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  1. Jason Aleksander (2011). Dante's Understanding of the Two Ends of Human Desire and the Relationship Between Philosophy and Theology. Journal of Religion 91 (2):158-187.
    I discuss Dante’s understanding that human existence is “ordered by two final goals” and how this understanding defines philosophy’s and theology’s respective scopes of authority in guiding human conduct. I show that, while Dante devalues the philosophical authority associated with the traditional Aristotelian emphasis on the significance of contemplative activity, he does so in order to highlight philosophy’s ethico-political authority to guide human conduct toward its “earthly beatitude.” Moreover, I argue that, although Dante subordinates earthly beatitude to spiritual beatitude, he (...)
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  2. Jason Aleksander (2010). The Aporetic Ground of Revelation’s Authority in the Divine Comedy and Dante’s Demarcation and Defense of Philosophical Authority. Essays in Medieval Studies 26:1-14.
    I discuss Dante’s understanding that human existence is “ordered by two final goals” and how, for Dante, this understanding defines philosophy’s and revelation’s respective scopes of authority in guiding human conduct. Specifically, I show that, although Dante subordinates our earthly beatitude to spiritual beatitude in a way that seems to suggest the subordination of the authority of philosophy to that of revelation, he in fact limits philosophy’s scope to an arena in which its authority is not only legitimate but also (...)
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  3. Ammon Allred (2010). How is Philosophy Possible? Blanchot on Secrecy, Ambiguity and the Care for Death. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 18 (2):149-175.
    I examine the contribution that the first part of Maurice Blancot's recit Death Sentence makes to his understanding of the relationship between philosophy and literature. I use a reading of the Kantian, transcendental account of literature in “How is Literature Possible” as the starting point for an analysis of the way in which Blanchot uses secrets in describing J.'s death in Death Sentence, linking secrecy up with the imaginary, ambiguity and dissimulation. The purpose for this refinement is to challenge the (...)
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  4. Suzy Anger (2005). Victorian Interpretation. Cornell University Press.
    Victorian scriptural hermeneutics : history, intention, and evolution -- Intertext 1 : Victorian legal interpretation -- Carlyle : between biblical exegesis and romantic hermeneutics -- Intertext 2 : Victorian science and hermeneutics : the interpretation of nature -- George Eliot's hermeneutics of sympathy -- Intertext 3 : Victorian literary criticism -- Subjectivism, intersubjectivity, and intention : Oscar Wilde and literary hermeneutics.
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  5. Antony Aumann (2013). Kierkegaard, Paraphrase, and the Unity of Form and Content. Philosophy Today 57 (4):376-387.
    On one standard view, paraphrasing Kierkegaard requires no special literary talent. It demands no particular flair for the poetic. However, Kierkegaard himself rejects this view. He says we cannot paraphrase in a straightforward fashion some of the ideas he expresses in a literary format. To use the words of Johannes Climacus, these ideas defy direct communication. In this paper, I piece together and defend the justification Kierkegaard offers for this position. I trace its origins to concerns raised by Lessing and (...)
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  6. Muḥammad ʻAlī[from old catalog] Bāmdād (1964). Adab Chīst?
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  7. Christopher Bartel (2010). The Performance of Reading. [REVIEW] Philosophical Quarterly 60 (238):220-222.
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  8. Mark Bauerlein (1998). Book Review: Literary Criticism, an Autopsy. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Literature 22 (2).
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  9. Michael Benton (2005). Literary Biography: The Cinderella Story of Literary Studies. Journal of Aesthetic Education 39 (3):44-57.
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  10. Martijn Boven (2012). Review of Chris Danta's Literature Suspends Death: Sacrifice and Storytelling in Kierkegaard, Kafka and Blanchot. [REVIEW] Radical Philosophy 174 (july/august):51-53.
    In 'Literature Suspends Death: Sacrifice and Storytelling in Kierkegaard, Kafka and Blanchot' Chris Danta takes Genesis 22 as the starting point for an investigation of the role of literary imagination. His aim is to read the Genesis story from a literary-theoretical perspective in order to show how it can 'illuminate the secular situation of the literary writer.' To do this, Danta stages a fruitful confrontation between Søren Kierkegaard as defender of religion and inwardness and Franz Kafka and Maurice Blanchot as (...)
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  11. Martijn Boven (2008). Wat vastgelegd is, misleidt ons: de Cahiers van Paul Valéry. Deus Ex Machina 127:5-6.
    Paul Valéry is de dichter die zwijgt; de denker die weigert filosoof te zijn; de schrijver die de taal in staat van beschuldiging stelt; de expert die volhoudt een amateur te zijn; de mysticus die zijn heil zoekt bij de wiskunde; de stamelaar die aan een kwaal van precisie lijdt; de Narcissus die misschien toch liever Orpheus had willen zijn. Hij is de chroniqueur van het denken en de meester van de tegenspraak. Ik probeer me hem voor te stellen. Het (...)
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  12. Eva T. H. Brann (1996). Mere Reading. Philosophy and Literature 20 (2):383-397.
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  13. R. L. Brett (1952). On Meaning in Literature. Philosophy 27 (102):228 - 237.
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  14. Myron Franklin Brightfield (1932/1968). The Issue in Literary Criticism. New York, Greenwood Press.
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  15. Noël Carroll (1997). The Intentional Fallacy: Defending Myself. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 55 (3):305-309.
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  16. Eve Coppinger (2011). Publishing on Ice. Constellations 2 (2):118-124.
    This article examines a particular shipboard newspaper situated within the centuries- long hunt for the Northwest Passage. The newspaper existed in both an original handwritten form produced on a ship in the Arctic and as a printed edition in London. An examination of the newspaper in both versions suggests the ways in which the same text can be transformed by variations on its physical form, its readers, and its temporal situation. This study shows the ways that a focus on print (...)
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  17. John Cruickshank (1964). Psychocriticism and Literary Judgement. British Journal of Aesthetics 4 (2):155-159.
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  18. David Davies (2008). The Performance of Reading: An Essay in the Philosophy of Literature by Kivy, Peter. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 66 (1):89–91.
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  19. Reviews by David Davies & Julie Van Camp (2004). Robert Stecker, Interpretation and Construction: Art, Speech, and the Law. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 62 (3):291–296.
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  20. Stephen Davies (2006). Authors' Intentions, Literary Interpretation, and Literary Value. British Journal of Aesthetics 46 (3):223-247.
    I discuss three theories regarding the interpretation of fictional literature: actual intentionalism (author's intentions constrain how their works are to be interpreted), hypothetical intentionalism (interpretations are justified as those most likely intended by a postulated author), and the value-maximizing theory (interpretations presenting the work in the most favourable light are to be preferred). I claim that actual intentionalism cannot account for the appropriateness or legitimacy of some interpretations, or alternatively that it must be weakened to the point that the considerations (...)
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  21. Stephen Davies (1996). Interpreting Contextualities. Philosophy and Literature 20 (1):20-38.
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  22. Douglas Day (1966). The Background of the New Criticism. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 24 (3):429-440.
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  23. George Dickie (2006). Intentions: Conversations and Art. British Journal of Aesthetics 46 (1):70-81.
    This paper is a continuation of a debate between Noël Carroll, who defends intentionalism, and Kent Wilson and myself, who argue that the intentions of artists are not relevant to the interpretation of works of art.
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  24. George Dickie & W. Kent Wilson (1995). The Intentional Fallacy: Defending Beardsley. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 53 (3):233-250.
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  25. T. J. Diffey (1975). Morality and Literary Criticism. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 33 (4):443-454.
    If the idea of morality is approached by way both of common sense views about morality and common philosophical accounts of it, then the meaning of the term "moral" as this is sometimes used in literary criticism must seem puzzling. the puzzle is illustrated rather than solved, but some tentative suggestions are made. for instance common notions about what morality is may be too narrow.
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  26. Carol Donnell-Kotrozo (1980). The Intentional Fallacy: An Applied Reappraisal. British Journal of Aesthetics 20 (4):356-365.
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  27. Denis Donoghue (1999). Book Review: The Practice of Reading. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Literature 23 (1).
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  28. James Downey (2007). A Fallacy in the Intentional Fallacy. Philosophy and Literature 31 (1):149-152.
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  29. Kevin Dunn (1995). Book Review: Pretexts of Authority: The Rhetoric of Authorship in the Renaissance Preface. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Literature 19 (1).
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  30. Denis Dutton, Why Intentionalism Won't Go Away.
    Considering the philosophic intelligence that has set out to discredit it, intentionalism in critical interpretation has shown an uncanny resilience. Beginning perhaps most explicitly with the New Criticism, continuing through the analytic tradition in philosophy, and culminating most recently in deconstructionism, philosophers and literary theorists have kept under sustained attack the notion that authorial intention can provide a guide to interpretation, a criterion of textual meaning, or a standard for the validation of criticism. Yet intentionalist criticism still has avid theoretical (...)
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  31. Nancy Easterlin (2000). Psychoanalysis and "the Discipline of Love". Philosophy and Literature 24 (2):261-279.
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  32. Marcia Muelder Eaton (1970). Good and Correct Interpretations of Literature. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 29 (2):227-233.
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  33. A. J. Ellis (1974). Intention and Interpretation in Literature. British Journal of Aesthetics 14 (4):315-325.
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  34. Simon Evnine, The Philosophical Basis of Midrashic Interpretation.
    Much of traditional rabbinic hermeneutics, what I call "midrashic interpretation," appears to be of such a bizarre nature as to require some sort of explanation, or even justification. This essay attempts to provide a philosophical foundation for midrashic interpretation by placing it in the context of the idea (vaguely neo-platonic) that God is only fully realized as the result of a certain process, a process of which midrashic interpretation is an essential part. In the final section I attempt to spell (...)
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  35. Susan L. Feagin (1980). Motives and Literary Criticism. Philosophical Studies 38 (4):403 - 418.
    I argue that it is implausible to think that motives, As distinguished from intentions, Are relevant to literary criticism. The considerations leading to this conclusion offer some insights into the continuing debate over the relevance of artist's intentions to criticism. I also examine briefly why motives are not relevant to aesthetic judgments even though they are (plausibly) relevant to ethical ones. Some views of anscombe on intentions are discussed.
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  36. Gene Fendt (2009). Sweet Use: Genre and Performance of the Merchant of Venice. Philosophy and Literature 33 (2):pp. 280-295.
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  37. Gene Fendt (1995). Resolution, Catharsis, Culture: As You Like It. Philosophy and Literature 19 (2):248-260.
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  38. John Gibson (2013). Representation and the Novel. The Henry James Review 34 (3):220-231.
  39. John Gibson (2006). Interpreting Words, Interpreting Worlds. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 64 (4):439–450.
    It is often assumed that literary meaning is essentially linguistic in nature and that literary interpretation is therefore a purely linguistic affair. This essay identifies a variety of literary meaning that cannot be reduced to linguistic meaning. Meaning of this sort is generated not by a communicative act so much as through a creative one: the construction of a fictional world. The way in which a fictional world can bear meaning turns out to be strikingly unlike the way a sentence (...)
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  40. Stan Godlovitch (1997). Is There a Critic in the House? Philosophy and Literature 21 (2):368-375.
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  41. Alan H. Goldman (1990). Interpreting Art and Literature. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 48 (3):205-214.
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  42. Vivienne Gray (1998). The Framing of Socrates: The Literary Interpretation of Xenophon's Memorabilia. Franz Steiner.
    The work is proven to have a unified and sustained rhetorical argument. It imitates the philosophical process that it attributes to Socrates.
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  43. Daniel Green (2003). Literature Itself: The New Criticism and Aesthetic Experience. Philosophy and Literature 27 (1):62-79.
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  44. Garry Hagberg (1995). Book Review: Meaning and Interpretation: Wittgenstein, Henry James, and Literary Knowledge. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Literature 19 (2).
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  45. Helmut A. Hatzfeld (1947). Literary Criticism Through Art and Art Criticism Through Literature. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 6 (1):1-21.
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  46. Paul Hernadi (ed.) (1989). The Rhetoric of Interpretation and the Interpretation of Rhetoric. Duke University Press.
    The Rhetoric of Interpretation Hayden White Contemporary thought about the nature of interpretation, especially in the human and social sciences, ...
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  47. H. L. Hix (1990). Morte D'author: An Autopsy. Temple University Press.
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  48. Lawrence W. Hyman (1979). Moral Attitudes and the Literary Experience. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 38 (2):159-165.
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  49. Lawrence W. Hyman (1971). Literature and Morality in Contemporary Criticism. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 30 (1):83-86.
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  50. Alec Hyslop (1983). The Correct Reading of a Literary Work of Art. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 61 (2):152 – 159.
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