Related categories
Siblings:
44 found
Search inside:
(import / add options)   Sort by:
  1. Sami Alsolamy (2014). Islamic Views on Artificial Nutrition and Hydration in Terminally Ill Patients. Bioethics 28 (2):96-99.
    Withholding and withdrawing artificial nutrition and hydration from terminally ill patients poses many ethical challenges. The literature provides little information about the Islamic beliefs, attitudes, and laws related to these challenges. Artificial nutrition and hydration may be futile and reduce quality of life. They can also harm the terminally ill patient because of complications such as aspiration pneumonia, dyspnea, nausea, diarrhea, and hypervolemia. From the perspective of Islam, rules governing the care of terminally ill patients are derived from the principle (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. George J. Annas (1991). The Long Dying of Nancy Cruzan. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 19 (1-2):52-59.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Joachim Asscher (2007). Killing and Letting Die: The Similarity Criterion. Journal of Applied Philosophy 24 (3):271–282.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Ines M. Barrio-Cantalejo, Pablo Simón-Lorda, Adoración Molina-Ruiz, Fátima Herrera-Ramos, Encarnación Martínez-Cruz, Rosa Maria Bailon-Gómez, Antonio López-Rico & Patricia Peinado Gorlat (2013). Stability Over Time in the Preferences of Older Persons for Life-Sustaining Treatment. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 10 (1):103-114.
    Objective: To measure the stability of life-sustaining treatment preferences amongst older people and analyse the factors that influence stability. Design: Longitudinal cohort study. Setting: Primary care centres, Granada (Spain). Eighty-five persons age 65 years or older. Participants filled out a questionnaire with six contexts of illness (LSPQ-e). They had to decide whether or not to receive treatment. Participants completed the questionnaire at baseline and 18 months later. Results: 86 percent of the patients did not change preferences. Sex, age, marital status, (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Michael K. Bartalos (ed.) (2009). Speaking of Death: America's New Sense of Mortality. Praeger.
    As the team in this volume shows through groundbreaking research, surveys, interviews, and vignettes, death awareness has grown strong, and has changed the way ...
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. John Baum (2003). When Death Enters Life. Floris.
  7. Ernest Becker (1973). The Denial of Death. New York,Free Press.
    Drawing from religion and the human sciences, particularly psychology after Freud, the author attempts to demonstrate that the fear of death is man's central ...
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Francis J. Beckwith (2013). Stephen W. Smith: End-of-Life Decisions in Medical Care: Principles and Policies for Regulating the Dying Process. [REVIEW] Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 34 (6):499-504.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Samuel C. M. Birch (2013). The Dead Donor Rule: A Defense. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 38 (4):426-440.
    Miller, Truog, and Brock have recently argued that the “dead donor rule,” the requirement that donors be determined to be dead before vital organs are procured for transplantation, cannot withstand ethical scrutiny. In their view, the dead donor rule is inconsistent with existing life-saving practices of organ transplantation, lacks a cogent ethical rationale, and is not necessary for maintenance of public trust in organ transplantation. In this paper, the second of these claims will be evaluated. (The first and third are (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. James Bopp & Thomas J. Marzen (1991). Cruzan: Facing the Inevitable. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 19 (1-2):37-51.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Joseph Boyle (2004). Medical Ethics and Double Effect: The Case of Terminal Sedation. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 25 (1):51-60.
    The use of terminal sedation to control theintense discomfort of dying patients appearsboth to be an established practice inpalliative care and to run counter to the moraland legal norm that forbids health careprofessionals from intentionally killingpatients. This raises the worry that therequirements of established palliative care areincompatible with moral and legal opposition toeuthanasia. This paper explains how thedoctrine of double effect can be relied on todistinguish terminal sedation from euthanasia. The doctrine of double effect is rooted inCatholic moral casuistry, but (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Michael M. Burgess (1993). The Medicalization of Dying. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 18 (3):269-279.
    Physician assisted suicide or active euthanasia is analyzed as a medicalization of the needs of persons who are suffering interminably. As with other medicalized responses to personal needs, the availability of active euthanasia will likely divert attention and resources from difficult social and personal aspects of the needs of dying and suffering persons, continuing the pattern of privatization of the costs of caregiving for persons who are candidates for active euthanasia, limiting the ability of caregivers to assist suffering persons to (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Norman L. Cantor (2001). Twenty-Five Years After Quinlan: A Review of the Jurisprudence of Death and Dying. [REVIEW] Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 29 (2):182-196.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Alexander Morgan Capron (1991). Medical Decision-Making and the Right to Die After Cruzan. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 19 (1-2):5-8.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Vanessa Carbonell (2013). Interactive Capacity, Decisional Capacity, and a Dilemma for Surrogates. AJOB Neuroscience 4 (4):36-37.
  16. Kathy L. Cerminara (2010). The Schiavo Maelstrom's Potential Impact on the Law of End-of-Life Decision Making. In Kenneth W. Goodman (ed.), The Case of Terri Schiavo: Ethics, Politics, and Death in the 21st Century. Oxford University Press.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Donald Coggan (1977). On Dying and Dying Well. Royal Society of Medicine.
    The idea of a happy death is one that startles and disgusts modern man. However, although that phrase is not often used today, that is what the Archbishop of Canterbury, Dr Donald Coggan, is to some extent considering in his Edwin Stevens lecture given to the Royal Society of Medicine. We are publishing extracts from that lecture by kind permission of the President of the Royal Society of Medicine. We have chosen those passages in the lecture which discuss the limits (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Cynthia B. Cohen & Peter J. Cohen (1992). Required Reconsideration of "Do-Not-Resuscitate" Orders in the Operating Room and Certain Other Treatment Settings. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 20 (4):354-363.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Felicia Cohn (1999). The Ethics of End-of-Life Care for Prison Inmates. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 27 (3):252-259.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Ronald E. Cranford (2010). A Common Uniqueness : Medical Facts in the Schiavo Case. In Kenneth W. Goodman (ed.), The Case of Terri Schiavo: Ethics, Politics, and Death in the 21st Century. Oxford University Press.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Ezio Di Nucci (2013). Withdrawing Artificial Nutrition and Patients' Interests. Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (9):555-556.
    I argue that the arguments brought by Counsel for M to the English Court of Protection are morally problematic in prioritising subjective interests that are the result of ‘consistent autonomous thought’ over subjective interests that are the result of a more limited cognitive perspective.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. John Donnelly (ed.) (1994). Language, Metaphysics, and Death. Fordham University Press.
    This standard work in thanatology is updated with ten essays new to the second edition, and features a new introduction by Donnelly. The collection addresses certain basic issues inherent in a philosophy of death.
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Gerald Dworkin (2007). Pt. IV. The End of Life. The Definition of Death / Stuart Youngner ; The Aging Society and the Expansion of Senility: Biotechnological and Treatment Goals / Stephen Post ; Death is a Punch in the Jaw: Life-Extension and its Discontents / Felicia Nimue Ackerman ; Precedent Autonomy, Advance Directives, and End-of-Life Care / John K. Davis ; Physician-Assisted Death: The State of the Debate. [REVIEW] In Bonnie Steinbock (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Bioethics. Oxford University Press.
  24. Jon B. Eisenberg (2010). The Continuing Assault on Personal Autonomy in the Wake of the Schiavo Case. In Kenneth W. Goodman (ed.), The Case of Terri Schiavo: Ethics, Politics, and Death in the 21st Century. Oxford University Press.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Kenneth W. Goodman (2010). Terri Schiavo and the Culture Wars : Ethics Vs. Politics. In , The Case of Terri Schiavo: Ethics, Politics, and Death in the 21st Century. Oxford University Press.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Michael S. Jastremski (1984). Death and Dying: Reflections of an Intensivist. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 5 (2).
    The prolonged life support of individuals with no hope for recovery has been an unfortunate consequence of recent advances in medical technology. The use of intensive therapy in such patients is contrary to the physician's obligation to relieve suffering and also creates an enormous economic burden for society. Once the physician has determined that there is no hope for a meaningful recovery, it becomes ethically correct for him to withhold or withdraw intensive therapy from that patient provided that such an (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. L. Syd M. Johnson (2011). The Right to Die in the Minimally Conscious State. Journal of Medical Ethics 37 (37):175-178.
    The right to die has for decades been recognised for persons in a vegetative state, but there remains controversy about ending life-sustaining medical treatment for persons in the minimally conscious state (MCS). The controversy is rooted in assumptions about the moral significance of consciousness, and the value of life for patients who are conscious and not terminally ill. This paper evaluates these assumptions in light of evidence that generates concerns about quality of life in the MCS. It is argued that (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Guy Kahane & Julian Savulescu (2009). Brain-Damaged Patients and the Moral Significance of Consciousness. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 34 (1):6-26.
    Neuroimaging studies of brain-damaged patients diagnosed as in the vegetative state suggest that the patients might be conscious. This might seem to raise no new ethical questions given that in related disputes both sides agree that evidence for consciousness gives strong reason to preserve life. We question this assumption. We clarify the widely held but obscure principle that consciousness is morally significant. It is hard to apply this principle to difficult cases given that philosophers of mind distinguish between a range (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Lawrence J. Nelson (2010). Disability Rights and Wrongs in the Terri Schiavo Case. In Kenneth W. Goodman (ed.), The Case of Terri Schiavo: Ethics, Politics, and Death in the 21st Century. Oxford University Press.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Edmund D. Pellegrino (1988). For the Patient's Good: The Restoration of Beneficence in Health Care. Oxford University Press.
    In this companion volume to their 1981 work, A Philosophical Basis of Medical Practice, Pellegrino and Thomasma examine the principle of beneficence and its role in the practice of medicine. Their analysis, which is grounded in a thorough-going philosophy of medicine, addresses a wide array of practical and ethical concerns that are a part of health care decision-making today. Among these issues are the withdrawing and withholding of nutrition and hydration, competency assessment, the requirements for valid surrogate decision-making, quality-of-life determinations, (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. John Protevi, The Terri Schiavo Case: Empathy, Love, Sacrifice, Singularity.
    In the first part of this talk I show how some ideas in the new "4EA" branch of cognitive science (embodied, embedded, extended, enactive, affective), which gets away from the computer metaphor to talk about affective cognition as the direction of action of an organism, can be illuminated by Deleuze's ontology. Now that may sound ridiculous, as Deleuze's terminology is notoriously baroque – how could it ever "illuminate" anything? So I'm going to be using plain English translations of his concepts; (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Reed Richter (1988). The Hastings Center and Euthanasia. The Euthanasia Review 3 (1):56-72.
    The Hasting Center's, "Guidelines on the Termination of Life-Sustaining Treatment and the Care of the Dying" (1987), outlines a position on assisted suicide that I argue is contradictory. On one hand the guidelines offers a position on human dignity and autonomy that accords competent patients the right to intentionally kill themselves by requesting doctors to terminate life-support. Yet, on the other hand, the guidelines argue that terminating life-support upon request is not ever the moral equivalent of doctored-assisted suicide, and granting (...)
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Daniel N. Robinson (2010). Schiavo, Privacy, and the Interests of Law. In Kenneth W. Goodman (ed.), The Case of Terri Schiavo: Ethics, Politics, and Death in the 21st Century. Oxford University Press.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Susan B. Rubin (1998). When Doctors Say No: The Battleground of Medical Futility. Indiana University Press.
    Who should decide? In When Doctors Say No, philosopher and bioethicist Rubin examines this controversial issue.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. David Shaw (2011). A Defence of a New Perspective on Euthanasia. Journal of Medical Ethics 37 (2):123-125.
    In two recent papers, Hugh McLachlan, Jacob Busch and Raffaele Rodogno have criticised my new perspective on euthanasia. Each paper analyses my argument and suggests two flaws. McLachlan identifies what he sees as important points regarding the justification of legal distinctions in the absence of corresponding moral differences and the professional role of the doctor. Busch and Rodogno target my criterion of brain life, arguing that it is a necessary but not sufficient condition and that it is not generalisable. In (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. David Shaw (2007). The Body as Unwarranted Life Support: A New Perspective on Euthanasia. Journal of Medical Ethics 33 (9):519-521.
    It is widely accepted in clinical ethics that removing a patient from a ventilator at the patient’s request is ethically permissible. This constitutes voluntary passive euthanasia. However, voluntary active euthanasia, such as giving a patient a lethal overdose with the intention of ending that patient’s life, is ethically proscribed, as is assisted suicide, such as providing a patient with lethal pills or a lethal infusion. Proponents of voluntary active euthanasia and assisted suicide have argued that the distinction between killing and (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Lois L. Shepherd (2009). If That Ever Happens to Me: Making Life and Death Decisions After Terri Schiavo. University of North Carolina Press.
    Disorders of consciousness and the permanent vegetative state -- Legal and political wrangling over Terri's life -- In context--law and ethics -- Terri's wishes -- The limits of evidence -- The implications of surrogacy -- Qualities of life -- Feeding -- The preservation of life -- Respect and care : an alternative framework.
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Peter Singer, Decisions About Death Free Inquiry , August/September, 2005.
    The great irony of the work of right-to-life advocates who sought in vain to prolong Terri Schiavo's life is that all the publicity about the case has triggered a surge in the number of people completing advance declarations, making it clear that they do not wish to continue to live in circumstances like those in which Schiavo lived for the fifteen years before her death. Thus, the fight over the removal of Schiavo's feeding tube is likely to significantly increase the (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Robert M. Veatch (2004). Abandon the Dead Donor Rule or Change the Definition of Death? Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 14 (3):261-276.
    : Research by Siminoff and colleagues reveals that many lay people in Ohio classify legally living persons in irreversible coma or persistent vegetative state (PVS) as dead and that additional respondents, although classifying such patients as living, would be willing to procure organs from them. This paper analyzes possible implications of these findings for public policy. A majority would procure organs from those in irreversible coma or in PVS. Two strategies for legitimizing such procurement are suggested. One strategy would be (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Robert M. Walker & Jay Black (2010). Terri Schiavo and Televised News : Fact or Fiction? In Kenneth W. Goodman (ed.), The Case of Terri Schiavo: Ethics, Politics, and Death in the 21st Century. Oxford University Press.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Douglas N. Walton (1983). Ethics of Withdrawal of Life-Support Systems: Case Studies on Decision-Making in Intensive Care. Greenwood Press.
    " Journal of the American Medical Association "Walton has made a successful attempt to write about medical concerns without ever leaving the layperson to ...
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Jay Wolfson (2010). At Theresa Schiavo's Bedside : A Guardian's Role and Reflections. In Kenneth W. Goodman (ed.), The Case of Terri Schiavo: Ethics, Politics, and Death in the 21st Century. Oxford University Press.
    At Theresa Schiavo's bedside : a guardian's role and reflections.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Laurie Zoloth (2010). Crossing the Borderlands at Nightfall : New Issues in Moral Philosophy and Faith at the End of Life. In Kenneth W. Goodman (ed.), The Case of Terri Schiavo: Ethics, Politics, and Death in the 21st Century. Oxford University Press.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Tomasz Żuradzki (2011). Rola świadomości w decyzjach dotyczących zaprzestania podtrzymywania funkcji życiowych. Rocznik Kognitywistyczny:191-198.
    Badania przy użyciu rezonansu magnetycznego sugerują, że przynajmniej niektórzy pacjenci w tzw. stanie wegetatywnym mogą być bardziej „świadomi”, niż to się do tej pory wydawało. W artykule zamierzam omówić te badania; następnie rozważę, o jakie rozumienie pojęcia świadomości może w nich chodzić; a wreszcie zastanowię się nad etycznymi implikacjami tych odkryć. Zamierzam też rozważyć, czy posiadanie wyższych form świadomości zawsze ma być dodatkową racją przemawiającą przeciwko zaprzestaniu podtrzymywaniu funkcji życiowych. Tym samym, w artykule chciałbym wskazać istotność badań z zakresu kognitywistyki (...)
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation