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  1. Corey Abel (2006). Stoppard’s Hapgood and the Drama of Politics and Science. Perspectives on Political Science 35 (3):143-148.
    This paper presents a detailed analysis of Stoppard's "Hapgood," in order present two related arguments. First, due to the modal differences between science and human conduct, the play must relegate science to a secondary role, in spite of the apparent primacy of science as the engine of the play's theme and plot. Second, while the drama hinges on its presentation of a fictive world very much patterned after the world of human conduct, drawing on love, friendship, patriotism, and more, it (...)
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  2. Corey Abel (2003). Love and Friendship in Utopia: Brave New World and 1984. In Eduardo Velasquez (ed.), Love and Friendship: Rethinking Politics and Affection in Modern Times.
    Contrary to many "political" interpretations, of "Brave New World" and "1984" this paper stresses that the evil of totalitarian government is not simply in the presence of great and arbitrary power, but in the particular ways that such power erodes love and friendship, the bases of social life. The crisis represented by the destruction of all possibility of love and friendship is placed in the context of Dostoevsky's meditations on "The Grand Inquisitor," and reflections by noted political theorists on the (...)
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  3. Emmanuel Alloa (2012). The Inorganic Community. Hypotheses on Literary Communism in Novalis, Benjamin and Blanchot. Boundary2. An International Journal of Literature and Culture 39 (3):75-95.
    If literary avant-garde journals and their communities have been, in the twentieth century, a space for creating, if not sustaining, major political utopias, it should help explain why this “literary communism,” as Jean-Luc Nancy called it, is not a weakened or substitutional form of politics. No myth without narration, no implementation without an instrumentation, no organic unity without a political organ voicing its claim, in short: no organicity without an organon. But can there be a (literary) community that does not (...)
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  4. Mikhail Bakhtin & Sergeiy Sandler (forthcoming). Bakhtin on Shakespeare (Excerpt From “Additions and Changes to Rabelais”). PMLA.
    This is the English translation (with a brief introduction and relatively detailed commentary) of a long excerpt from Mikhail Bakhtin's notes titled "Additions and changes to Rabelais", written in the mid-1940s with reworking his then unpublished manuscript on François Rabelais in mind. This excerpt is most notable for being the only extant text in which Bakhtin discusses and analyses Shakespear's tragedies at relative length—a discussion interesting not only as a reading of Shakespeare, but also as an unusual and revealing example (...)
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  5. Wayne Booth (1988). The Company We Keep. University of California Press.
    Wayne C. Booth argues for the relocation of ethics to the center of our engagement with literature.
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  6. M. E. Button (forthcoming). Reading Emerson in Neoliberal Times: Contesting the Abandonment of Autonomy. Political Theory.
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  7. H. G. Callaway (1999). Review of Mott, W.T and R.E. Burkholder Eds., Emersonian Circles, Essays in Honor of Joel Myerson. [REVIEW] Transactions of the C.S. Peirce Society 35 (3):629-632.
    The 14 essays assembled in this volume, along with their intensive scholarship, create somewhat the impression of a Who's Who of contemporary literary studies of Ralph Waldo Emerson and the American Transcendentalists. All has been brought together by Mott and Burkholder to honor Joel Myerson, with the words of Emerson's famous remark to Walt Whitman, "We greet You at the Mid-point of a Great Career" (p. xi). An authority on Transcendentalism, textual and bibliographical studies, Myerson has written, edited, or co-edited (...)
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  8. Suchorita Chattopadhyay (2012). Ashapurna Devi’s “Women” – Emerging Identities in Colonial and Postcolonial Bengal. ARGUMENT 2 (1):75-95.
    Ashapurna Devi, a prominent Bengali woman novelist (1909–1995) focused on women’s creativity and enlightenment during the colonial and postcolonial period in Bengal, India. She herself displayed immense will power, tenacity and an indomitable spirit which enabled her to eke out a prominent place for herself in the world of creative writing. Her life spanned both colonial India and independent India and these diverse experiences shaped her mind and persona and helped her to portray the emerging face of the enlightened Bengali (...)
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  9. Urszula Chowaniec & Marzenna Jakubczak (2012). Conceptualizing Generation and Transformation in Women’s Writing. ARGUMENT 2 (1):5-15.
    The main objective of this collection of papers is to explore ideas of generation and transformation in the context of postdependency discourse as it may be traced in women’s writing published in Bengali, Polish, Czech, Russian and English. As we believe, literature does not have merely a descriptive function or a purely visionary quality but serves also as a discursive medium, which is rhetorically sophisticated, imaginatively influential and stimulates cultural dynamics. It is an essential carrier of collective memory and a (...)
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  10. W. Corlett (2006). Book Review: Citizen-Saints: Shakespeare and Political Theology. [REVIEW] Political Theory 34 (5):657-659.
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  11. Tamás Demeter (2011). A Touch of the Dramatic. In Josef Steiff (ed.), Sherlock Holmes and Philosophy. Open Court.
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  12. Bob Dorsett (2007). Whence Cometh (or Goeth) Ghost Writers? Journal of Information Ethics 16 (1):11-12.
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  13. Alexander García Düttmann (2011). Kafka and the Life of the Letter. Constellations 18 (1):67-73.
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  14. Javier Ferreyra (2006). La Imposible Hospitalidad: Los Bárbaros En la Literatura Occidental. In Carlos Balzi & César Marchesino (eds.), Hostilidad/Hospitalidad. Universidad Nacional de Córdoba, Area de Filosofía Del Centro de Investigaciones de la Facultad de Filosofía y Humanidades.
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  15. Russell Ford (2013). Dead Letters. LIT: Literature Interpretation Theory 24 (4):299-317.
  16. Neil Forsyth (2012). 'Comfort Me With Apples': Ambivalent Allusion in Paradise Lost. The European Legacy 17 (2):185 - 196.
    Paradise Lost can be read on various levels, some of which challenge or even contradict others. The main, explicit narrative from Genesis chapters 2 and 3 is shadowed by many other related stories. Some of these buried tales question or subvert the values made explicit in the dominant narrative. An attentive reader needs to be alert to the ways in which such references introduce teasing complexities. The approach of Satan to Eve in the ninth book of Paradise Lost is loaded (...)
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  17. James Franklin (1992). Earl's Cool. [REVIEW] Quadrant 42 (10):85-86.
    Readers of “lives” of the famous know well the tendency of biography, and especially autobiography, to become steadily less interesting as the subject grows older. A predictable record of challenges met, enemies shafted, honours received and great men encountered often succeeds an account of a childhood that is a highly-coloured and unique emotional drama. Often the best pages are those on the subject’s schooldays, when the personality first tangles with the public realm. As Barry Oakley says of school in a (...)
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  18. Jeffrey Goodman (2005). Defending Author-Essentialism. Philosophy and Literature 29 (1):200-208.
    Creationism is the view that fictional individuals such as Sherlock Holmes are contingently existing abstracta that come about due to the intentional activities of authors. Author-essentialism is the stronger thesis that the author responsible for bringing a fictional individual into existence at a time is essential to the existence of that individual. Takashi Yagisawa has recently attacked this view on the following grounds: author-essentialists rely on an ontological parallelism between fictional individuals and whole works of fiction, but this parallelism fails (...)
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  19. Stuart Gray & Thomas M. Hughes (forthcoming). Gandhi's Devotional Political Thought. Philosophy East and West.
    The political thought of Mohandas K. Gandhi has been increasingly used as a paradigmatic example of hybrid political thought that developed out of a cross-cultural dialogue of eastern and western influences. With a novel unpacking of this hybridity, this article focuses on the conceptual influences that Gandhi explicitly stressed in his autobiography and other writings, particularly the works of Leo Tolstoy and the Bhagavad Gītā. This new tracing of influence in the development of Gandhi’s thought alters the substantive thrust of (...)
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  20. Dominic Griffiths (forthcoming). Looking Into the Heart of Light: Considering the Poetic Event in the Work of T.S. Eliot and Martin Heidegger. Philosophy and Literature.
    No one is quite sure what happened to T.S. Eliot in that rose-garden. What we do know is that it formed the basis for Four Quartets, arguably the greatest English poem written in the twentieth century. Luckily it turns out that Martin Heidegger, when not pondering the meaning of being, spent a great deal of time thinking and writing about the kind of event that Eliot experienced. This essay explores how Heidegger developed the concept of Ereignis, “event” which, in the (...)
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  21. Dominic Griffiths (2012). “Now and in England:” Four Quartets, Place and Martin Heidegger’s Concept of Dwelling. Yeats Eliot Review 29 (1/2):3-18.
    T.S. Eliot’s Four Quartets is foremost a meditation on the significance of place. Each quartet is named for a place which holds importance for Eliot, either because of historical or personal memory. I argue that this importance is grounded in an ontological topology, by which I mean that the poem explores the fate of the individual and his/her heritage as inextricably bound up with the notion of place. This sense of place extends beyond the borders of a single life to (...)
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  22. Dominic Griffiths (2009). Daring to Disturb the Universe: Heidegger’s Authenticity and The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock. Literator 30 (2):107-126.
    In Heidegger’s Being and Time certain concepts are discussed which are central to the ontological constitution of Dasein. This paper demonstrates the interesting manner in which some of these concepts can be used in a reading of T.S. Eliot’s The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock. A comparative analysis is performed, explicating the relevant Heideggerian terms and then relating them to Eliot’s poem. In this way strong parallels are revealed between the two men’s respective thoughts and distinct modernist sensibilities. Prufrock, (...)
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  23. Dominic Heath Griffiths (2012). 'A Raid on the Inarticulate': Exploring Authenticity, Ereignis and Dwelling in Martin Heidegger and T.S. Eliot. Dissertation, University of Auckland
    This thesis explores, thematically and chronologically, the substantial concordance between the work of Martin Heidegger and T.S. Eliot. The introduction traces Eliot's ideas of the 'objective correlative' and 'situatedness' to a familiarity with German Idealism. Heidegger shared this familiarity, suggesting a reason for the similarity of their thought. Chapter one explores the 'authenticity' developed in Being and Time, as well as associated themes like temporality, the 'they' (Das Man), inauthenticity, idle talk and angst, and applies them to interpreting Eliot's poem, (...)
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  24. Gustavo Guerra (2005). Review: Arthur Efron. Experiencing Tess of the D'Urbervilles: A Deweyan Account. Amsterdam: Rodopi, 2005. [REVIEW] Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 41 (4):870-872.
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  25. Melinda C. Hall (2014). Picturing Disability: Beggar, Freak, Citizen, and Other Photographic Rhetoric. [REVIEW] Journal of Literary and Cultural Disability Studies 8 (1):121-124.
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  26. Thomas Holden (2011). 'The Modern Disciple of the Academy': Hume, Shelley, and Sir William Drummond. Journal of Scottish Philosophy 9 (2):161-188.
    Sir William Drummond (1770?-1828) enjoyed considerable notoriety in the early nineteenth century as the author of the Academical Questions (1805), a manifesto for immaterialism that is at the same time a creative synthesis of ancient and modern forms of scepticism. In this paper I advance an interpretation of Drummond's work that emphasises his extensive employment and adaptation of Hume's own ‘Academical or Sceptical Philosophy’. I also document the impact of the Academical Questions on the contemporary philosophical scene, including its decisive (...)
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  27. Michael Anthony Istvan (2012). A Small Aid for Kooser Research. Midwestern Miscellany 40 (Fall):54-77.
    EXCERPT.--With exception to early essays by George von Glahn and Mark Sanders, serious critical scholarship on the writings of Ted Kooser began after the 1980 release of the now-classic Sure Signs, Kooser’s fifth major collection of poems. Looking back over the thirty-plus years since then, only about a dozen or so significant studies—none of which book-length—currently boulder out against the relative flatscape of secondary materials constituted mostly by quick and dirty reviews. Aside from the essays by Wes Mantooth, Allan Benn, (...)
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  28. Kirsten Jacobson (2012). Heidegger, Winnicott, and The Velveteen Rabbit: Anxiety, Toys, and the Drama of Metaphysics. In Peter Costello (ed.), Philosophy in Children's Literature. Lexington Books. 1-20.
  29. Galen A. Johnson (1984). Historicity, Narratives, and the Understanding of Human Life. Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 15:37-54.
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  30. Nicholas Joll (ed.) (2012). Philosophy and the Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy. Palgrave Macmillan.
    [Adapted from the book's back-cover:] -/- This is the ‘philosophy and. .’ book that really needed to be written – because it is about The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy. For (to paraphrase the great man himself) Hitchhiker’s is not above a little philosophy in the same way that the sea is not above the sky. Moreover: this edited collection tries hard to combine accessibility – and some humour – with rigour. The book contains an introduction, nine chapters (all originally (...)
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  31. Gerald Keaney, The Life and Times of Johnny Zerox. Philosofict Issue 2.
    A philophical fiction about the existential angst of a superhero.
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  32. Gerald Keaney (2011). DVD Review of "Memory:Video Poetry" by Synaptic Graffiti Collective. [REVIEW] Overland (202):Free online.
    In this review I compare the short video poetry on the DVD to music video clips such as are used to promote rock music.
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  33. Shawn E. Klein (2012). Harry Potter and Humanity: Choices, Love, and Death. Reason Papers 34 (1):33-41.
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  34. Blanka Knotková-Čapková (2012). Similarities and Differences in Postcolonial Bengali Women’s Writings: The Case of Mahasweta Debi and Mallika Sengupta. ARGUMENT 2 (1):97-115.
    The emancipation of women has become a strong critical discourse in Bengali literature since the 19th century. Only since the second half of the 20th century, however, have female writers markedly stepped out of the shadow of their male colleagues, and the writings on women become more and more often articulated by women themselves. In this article, I focus on particular concepts of femininity in selected texts of two outstanding writers of different generations, a prose writer, and a woman poet: (...)
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  35. Robert D. Lane (ed.) (1994). Reading the Bible: Intention, Text, Interpretation. University Press of America.
    This book argues that the best way to understand the stories of the Old and New Testaments is to consider them as human stories with sophisticated narrative techniques at play. God is a character in these stories from the beginning, and considering god as a character in a narrative proves fruitful in responding to the human voices of these stories. -/- Although many readers go to the Bible to find the revealed word of Yahweh or of the Christian God, what (...)
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  36. Robert D. Lane & Steven M. Lane, Finding Patterns in Hemingway and Camus: Construction of Meaning and Truth. Comparative Studies The Hemingway Society.
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  37. Federico Langer (2012). Mental Imagery, Emotion, and Literary Task Sets Clues Towards a Literary Neuroart. Journal of Consciousness Studies 19 (7-8):168-215.
  38. Emar Maier (forthcoming). Reported Speech in the Transition From Orality to Literacy. Glotta 89 (1):1--16.
  39. Emar Maier (2014). Language Shifts in Free Indirect Discourse. Journal of Literary Semantics 43 (2):143--167.
    In this paper I present a linguistic investigation of the literary style known as free indirect discourse within the framework of formal semantics. I will argue that a semantics for free indirect discourse involves more than a mechanism for the independent context shifting of pronouns and other deictic elements. My argumentation is fueled by literary examples of free indirect discourse involving what I call language shifts: -/- Most of the great flame-throwers were there and naturally, handling Big John de Conquer (...)
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  40. Donald N. McCloskey (1991). The Essential Rhetoric of Law, Literature, and Liberty. Critical Review 5 (2):203-223.
    Three recent books?Richard Posner's Law and Literature, Stanley Fish's Doing What Comes Naturally, and James Boyd White's Justice as Translation? struggle over the relationship of law and literature. Fish and White defend the relevance of literature to law; Posner tries to kill the nascent law and literature movement by hugging it to death. Posner's literary criticism is belles?lettristic, concerned chiefly with how ?great? a work is. Fish's is social, emphasizing the interpretative community. White attempts to make a new community, in (...)
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  41. Alfred R. Mele & Paisley Livingston (1992). Intention and Literature. Stanford French Review 16:173-196.
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  42. Daniéle Moyal-Sharrock (2009). The Fiction of Paradox: Really Feeling for Anna Karenina. In Ylva Gustafsson, Camilla Kronqvist & Michael McEachrane (eds.), Emotions and Understanding: Wittgensteinian Perspectives. Palgrave Macmillan.
    How is it that we can be moved by what we know does not exist? In this paper, I examine the so-called 'paradox of fiction', showing that it fatally hinges on cognitive theories of emotion such as Kendall Walton's pretend theory and Peter Lamarque's thought theory. I reject these theories and acknowledge the concept-formative role of genuine emotion generated by fiction. I then argue, contra Jenefer Robinson, that this 'éducation sentimentale' is not achieved through distancing, but rather through the engagement (...)
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  43. Prasita Mukherjee (2012). Revolutionizing Agency: Sameness and Difference in the Representation of Women by Rokeya Sakhawat Hossain and Mahasweta Devi. ARGUMENT 2 (1):117-127.
    In this paper the sameness and difference between two distinguished Indian authors, Rokeya Sakhawat Hossain (1880–1932) and Mahasweta Devi (b. 1926), representing two generations almost a century apart, will be under analysis in order to trace the generational transformation in women’s writing in India, especially Bengal. Situated in the colonial and postcolonial frames of history, Hossain and Mahasweta Devi may be contextualized differently. At the same time their subjects are also differently categorized; the former is not particularly concerned with subalterns (...)
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  44. María G. Navarro (2011). Review of 'The Great Ocean of Knowledge. The Influence of Travel Literature on the Work of John Locke' by Ann Talbot. [REVIEW] Seventeenth-Century News 69 (3&4):162-164.
    The resercher Ann Talbot presents in this book one of the more complex and in-depth studies ever written about the influence of travel literature on the work of the British philospher John Locke (1632-1704). At the end of the 18th century the study of travel literature was an alternative to academic studies. The philosopher John Locke recommended with enthousiasm these books as a way to comprehend human understanding. Several members of the Royal Society like John Harris (1966-1719) affirmed that the (...)
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  45. Pierre Pica & Tibor Papp (eds.) (1988). Transparence Et Opacité. Littérature Et Sciences Cognitives. Cerf.
    Une théorie de la littérature s'appuyant sur les contraintes de langue mises en évidence par la grammaire chomskyenne est-elle envisageable ? Une telle théorie peut-elle reprendre en des termes nouveaux le programme de recherche envisagé - en termes sémiotiques - par Jakobson, qui tentait de constituer une théorie générale du langage, de la poésie et de l'art ? -/- Une théorie linguistique peut-elle participer à la découverte de nouvelles formes littéraires dont elle s'enrichirait en retour ? C'est ce que suggère (...)
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  46. Charles R. Pigden (2012). A 'Sensible Knave'? Hume, Jane Austen and Mr Elliot. Intellectual History Review 22 (3):465-480.
    This paper deals with what I take to be one woman’s literary response to a philosophical problem. The woman is Jane Austen, the problem is the rationality of Hume’s ‘sensible knave’, and Austen’s response is to deepen the problem. Despite his enthusiasm for virtue, Hume reluctantly concedes in the EPM that injustice can be a rational strategy for ‘sensible knaves’, intelligent but selfish agents who feel no aversion towards thoughts of villainy or baseness. Austen agrees, but adds that ABSENT CONSIDERATIONS (...)
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  47. Marja Rytkӧnen (2012). Memorable Fiction. Evoking Emotions and Family Bonds in Post-Soviet Russian Women’s Writing. ARGUMENT 2 (1):59-74.
    This article deals with women-centred prose texts of the 1990s and 2000s in Russia written by women, and focuses especially on generation narratives. By this term the author means fictional texts that explore generational relations within families, from the perspective of repressed experiences, feelings and attitudes in the Soviet period. The selected texts are interpreted as narrating and conceptualizing the consequences of patriarchal ideology for relations between mothers and daughters and for reconstructing connections between Soviet and post-Soviet by revisiting and (...)
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  48. Sergeiy Sandler, Bakhtin on Poetry, Epic, and the Novel: Behind the Façade.
    Mikhail Bakhtin has gained a reputation of a thinker and literary theorist somehow hostile to poetry, and more specifically to the epic. This view is based on texts, in which Bakhtin creates and develops a conceptual contrast between poetry and the novel (in "Discourse in the Novel") or between epic and the novel (in "Epic and Novel"). However, as I will show, such perceptions of Bakhtin's position are grounded in a misunderstanding of Bakhtin's writing strategy and philosophical approach. Bakhtin often (...)
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  49. Lyman Tower Sargent (1975). A Note on the Other Side of Human Nature in the Utopian Novel. Political Theory 3 (1):88-97.
  50. Neela Bhattacharya Saxena (2012). Peopling an Unaccustomed Earth with a New Generation: Jhumpa Lahiri’s Supreme Fictional Journey Into Human Conditions. ARGUMENT 2 (1):129-150.
    Using a theoretical framework derived from my ongoing engagement with what I have called a ‘Gynocentric matrix’ of Indic sensibility, along with James Hillman’s polytheistic psychology and Wallace Stevens’ notion of a Supreme Fiction, this paper offers a reading of Jhumpa Lahiri’s (b. 1967) short stories beyond postcolonial criticism. Stemming from a depth consciousness where life, living and death, joy, indifference and sorrow, generation, de/re-generation, and transformation are intricately intertwined, Lahiri’s fictional multiverse, opposed to universe, is peopled by a new (...)
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