridge University Press 5 (4):363-388.
    Despite the bad press that retributivism often receives, the basic assumptions on which this theory of punishment rests are generally regarded as being attractive and compelling. First of these is the assumption that persons are morally responsible agents and that social practices, such as criminal punishment, must acknowledge that fact. Additionally, retributivism is committed to the claim that punishment must be proportionate to the crime, and not determined by such utilitarian concerns as the welfare of society, or the hope of (...)
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  9. Jami L. Anderson (1999). A Hegelian Theory of Punishment. Legal Theory 5 (4):363-388.
    Despite the bad press that retributivism often receives, the basic assumptions on which this theory of punishment rests are generally regarded as being attractive and compelling. First of these is the assumption that persons are morally responsible agents and that social practices, such as criminal punishment, must acknowledge that fact. Additionally, retributivism is committed to the claim that punishment must be proportionate to the crime, and not determined by such utilitarian concerns as the welfare of society, or the hope of (...)
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  10. Jami L. Anderson (1997). Reciprocity as a Justification for Retributivism. Criminal Justice Ethics 16 (1):13-25.
    Retributivism is regarded by many as an attractive theory of punishment. Its primary assumption is that persons are morally responsible agents, and it demands that the social practices of punishment acknowledge that agency. But others have criticized retributivism as being barbaric, claiming that the theory is nothing more than a rationalization for revenge that fails to offer a compelling non-consequentialist justification for the infliction of harm. Much of the contemporary philosophical literature on retributivism has attempted to meet this criticism. One (...)
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  11. George J. Annas (1975). LAW & PSYCHIATRY: When Must the Doctor Warn Others of the Potential Dangerousness of His Patient's Condition? Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 3 (2):2-2.
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  12. H. W. Arthurs (1999). Global Code of Legal Ethics for the Transnational Legal Field, A. Legal Ethics 2:59.
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  13. Andrew Ashworth & Meredith Blake (2004). Ethics and the Criminal Defence Lawyer. Legal Ethics 7 (2):167-189.
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  14. Lesley Austen, Bryony Gilbert, Jackie Heath & Robert Mitchell (1998). Lawyers and the Media. Legal Ethics 1 (2):109-116.
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  15. Silas Blake Axtell (1950). A Paper on the Contigent Fee, Leagl Aid and Ethics. The Hague,M. Nijhoff.
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  16. Ejarra Batu Balcha (2014). Functional Inter-Textuality in the Spoken and Written Genres of Legal Statutes: A Discursive Analysis of Judge's Summing-Up and Lawyers’ Closing Arguments in Adama High Criminal Court. Studies in Logic, Grammar and Rhetoric 38 (1):7-25.
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  17. Reza Banakar (2007). Whose Experience is the Measure of Justice. Legal Ethics 10:209.
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  18. David W. Barnes (2005). Imwinkelried's Argument for Normative Ethical Testimony. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 33 (2):234-241.
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  19. Paula Baron (2011). The Emperor's New Clothes : From Atticus Finch to Denny Crane. In Reid Mortensen, Francesca Bartlett & Kieran Tranter (eds.), Alternative Perspectives on Lawyers and Legal Ethics: Reimagining the Profession. Routledge.
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  20. Francesca Bartlett (2011). The Role of Apologies in Lawyers' Professional Discipline. Legal Ethics 14 (1):49-72.
    We live in times of 'apology mania', says Lee Taft, or at least 'national conversation' about the role and meaning of apologies. Roy Brooks talks of an 'age of apology'. Some 10 years after these pronouncements, little has changed. Apologies are ubiquitous and debated in the public and political domain. And they continue to be used and imported into legal jurisdictions. For instance, legislation removes civil liability for saying 'sorry' in certain contexts and may reward apologies in mitigation of sentence.
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  21. Francesca Bartlett & Reid Mortensen (2009). Integrity in Legal Practice: A Report From the Third International Legal Ethics Conference, Gold Coast, Australia. Legal Ethics 12 (1):100.
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  22. Michele Beardslee (2009). Advocacy in the Court of Public Opinion Part I: Broadening the Role of Corporate Attorneys, 22 Geo. J. Legal Ethics 1259.
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  23. Mario Bengzon (1953). Practical Exercises and Legal Ethics Bar Reviewer. Manila, Lawyers Co-Operative Pub. Co..
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  24. Leonard Berlin (1977). Countersuing the Attorney to Stop Frivolous Lawsuits. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 5 (4):3-4.
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  25. Christof Bernhart (2011). Die Professionellen Standards des Rechtsanwalts: Ein Handbuch Zum Anwaltsrecht. Dike.
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  26. Joan E. Bertin & Mary S. Henifin (1994). Science, Law, and the Search for Truth in the Courtroom: Lessons From Daubert V. Merrell Dow. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 22 (1):6-20.
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  27. Joseph Bien (1994). Schedler and How Lawyers Should Be Prohibited From Misleading Juries. Southwest Philosophy Review 10 (2):165-166.
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  28. Geoffrey Bindman (2001). The Ethics And Conduct Of Lawyers In England and Wales. Legal Ethics 4 (2):146-149.
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  29. Pamela Bluh (2006). "Open Access," Legal Publishing, and Online Repositories. Journal of Law, Medicine Ethics 34 (1):126-130.
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  30. Michael Bohlander (1998). Lawyers and the Media: German Experience. Legal Ethics 1 (2):126-129.
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  31. Edwin Bolte (1928). Ethics for Success at the Bar. Baltimore, Waverly Press, Inc..
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  32. Alison Bone (2008). The (Scottish) Elephant in the Corner: Legal Ethics in the Curriculum. Legal Ethics 11 (1):11-15.
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  33. Andrew Boon (2008). The Ethics and Conduct of Lawyers in England and Wales. Hart.
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  34. Andrew Boon (2004). Cause Lawyers and the Alternative Ethical Paradigm: Ideology and Transgression. Legal Ethics 7:250.
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  35. Andrew Boon (2002). Ethics in Legal Education and Training: Four Reports, Three Jurisdictions and a Prospectus. Legal Ethics 5 (1-2):1-2.
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  36. Andrew Boon & Susan Nash (2006). Special Advocacy: Political Expediency and Legal Roles in Modern Judicial Systems. Legal Ethics 9 (1):101-124.
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  37. Peter Boswell (2004). Justice for Public Service Employees? Legal Ethics 7 (2):155-158.
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  38. Richard M. Bowers (1969). A Lawyer Writes. BioScience 19 (4):301-301.
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  39. J. F. Bowman, Michele Fields, Tom Rice & Arlene Greenspan (2007). Children, Teens, Motor Vehicles and the Law. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 35 (s4):81-82.
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  40. Ian Boyd (2007). Australia and New Zealand Representative. The Chesterton Review 33 (1/2):417-417.
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  41. Bill Braithwaite (2003). Personal Injury Lawyer's Ethics. Legal Ethics 6 (1):7-9.
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  42. Joanne P. Braithwaite (2011). Diversity Staff and the Dynamics of Diversity Policy-Making in Large Law Firms. Legal Ethics 13 (2):141-163.
    A number of high-profile campaigns relating to diversity have focussed on the large law firm sector since the mid-2000s. Reflecting on what has been called the 'diversity approach' to equality management, they have emphasised voluntary action based on business case reasoning. This paper considers the impact of these campaigns in practice, focusing on the dynamics of diversity policy-making within firms. Drawing upon empirical work conducted in large law firms, it explores the perspective of newly appointed diversity staff who have day (...)
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  43. Lee Bridges (2006). The Ethics of Representation on Guilty Pleas. Legal Ethics 9 (1):80-100.
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  44. David O. Brink (2012). Retributivism and Legal Moralism. Ratio Juris 25 (4):496-512.
    This article examines whether a retributivist conception of punishment implies legal moralism and asks what liberalism implies about retributivism and moralism. It makes a case for accepting the weak retributivist thesis that culpable wrongdoing creates a pro tanto case for blame and punishment and the weak moralist claim that moral wrongdoing creates a pro tanto case for legal regulation. This weak moralist claim is compatible with the liberal claim that the legal enforcement of morality is rarely all‐thing‐considered desirable. Though weak (...)
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  45. Peter A. Briss, Ned Calonge, Eileen Cody & Daniel M. Fox (2007). Closing the Gap Between Science and Law. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 35 (s4):92-96.
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  46. John Briton & Scott McLean (2008). Incorporated Legal Practices: Dragging the Regulation of the Legal Profession Into the Modern Era. Legal Ethics 11 (2):241-254.
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  47. Alexander D. Brooks (1995). Megan's Law: The Legal Issues. Criminal Justice Ethics 14 (2):12-16.
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  48. Sylvia Brown (2005). A True Meeting of Minds: A Conference Report From Japan. Legal Ethics 8 (1):12-15.
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  49. Donna Buckingham (2012). Disciplining Lawyers in New Zealand: Re-Pinning the Badge of 'Professionalism'. Legal Ethics 15 (1):57-82.
    On 1 August 2008 the Lawyers and Conveyancers Act 2006 came into force. It provides the terms of the current regulatory bargain struck between the state and the New Zealand legal profession. Barely 16 months later the profession was served notice that the basis of that bargain might radically change. To an academic lawyer with a practising certificate, this is both a tantalising research opportunity as well as a professionally unsettling prospect. Part 1 of this paper explores the current regime (...)
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  50. Donna Buckingham (2012). Putting the Legal House in Order: Responses to New Zealand Lawyers Who Break Trust. Legal Ethics 15 (2):315-334.
    Governance and discipline of the legal profession is a highly topical issue in the New Zealand and has been the subject of recent reform, with a move to a more co-regulatory structure. An explanation of that context follows, together with an overview of how the Disciplinary Tribunal under the Law Practitioners Act 1982 and its successor under the Lawyers and Conveyancers Act 2006 approach strike-off or suspension as the penalty in what would currently be termed 'misconduct' cases. Case studies and (...)
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