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  1. Jane Adamson, Richard Freadman & David Parker (eds.) (1998). Renegotiating Ethics in Literature, Philosophy, and Theory. Cambridge University Press.
    Is it possible for postmodernism to offer viable, coherent accounts of ethics? Or are our social and intellectual worlds too fragmented for any broad consensus about the moral life? These issues have emerged as some of the most contentious in literary and philosophical studies. In Renegotiating Ethics in Literature, Philosophy, and Theory a distinguished international gathering of philosophers and literary scholars address the reconceptualisations involved in this 'turn towards ethics'. An important feature of this has been a renewed interest in (...)
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  2. Ian W. Alexander (1985). French Literature and the Philosophy of Consciousness: Phenomenological Essays. St. Martin's Press.
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  3. Derek Allan (1995). An Inhuman Transcendence: Perken in Malraux's 'La Voie Royale’. Journal of European Studies 25:109-121.
    Examines an aspect of Malraux's exploration of action as a value.
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  4. Julia Annas (1982). Plato on the Triviality of Literature. In J. M. E. Moravcsik & Philip Temko (eds.), Plato on Beauty, Wisdom, and the Arts. Rowman and Littlefield
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  5. Antony Aumann (2014). The Relationship Between Aesthetic Value and Cognitive Value. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 72 (2):117-127.
    It is sometimes held that “the aesthetic” and “the cognitive” are separate categories. Enterprises concerning the former and ones concerning the latter have different aims and values. They require distinct modes of attention and reward divergent kinds of appreciation. Thus, we must avoid running together aesthetic and cognitive matters. In this paper, I challenge the independence of these categories, but in unorthodox fashion. Most attempts proceed by arguing that cognitive values can bear upon aesthetic ones. I approach from the opposite (...)
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  6. Robert C. Baldwin (1950). An Introduction to Philosophy Through Literature. New York, Ronald Press Co..
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  7. Christopher Bartel (2012). The Puzzle of Historical Criticism. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 70 (2):213-222.
    Works of fiction are often criticized for their historical inaccuracies. But this practice poses a problem: why would we criticize a work of fiction for its historical inaccuracy given that it is a work of fiction? There is an intuition that historical inaccuracies in works of fiction diminish their value as works of fiction; and yet, given that they are works of fiction, there is also an intuition that such works should be free from the constraints of historical truth. The (...)
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  8. Roland Barthes (1975). The Pleasure of the Text. Noonday Press.
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  9. N. S. Boone (2009). Escaping Emersonian Egocentrism : Poe's Moral Tales of the Haunting Other. In Donald R. Wehrs & David P. Haney (eds.), Levinas and Nineteenth-Century Literature: Ethics and Otherness From Romanticism Through Realism. University of Delaware Press
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  10. Patrick Braybrooke (1927). Thomas Hardy and His Philosophy. New York,Haskell House.
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  11. Sara Brill (2009). Violence and Vulnerability in Aeschylus' Suppliants. In William Robert Wians (ed.), Logos and Muthos: Philosophical Essays in Greek Literature. State University of New York Press
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  12. John Crombie Brown (1879). The Ethics of George Eliot's Works. Port Washington, N.Y.,Kennikat Press.
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  13. Mary Bryden & Margaret Topping (eds.) (2009). Beckett's Proust/Deleuze's Proust. Palgrave Macmillan.
    This book is an encounter between Deleuze the philosopher, Proust the novelist, and Beckett the writer creating interdisciplinary and inter-aesthetic bridges between them, covering textual, visual, sonic and performative phenomena, including provocative speculation about how Proust might have responded to Deleuze and Beckett.
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  14. Anthony J. Cascardi (2010). Tragedy and Philosophy. In Garry Hagberg & Walter Jost (eds.), A Companion to the Philosophy of Literature. Wiley-Blackwell
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  15. Rose Cherubin (2009). Alētheia From Poetry Into Philosophy: Homer to Parmenides. In William Robert Wians (ed.), Logos and Muthos: Philosophical Essays in Greek Literature. State University of New York Press
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  16. Christopher Clausen (1986). The Moral Imagination: Essays on Literature and Ethics. University of Iowa Press.
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  17. Catherine Collobert (2009). Philosophical Readings of Homer : Ancient and Contemporary Insights. In William Robert Wians (ed.), Logos and Muthos: Philosophical Essays in Greek Literature. State University of New York Press
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  18. Francis Macdonald Cornford (1923). Greek Religious Thought, From Homer to the Age of Alexander. New York, Ams Press.
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  19. Walter Clyde Curry (1959). Shakespeare's Philosophical Patterns. Gloucester, Mass.,P. Smith.
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  20. Thomas Davidson (1906). The Philosophy of Goethe's Faust. New York, Haskell House.
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  21. Renée M. Deacon (1973). Bernard Shaw as Artist-Philosopher: An Exposition of Shavianism. [Folcroft, Pa.]Folcroft Library Editions.
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  22. Sarah Demeuse (2004). Aesthetic Theory in 20th-Century Spain: "Style" in José Ortega y Gasset, María Zambrano and Eugenio D'Ors. Dissertation, University of California, Berkeley
    This critical reading of the concept of style in 20th-century Spanish aesthetic thought ranges from Eugenio d'Ors' 1908 Glosari Catala via Jose Ortega y Gasset's 1913 Meditaciones del Quiiote to Maria Zambrano's 1981 La Espana de Galdos. In redrawing the theoretical boundaries of the notion of style, these writers develop a non-essentialist understanding of the term. Style articulates a "bindingness" of culture , either by enabling critical cultural reflection or by ordering what is experienced as a chaotic culture . My (...)
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  23. Cora Diamond (2010). Henry James, Moral Philosophers, Moralism. In Garry Hagberg & Walter Jost (eds.), A Companion to the Philosophy of Literature. Wiley-Blackwell
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  24. L. A. C. Dobrez (1986). The Existential and its Exits: Literary and Philosophical Perspectives on the Works of Beckett, Ionesco, Genet, & Pinter. St. Martin's Press.
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  25. Patrick Kiaran Dooley (2008). A Community of Inquiry: Conversations Between Classical American Philosophy and American Literature. Kent State University Press.
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  26. Andreas Dorschel (2015). Passions of the Intellect: A Study of Polemics. Philosophy 90 (4):679-684.
    Polemics are a sort of critique typically suffused with inimical emotions and passions. But how are these emotions and passions to be construed? Neither authorial expression nor actual arousal properly account for their rôle in polemics. Rather, the polemicist must stage an unequal battle between a polemical self and the polemical target vis-à-vis an anticipated audience, skilfully handling, through his words, the emotions ascribed to each of them.
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  27. David Egan (2016). HARRISON, BERNARD What Is Fiction For? Literary Humanism Restored. Indiana University Press, 2015, Xxvi + 593 Pp., $85.00 Cloth, $35.00 Paper. [REVIEW] Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 74 (2):212-215.
  28. Richard Eldridge (2010). Truth in Poetry : Particulars and Universals. In Garry Hagberg & Walter Jost (eds.), A Companion to the Philosophy of Literature. Wiley-Blackwell
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  29. Richard Thomas Eldridge (ed.) (2009). The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy and Literature. Oxford University Press.
    The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy and Literature contains 23 newly commissioned essays by major philosophers and literary scholars that investigate literature ...
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  30. Oliver C. C. Ellides (1933). Shakespeare as a Scientist, His Philosophical Background: A Preliminary Study of the Questionings Explicit in His Dialogue, and of the Acceptances Implicit in His Vocabulary. Norwood Editions.
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  31. Rita Felski (2008). Uses of Literature. Blackwell Pub..
    Proposing that the interaction between reader and literature involves four “modes of textual engagement” — recognition, enchantment, knowledge, and shock — The Uses of Literature bridges the gap between literary theory and common-sense beliefs about why we read literature.
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  32. Gene Fendt (1995). Resolution, Catharsis, Culture: As You Like It. Philosophy and Literature 19 (2):248-260.
    This paper is not so much a reading of Shakespeare's play as reading through As You Like It to the kinds of resolution and catharsis that can exist in comedy. We will find two kinds of resolution and catharsis, and within each kind two sub-types. We will then read through the figures of the play and the catharses available in it to the kinds of culture that need or can use each type of catharsis.
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  33. Laurie Finke (1992). Feminist Theory, Women's Writing. Cornell University Press.
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  34. N. Georgopoulos (ed.) (1993). Tragedy and Philosophy. St. Martin's Press.
    Is philosophy, as the love of wisdom, inherently tragic? Must philosophy abolish its traditional modes of thinking if it is to attain the wisdom of tragedy? Sharing a common origin, even direction, does philosophy move beyond tragedy, epitomizing it? Is the action of tragedy analogous to the activity of philosophy? Have Hegel and Nietzsche distorted the tragic? Can there be a philosophy of the tragic? It is with such questions that the essays of this volume become involved, coming up with (...)
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  35. John Gibson (2013). Representation and the Novel. The Henry James Review 34 (3):220-231.
  36. John Gibson (2009). Literature and Knowledge. In Richard Eldridge (ed.), Oxford Handbook of Philosophy and Literature. Oxford University Press
    What is the relation between works of fiction and the acquisition of knowledge?
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  37. John Gibson, Wolfgang Huemer & Luca Pocci (2007). A Sense of The World: Essays on Fiction, Narrative, and Knowledge. In Michael Beaney (ed.), The Analytic Turn: Analysis in Early Analytic Philosophy and Phenomenology. Routledge
    A team of leading contributors from both philosophical and literary backgrounds have been brought together in this impressive book to examine how works of literary fiction can be a source of knowledge. Together, they analyze the important trends in this current popular debate. The innovative feature of this volume is that it mixes work by literary theorists and scholars with work of analytic philosophers that combined together provide a comprehensive statement of the variety of ways in which works of fiction (...)
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  38. John Gibson, Luca Pocci & Wolfgang Huemer (2007). A Sense of the World: Essays on Fiction, Narrative, and Knowledge. Routledge.
    A team of leading scholars have been brought together in this impressive book to examine how works of literary fiction can be a source of knowledge. Together, they analyze the important trends in this current popular debate.
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  39. Jonathan Gilmore (2013). That Obscure Object of Desire: Pleasure in Painful Art. In Jerrold Levinson (ed.), Suffering Art Gladly: The Paradox of Negative Emotions in Art. Palgrave/Macmillan
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  40. Patrick Grant (1992). Literature and Personal Values. St. Martin's Press.
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  41. Mitchell Green (2010). How and What We Can Learn From Fiction. In Garry Hagberg & Walter Jost (eds.), A Companion to the Philosophy of Literature. Wiley-Blackwell
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  42. Daniel Greenspan (2008). The Passion of Infinity: Kierkegaard, Aristotle, and the Rebirth of Tragedy. Walter De Gruyter.
    Introduction 1 -- Ancient Greece -- Reason and the irrational : Sophocles' Oedipus tyrannus -- Psuchê : literature and moral psychology from Homer to Sophocles -- Aristotle's poetics : Oedipus and the problem of tragedy -- Psuchê redux : philosophy and the new psychology -- Psychologizing Oedipus : reason and unreason in Aristotle's ethics -- Golden age denmark -- Kierkegaard's retrieval of Greek tragedy -- Tragedy as historical idea : either/or ancient drama reflected in the modern -- Stages on life's (...)
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  43. Paul Guyer (2008). Is Ethical Criticism a Problem? : A Historical Perspective. In Garry Hagberg (ed.), Art and Ethical Criticism. Blackwell Pub. 3--32.
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  44. Garry Hagberg (ed.) (2008). Art and Ethical Criticism. Blackwell.
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  45. Garry L. Hagberg (2010). Self-Defining Reading : Literature and the Constitution of Personhood. In Garry Hagberg & Walter Jost (eds.), A Companion to the Philosophy of Literature. Wiley-Blackwell
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  46. David P. Haney (2009). Coleridge's "Historic Race" : Ethical and Political Otherness. In Donald R. Wehrs & David P. Haney (eds.), Levinas and Nineteenth-Century Literature: Ethics and Otherness From Romanticism Through Realism. University of Delaware Press
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  47. George F. Held (1995). Aristotle's Teleological Theory of Tragedy and Epic. Winter.
  48. Wolfgang Huemer (2016). Literary Style. In Noël Carroll & John Gibson (eds.), Routledge companion to philosophy of literature. Routledge
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  49. Wolfgang Huemer (2014). Sprache im literarischen Text. In Ingrid Vendrell Ferran & Christoph Demmerling (eds.), Wahrheit, Wissen Und Erkenntnis in der Literatur: Philosophische Beiträge. De Gruyter 57-70.
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  50. Wolfgang Huemer (2008). I Poeti Sono «mentitori Per Professione»? Il Valore Cognitivo Della Letteratura [are Poets «liars By Profession»? The Cognitive Value Of Literature]. la Società Degli Individui 32:9-25.
    Fin dall’antichità esiste una tensione tra filosofia e letteratura, a cui David Hume ha dato voce dicendo che i poeti sono «mentitori per professione»: i testi letterari, in quanto opere di finzione che parlano di persone che non sono mai esistite e di eventi che non sono mai accaduti, non contengono proposizioni vere. Ciò implica, però, che essi sono privi di qualsiasi valore cognitivo. Questo articolo cerca di mostrare che tale atteggiamento anticognitivista si basa su una concezione errata del progresso (...)
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