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  1. B. A. (1963). Literature, Philosophy, and the Imagination. [REVIEW] Review of Metaphysics 16 (3):583-583.
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  2. Daniel Aaron’S. (2003). Re-Imagining US Literature and the Left. Historical Materialism 11 (4):395-404.
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  3. Christopher Bartel (2012). The Puzzle of Historical Criticism. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 70 (2):213-222.
    Works of fiction are often criticized for their historical inaccuracies. But this practice poses a problem: why would we criticize a work of fiction for its historical inaccuracy given that it is a work of fiction? There is an intuition that historical inaccuracies in works of fiction diminish their value as works of fiction; and yet, given that they are works of fiction, there is also an intuition that such works should be free from the constraints of historical truth. The (...)
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  4. Guy Bennett-Hunter (2014). The Travel Literature of Xavier de Maistre and its Philosophical Significance. In Garth Lean, Russell Staif & Emma Waterton (eds.), Travel and Imagination. Ashgate 75-88.
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  5. Carla Bocchetti (2003). Odyssean Ethnography C. Dougherty: The Raft of Odysseus. The Ethnographic Imagination of Homer's Odyssey. Pp. VIII + 243. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2001. Cased, £32.50. Isbn: 0-19-513036-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 53 (01):6-.
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  6. Martijn Boven (2015). Kierkegaard's Concepts: Psychological Experiment. In Jon Stewart, Steven M. Emmanuel & William McDonald (eds.), Volume 15, Tome V. Kierkegaard's Concepts: Objectivity to Sacrifice. Ashgate 159-165.
    For Kierkegaard the ‘psychological experiment’ is a literary strategy. It enables him to dramatize an existential conflict in an experimental mode. Kierkegaard’s aim is to study the source of movement that animates the existing individual (this is the psychological part). However, he is not interested in the representation of historical individuals in actual situations, but in the construction of fictional characters that are placed in hypothetical situations; this allows him to set the categories in motion “in order to observe completely (...)
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  7. Martijn Boven (2014). Kierkegaard's Concepts: Incognito. In Steven M. Emmanuel, Jon Stewart & William McDonald (eds.), Volume 15, Tome III: Kierkegaard's Concepts: Envy to Incognito. Ashgate 231-236.
    The Danish word 'incognito' means to appear in disguise, or to act under an unfamiliar, assumed name (or title) in order to avoid identification. As a concept, incognito occurs in several of Kierkegaard’s works, but only becomes a subject of reflection in two: the Concluding Unscientific Postscript to Philosophical Fragments by Johannes Climacus and Practice in Christianity by Anti-Climacus. Both pseudonyms develop the concept from their own perspective and must be understood on their own terms. Johannes Climacus treats incognito as (...)
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  8. Martijn Boven (2012). Review of Chris Danta's Literature Suspends Death: Sacrifice and Storytelling in Kierkegaard, Kafka and Blanchot. [REVIEW] Radical Philosophy 174 (july/august):51-53.
    In 'Literature Suspends Death: Sacrifice and Storytelling in Kierkegaard, Kafka and Blanchot' Chris Danta takes Genesis 22 as the starting point for an investigation of the role of literary imagination. His aim is to read the Genesis story from a literary-theoretical perspective in order to show how it can 'illuminate the secular situation of the literary writer.' To do this, Danta stages a fruitful confrontation between Søren Kierkegaard as defender of religion and inwardness and Franz Kafka and Maurice Blanchot as (...)
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  9. Andreas Dorschel (2007/08). Lakonik und Suada in der Prosa Thomas Bernhards. Thomas Bernhard Jahrbuch:215-233.
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  10. Beatrice Edgell (1930). Creative Imagination: Studies in the Psychology of Literature. By June E. Downey. International Library of Psychology, Philosophy, and Scientific Method. (London: Kegan Paul, Trench, Trübner & Co. 1929. Pp. Viii + 230. Price 10s. 6d. Net.). [REVIEW] Philosophy 5 (17):132.
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  11. Sally Fitzgerald (1997). 5. Sources and Resources: The Catholic Imagination of Flannery O'Connor. Logos 1 (1).
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  12. Stacie Friend (2012). Fiction as a Genre. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 112 (2pt2):179--209.
    Standard theories define fiction in terms of an invited response of imagining or make-believe. I argue that these theories are not only subject to numerous counterexamples, they also fail to explain why classification matters to our understanding and evaluation of works of fiction as well as non-fiction. I propose instead that we construe fiction and non-fiction as genres: categories whose membership is determined by a cluster of nonessential criteria, and which play a role in the appreciation of particular works. I (...)
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  13. Stacie Friend (2011). Fictive Utterance and Imagining II. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 85 (1):163-180.
    The currently standard approach to fiction is to define it in terms of imagination. I have argued elsewhere (Friend 2008) that no conception of imagining is sufficient to distinguish a response appropriate to fiction as opposed to non-fiction. In her contribution Kathleen Stock seeks to refute this objection by providing a more sophisticated account of the kind of propositional imagining prescribed by so-called ‘fictive utterances’. I argue that although Stock's proposal improves on other theories, it too fails to provide an (...)
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  14. Stacie Friend (2008). Imagining Fact and Fiction. In Kathleen Stock & Katherine Thomsen-Jones (eds.), New Waves in Aesthetics. Palgrave Macmillan 150-169.
  15. Dominic Griffiths (2015). The Poet as ‘Worldmaker’: T.S. Eliot and the Religious Imagination. In Francesca Knox & David Lonsdale (eds.), The Power of the Word: Poetry and the Religious Imagination. Ashgate 161-175.
    Martin Heidegger defines the world as ‘the ever non-objective to which we are subject as long as the paths of birth and death . . . keep us transported into Being’. He writes that the world is ‘not the mere collection of the countable or uncountable, familiar and unfamiliar things that are at hand . . . The world worlds’. Being able to fully and richly express how the world worlds is the task of the artist, whose artwork is the (...)
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  16. Robert Hopkins (forthcoming). Sartre. In Amy Kind (ed.), Routledge Handbook of the Philosophy of Imagination. Routledge
    In The Imaginary Sartre offers a systematic, insightful and heterodox account of imagining in many forms. Beginning with four ‘characteristics’ he takes to capture the phenomenology of imagining, he draws on considerations both philosophical and psychological to describe the deeper nature of the state that has those features. The result is a view that remains the most potent challenge to the Humean orthodoxy that to this day dominates both philosophical and psychological thinking on the topic.
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  17. Lawrence F. Hundersmarck (2003). 4. The Use of Imagination, Emotion, and the Will in a Medieval Classic: The Meditaciones Vite Christi. Logos 6 (2).
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  18. Sharon James (2007). Rimell (V.) Ovid's Lovers. Desire, Difference, and the Poetic Imagination. Pp. Viii + 235. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2006. Cased, £50, US$90. ISBN: 978-0-521-86219-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 57 (02):402-404.
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  19. Anezka Kuzmicova (2013). Outer Vs. Inner Reverberations: Verbal Auditory Imagery and Meaning-Making in Literary Narrative. Journal of Literary Theory 7 (1-2):111-134.
    It is generally acknowledged that verbal auditory imagery, the reader's sense of hearing the words on a page, matters in the silent reading of poetry. Verbal auditory imagery (VAI) in the silent reading of narrative prose, on the other hand, is mostly neglected by literary and other theorists. This is a first attempt to provide a systematic theoretical account of the felt qualities and underlying cognitive mechanics of narrative VAI, drawing on convergent evidence from the experimental cognitive sciences, psycholinguistic theory, (...)
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  20. Anezka Kuzmicova (2012). Fidelity Without Mimesis: Mental Imagery From Visual Description. In Gregory Currie, Petr Kotatko & Martin Pokorny (eds.), Mimesis: Metaphysics, Cognition, Pragmatics. College Publications
    In this paper, I oppose the common assumption that visual descriptions in prose fiction are imageable by virtue of perceptual mimesis. Based on introspection as well as convergent support from cognitive science and other disciplines, I argue that visual description (and the mental imagery it elicits), unlike narrative (and the mental imagery it elicits), often stands in no positive relation to perceptual mimesis because it lacks a structural counterpart in perceptual experience. I present an alternative way of defining the kind (...)
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  21. Anezka Kuzmicova (2012). Presence in the Reading of Literary Narrative: A Case for Motor Enactment. Semiotica 2012 (189):23-48.
    Drawing on research in narrative theory and literary aesthetics, text and discourse processing, phenomenology and the experimental cognitive sciences, this paper outlines an embodied theory of presence (i.e., the reader's sense of having entered a tangible environment) in the reading of literary narrative. Contrary to common assumptions, it is argued that there is no straightforward relation between the degree of detail in spatial description on one hand, and the vividness of spatial imagery and presence on the other. It is also (...)
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  22. J. A. Lambo (1993). The Imagination as Unifying Principle in the Works of Blake and Wordsworth. Diogenes 41 (164):59-72.
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  23. Shen-yi Liao & Tamar Szabó Gendler (forthcoming). The Problem of Imaginative Resistance (An Overview). In John Gibson & Noël Carroll (eds.), The Routledge Companion to Philosophy of Literature. Routledge
    The problem of imaginative resistance holds interest for aestheticians, literary theorists, ethicists, philosophers of mind, and epistemologists. We present a somewhat opinionated overview of the philosophical discussion to date. We begin by introducing the phenomenon of imaginative resistance. We then review existing responses to the problem, giving special attention to recent research directions. Finally, we consider the philosophical significance that imaginative resistance has—or, at least, is alleged to have—for issues in moral psychology, theories of cognitive architecture, and modal epistemology.
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  24. Shen-yi Liao, Nina Strohminger & Chandra Sekhar Sripada (2014). Empirically Investigating Imaginative Resistance. British Journal of Aesthetics 54 (3):339-355.
    Imaginative resistance refers to a phenomenon in which people resist engaging in particular prompted imaginative activities. Philosophers have primarily theorized about this phenomenon from the armchair. In this paper, we demonstrate the utility of empirical methods for investigating imaginative resistance. We present two studies that help to establish the psychological reality of imaginative resistance, and to uncover one factor that is significant for explaining this phenomenon but low in psychological salience: genre. Furthermore, our studies have the methodological upshot of showing (...)
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  25. Roland Mayer (2000). T. Breyfogle (Ed.): Literary Imagination, Ancient and Modern. Essays in Honor of David Grene . Pp. 405, Maps. Chicago and London: The University of Chicago Press, 1999. Paper, £13.50. ISBN: 0-226-07425-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 50 (02):676-.
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  26. Rafe Mcgregor (2012). Narrative, Emotion, and Insight. [REVIEW] Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 70 (3):319-321.
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  27. Kengo Miyazono & Shen-yi Liao (forthcoming). The Cognitive Architecture of Imaginative Resistance. In Amy Kind (ed.), The Routledge Handbook of Philosophy of Imagination.
    Where is imagination in imaginative resistance? -/- We seek to answer this question by connecting two ongoing lines of inquiry in different subfields of philosophy. In philosophy of mind, philosophers have been trying to understand imaginative attitudes’ place in cognitive architecture. In aesthetics, philosophers have been trying to understand the phenomenon of imaginative resistance. By connecting these two lines of inquiry, we hope to find mutual illumination of an attitude (or cluster of attitudes) and a phenomenon that have vexed philosophers. (...)
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  28. Peter Murphy (2009). The power and the imagination: the enigmatic state in Shakespeare's english history plays. Revue Internationale de Philosophie 1:41-64.
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  29. Willie van Peer (1995). Literature, Imagination, and Human Rights. Philosophy and Literature 19 (2):276-291.
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  30. Ramendra Kumar Sen (1965). Imagination in Coleridge and Abhinavagupta: A Critical Analysis of Christian and Saiva Standpoints. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 24 (1):97-107.
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  31. Ole Martin Skilleas (2006). Knowledge and Imagination in Fiction and Autobiography. Metaphilosophy 37 (2):259-276.
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  32. Alexandra Stanciu (2012). Fantastic and Visual Aspects of Thomas Owen’s Tales. Journal for Communication and Culture 2 (2):160-175.
    The importance of the visual aspects of the fantastic reverberates even into theory, as shown by several researchers throughout the last decades. These researchers distinguished themselves from their predecessors, whose definition of the fantastic implied mainly an involvement of the intellect. From the many forms it takes, we will concentrate in this article on the thematic level of the text, or, more precisely, on the use of the mirrors and other forms of reflection as a form of exploration of the (...)
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  33. David Wood (2007). Part 3. The Narrative Imaginary. Double Trouble: Narrative Imagination as a Carnival Dragon. In Peter Gratton, John Panteleimon Manoussakis & Richard Kearney (eds.), Traversing the Imaginary: Richard Kearney and the Postmodern Challenge. Northwestern University Press
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  34. Raymond Aaron Younis (1998). Nationhood and Decolonization (The English Patient). Literature/Film Quarterly 26 (1).
  35. Raymond Aaron Younis (1997). Written Among the Living. Westerly 42 (3):101-112.
  36. Raymond Aaron Younis (1996). Apropos the Last 'Post-'. Literature and Theology 10 (3):280-291.
  37. Raymond Aaron Younis (1994). Isabelle Eberhardt. In Scott Murray (ed.), Australian Cinema. Allen & Unwin
  38. Raymond Aaron Younis, Michael Griffith, James Tulip, Ross Keating & Elaine Lindsay (eds.) (1995). Religion Literature and the Arts. RLA.