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  1. Elizabeth Anderson (2009). Toward a Non-Ideal, Relational Methodology for Political Philosophy: Comments on Schwartzman's "Challenging Liberalism". Hypatia 24 (4):130 - 145.
  2. Susan E. Babbitt (2005). Reasons, Explanation, and Saramago's Bell. Hypatia 20 (4):144-163.
    : In this essay, I suggest that significant insights of recent feminist philosophy lead, among other things, to the thought that it is not always better to choose than to be compelled to do what one might have done otherwise. However, few feminists, if any, would defend such a suggestion. I ask why it is difficult to consider certain ideas that, while challenging in theory, are, nonetheless, rather unproblematic in practice. I suggest that some questions are not pursued seriously enough (...)
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  3. Amy Baehr (2013). Liberal Feminism: Comprehensive and Political. In Feminist Interpretations of John Rawls. 150-166.
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  4. Amy R. Baehr (2013). Liberal Feminism. In Edward Zalta (ed.), Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  5. Nancy Bauer (2007). The Second Feminism. Symposia on Gender, Race, and Philosophy.
  6. Elizabeth Brake (2012). Minimizing Marriage: Marriage, Morality, and the Law. OUP USA.
    Even in secular and civil contexts, marriage retains sacramental connotations. Yet what moral significance does it have? This book examines its morally salient features - promise, commitment, care, and contract - with surprising results. In Part One, "De-Moralizing Marriage," essays on promise and commitment argue that we cannot promise to love and so wedding vows are (mostly) failed promises, and that marriage may be a poor commitment strategy. The book contends with the most influential philosophical accounts of the moral value (...)
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  7. Cynthia B. Bryson (1998). Mary Astell: Defender of the "Disembodied Mind". Hypatia 13 (4):40 - 62.
    This paper demonstrates how Mary Astell's version of Cartesian dualism supports her disavowal of female subordination and traditional gender roles, her rejection of Locke's notion of "thinking matter" as a major premise for rejecting his political philosophy of "social contracts" between men and women, and, finally, her claim that there is no intrinsic difference between genders in terms of ratiocination, the primary assertion that grants her the title of the first female English feminist.
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  8. Clare Chambers (2008). Sex, Culture, and Justice: The Limits of Choice. Penn State Press.
    In this book, Clare Chambers argues that this predicament poses a fundamental challenge to many existing liberal and multicultural theories that dominate contemporary political philosophy.
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  9. Farrell & James P. Sterba (2008). Does Feminism Discriminate Against Men?: A Debate. OUP USA.
    Does feminism give a much-needed voice to women in a patriarchal world? Or is the world not really patriarchal? Has feminism begun to level the playing field in a world in which women are more often paid less at work and abused at home? Or are women paid equally for the same work and not abused more at home? Does feminism support equality in education and in the military, or does it discriminate against men by ignoring such issues as male-only (...)
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  10. Marilyn Friedman (1991). DOES SOMMERS LIKE WOMEN?: MORE ON LIBERALISM, GENDER HIERARCHY, AND SCARLETT O'HARA. Journal of Social Philosophy 21 (2-3):75-90.
  11. Nanette Funk (2013). Contra Fraser on Feminism and Neoliberalism. Hypatia 28 (1):179-196.
    This article is a critical examination of Nancy Fraser's contrast of early second-wave feminism and contemporary global feminism in “Feminism, Capitalism and the Cunning of History,” (Fraser ). Fraser contrasts emancipatory early second-wave feminism, strongly critical of capitalism, with feminism in the age of neoliberalism as being in a “dangerous liaison” with neoliberalism. I argue that Fraser's historical account of 1970s mainstream second-wave feminism is inaccurate, that it was not generally anti-capitalist, critical of the welfare system, or challenging the priority (...)
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  12. Kevin M. Graham (2002). The Ideal of Objectivity in Political Dialogue: Liberal and Feminist Approaches. Social Epistemology 16 (3):295 – 309.
  13. Carol Hay (2013). Kantianism, Liberalism, and Feminism: Resisting Oppression. Palgrave Macmillan.
    This is a book about the harms of oppression, and about addressing these harms using the resources of liberalism and Kantianism. Its central thesis is that people who are oppressed are bound by the duty of self-respect to resist their own oppression. In it, I defend certain core ideals of the liberal tradition—specifically, the fundamental importance of autonomy and rationality, the intrinsic and inalienable dignity of the individual, and the duty of self-respect—making the case that these ideals are pivotal in (...)
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  14. Christine James (1995). Feminist Ethics, Mothering, and Caring. Kinesis 22 (2):2-16.
    The relationship between feminist theory and traditionally feminine activities like mothering and caring is complex, especially because of the current diversity of feminist scholarship. There are many different kinds of feminist theory, and each approaches the issue of women's oppression from its own angle. The statement, "feminist ethics is about mothering and caring," can be critically evaluated by outlining specific feminist approaches to ethics and showing what role mothering and caring play in each particular view. In this paper, feminine and (...)
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  15. Kate Nash (1998). Universal Difference: Feminism and the Liberal Undecidability of "Women". St. Martin's Press.
  16. Julinna C. Oxley (2011). Liberal Feminism. In Michael Bruce & Steven Barbone (eds.), Just the Arguments: 100 of the Most Important Arguments in Western Philosophy. Wiley-Blackwell. 258--262.
  17. Reed Richter (1991). “Leckie on Fatal Attraction”. APA Newsletter on Feminism. 90 (Winter).
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  18. Debra Satz & Rob Reich (eds.) (2009). Toward a Humanist Justice: The Political Philosophy of Susan Moller Okin. OUP USA.
    The late Susan Moller Okin was a leading political theorist whose scholarship integrated political philosophy and issues of gender, the family, and culture. Okin argued that liberalism, properly understood as a theory opposed to social hierarchies and supportive of individual freedom and equality, provided the tools for criticizing the substantial and systematic inequalities between men and women. Her thought was deeply informed by a feminist view that theories of justice must apply equally to women as men, and she was deeply (...)
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  19. Lisa H. Schwartzman (2007). Can Liberalism Account for Women's “Adaptive Preferences”? Social Philosophy Today 23:175-186.
    Feminist philosophers have questioned whether liberal theory can account for the phenomenon of adaptive preferences, specifically women’s preferences that are formed under conditions of sexist oppression. In this paper, I examine the argument of one feminist who addresses the problem of women’s “deformed desires” by relying on a liberal framework. Assessing her argument, I conclude that liberalism provides inadequate resources for responding to this issue since it errs in understanding adaptive preferences as exceptional, provides little explanation of how changes in (...)
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  20. Gail Tulloch (1989). Mill's Epistemology in Practice in His Liberal Feminism. Educational Philosophy and Theory 21 (2):32–39.
  21. Helga Varden (2012). A Feminist, Kantian Conception of the Right to Bodily Integrity: The Cases of Abortion and Homosexuality. In Sharon Crasnow & Anita Superson (eds.), Out of the Shadows: Analytical Feminist Contributions to Traditional Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
    Pregnant women and persons engaging in homosexual practices compose two groups that have been and still are amongst those most severely subjected to coercive restrictions regarding their own bodies. From an historical point of view, it is a recent and rare phenomenon that a woman’s right to abortion and a person’s right to engage in homosexual interactions are recognized. Although most Western liberal states currently do recognize these rights, they are under continuous assault from various political and religious movements. Moreover, (...)
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  22. Rebecca Whisnant (2007). Review of Lisa Schwartzman, Challenging Liberalism: Feminism As Political Critique. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2007 (3).
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  23. Stacey Young (1997). Changing the Wor(L)D: Discourse, Politics, and the Feminist Movement. Routledge.
    Changing the Wor(l)d draws on feminist publishing, postmodern theory and feminist autobiography to powerfully critique both liberal feminism and scholarship on the women's movement, arguing that both ignore feminism's unique contributions to social analysis and politics. These contributions recognize the power of discourse, the diversity of women's experiences, and the importance of changing the world through changing consciousness. Young critiques social movement theory and five key studies of the women's movement, arguing that gender oppression can be understood only in relation (...)
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