This category needs an editor. We encourage you to help if you are qualified.
Volunteer, or read more about what this involves.
Related categories
Siblings:
86 found
Search inside:
(import / add options)   Sort by:
1 — 50 / 86
  1. Derek Allan (2014). A Logical Redeemer: Kirillov in Dostoevsky’s 'Demons'. Journal of European Studies 44 (2).
    The engineer Kirillov, a major character in Dostoevsky's 'Demons', has provoked considerable critical disagreement. In 'The Myth of Sisyphus', Albert Camus argues that he expresses the theme of ‘logical suicide’ with ‘the most admirable range and depth’. Some recent commentators, however, have dismissed Kirillov as a madman in the grip of a mad theory. -/- While dissenting from Camus’s analysis in certain respects, this article offers an interpretation consistent with his basic argument. Kirillov’s suicide is based on a simple, if (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Derek Allan (2012). 'Les Liaisons Dangereuses' Through the Eyes of André Malraux. Journal of European Studies 42 (2):123-139.
    Choderlos de Laclos’s novel 'Les Liaisons dangereuses', first published in 1782, is regarded as one of the outstanding works of French literature. This article concerns a well known commentary by the twentieth-century writer André Malraux which, though often mentioned by critics, has seldom been studied in detail. The article argues that, while Malraux endorses the favourable modern assessments of 'Les Liaisons dangereuses', his analysis diverges in important respects from prevailing critical opinion. In particular, he regards the work as the commencement (...)
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Derek Allan (1995). An Inhuman Transcendence: Perken in Malraux's 'La Voie Royale’. Journal of European Studies 25:109-121.
    Examines an aspect of Malraux's exploration of action as a value.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Derek Allan (1988). André Malraux: The Commitment to Action in 'La Condition Humaine'. In Harold Bloom (ed.), André Malraux's Man's Fate. Chelsea House.
    Discusses the function of action in Malraux's third and most famous novel.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Derek Allan (1982). The Psychology of a Terrorist: Tchen in 'La Condition Humaine'. Nottingham French Studies 21 (1):48-66.
    Discusses the psychology of the terrorist Tchen in Malraux's 'Man's Fate'.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. José Luis Bermúdez & Sebastian Gardner (eds.) (2003). Art and Morality. Routledge.
    Art and Morality is a collection of groundbreaking new papers on the theme of aesthetics and ethics, and the link between the two subjects. A group of world-class contributors tackle the important question that arise when one thinks about the moral dimensions of art and the aesthetic dimension of moral life. The volume is a significant contribution to the philosophical literature, opening up unexplored questions and shedding new light on more traditional debates in aesthetics. The topics explored include the relation (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Bijoy H. Boruah (1988). Fiction and Emotion: A Study in Aesthetics and the Philosophy of Mind. Oxford University Press.
    Why do people respond emotionally to works of fiction they know are make-believe? Boruah tackles this question, which is fundamental aesthetics and literary studies, from a totally new perspective. Bringing together the various answers that have been offered by philosophers from Aristotle to Roger Scruton, he shows that while some philosophers have denied any rational basis to our emotional responses to fiction, others have argued that the emotions evoked by fiction are not real emotions at all. In response to this, (...)
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Stuart Brock (2007). Fictions, Feelings, and Emotions. Philosophical Studies 132 (2):211 - 242.
    Many philosophers suggest (1) that our emotional engagement with fiction involves participation in a game of make-believe, and (2) that what distinguishes an emotional game from a dispassionate game is the fact that the former activity alone involves sensations of physiological and visceral disturbances caused by our participation in the game. In this paper I argue that philosophers who accept (1) should reject (2). I then illustrate how this conclusion illuminates various puzzles in aesthetics and the philosophy of mind.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Christopher Butler (2004). Pleasure and the Arts: Enjoying Literature, Painting, and Music. Oxford University Press.
    How do the arts give us pleasure? Covering a very wide range of artistic works, from Auden to David Lynch, Rembrandt to Edward Weston, and Richard Strauss to Keith Jarrett, Pleasure and the Arts offers us an explanation of our enjoyable emotional engagements with literature, music, and painting. The arts direct us to intimate and particularized relationships, with the people represented in the works, or with those we imagine produced them. When we listen to music, look at a purely abstract (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Elisabeth Camp, Perspectives in Imaginative Engagement with Fiction.
    I take up three puzzles about our emotional and evaluative responses to fiction. First, how can we even have emotional responses to characters and events that we know not to exist, if emotions are as intimately connected to belief and action as they seem to be? One solution to this puzzle claims that we merely imagine having such emotional responses. But this raises the puzzle of why we would ever refuse to follow an author’s instructions to imagine such responses, since (...)
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. William Charlton (1986). Radford and Allen on Being Moved by Fiction: A Rejoinder. British Journal of Aesthetics 26 (4):391-394.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Florian Cova & Julien Deonna (2013). Being Moved. Philosophical Studies (3):1-20.
    In this paper, we argue that, barring a few important exceptions, the phenomenon we refer to using the expression “being moved” is a distinct type of emotion. In this paper’s first section, we motivate this hypothesis by reflecting on our linguistic use of this expression. In section two, pursuing a methodology that is both conceptual and empirical, we try to show that the phenomenon satisfies the five most commonly used criteria in philosophy and psychology for thinking that some affective episode (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Gregory Currie (1995). The Moral Psychology of Fiction. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 73 (2):250 – 259.
    What can we learn from fiction? I argue that we can learn about the consequences of a certain course of action by projecting ourselves, in imagination, into the situation of the fiction's characters.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. E. M. Dadlez (2009). Mirrors to One Another: Emotion and Value in Jane Austen and David Hume. Wiley-Blackwell.
    Illustrates how Hume and Austen complement one another, each providing a lens that allows us to expand and elaborate on the ideas of the other Proposes that ...
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. E. M. Dadlez (1996). Fiction, Emotion, and Rationality. British Journal of Aesthetics 36 (3):290-304.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. R. M. J. Dammann (1992). Emotion and Fiction. British Journal of Aesthetics 32 (1):13-20.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Susan Feagin (2010). Giving Emotions Their Due. British Journal of Aesthetics 50 (1):89-92.
    It is a widespread view that affective and emotional responses to many works of literature are often components of an appreciation of literature that is richer than it would be without them. In this paper, I raise three points designed to show that Lamarque does not give emotional and other affective responses their due. First, I propose that he does not sufficiently distinguish emotion and imagination from concerns about knowledge and truth. Second, he does not sufficiently distinguish appreciation, and the (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Susan L. Feagin (1997). Book Review: Reading with Feeling. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Literature 21 (1).
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Susan L. Feagin (1984). Some Pleasures of Imagination. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 43 (1):41-55.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Curtis Fogel (2008). Jenefer Robinson, Deeper Than Reason: Emotion and its Role in Literature, Music, and Art. [REVIEW] Minds and Machines 18 (2):289-292.
  21. Elisa Galgut (2009). Tragedy and Reparation. In Pedro Alexis Tabensky (ed.), The Positive Function of Evil. Palgrave Macmillan.
    The Kleinian psychoanalyst Hanna Segal argues for the reparative nature of art, and especially of the genre of classical tragedy. According to Kleinian theory, healthy psychological development requires that early infantile aggressive and destructive emotions are worked through; such “working through” is necessary for the development of conscience, for feelings of empathy, as well as for cognitive development. It is also a necessary condition for creative activity. Segal examines the roots of the impulse to create by looking specifically at the (...)
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Tamar Szabó Gendler, Genuine Rational Fictional Emotions.
    Regarding certain fictional characters (and situations) F, it is simultaneously true that: (1) We have genuine and rational emotional responses towards F (2) We believe that F is purely fictional At the same time, it is also true that: (3) In order for us to have genuine and rational emotional responses towards a character (or situation), we must not believe that the character (or situation) is purely fictional.
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Tamar Szabo Gendler (2006). Imaginative Resistance Revisited. In Shaun Nichols (ed.), The Architecture of the Imagination. Oxford University Press. 149-173.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Tamar Szabó Gendler (2000). The Puzzle of Imaginative Resistance. Journal of Philosophy 97 (2):55-81.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Rocco J. Gennaro (2000). Fiction, Pleasurable Tragedy, and the HOT Theory of Consciousness. Philosophical Papers 29 (2):107-20.
    [Final version in Philosophical Papers, 2000] Much has been made over the past few decades of two related problems in aesthetics. First, the "feeling fiction problem," as I will call it, asks: is it rational to be moved by what happens to fictional characters? How can we care about what happens to people who we know are not real?[i] Second, the so-called "paradox of tragedy" is embodied in the question: Why or how is it that we take pleasure in artworks (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Jonathan Gilmore (2014). That Obscure Object of Desire: Pleasure in Painful Art. In Jerrold Levinson (ed.), Suffering Art Gladly: The Paradox of Negative Emotions in Art. Palgrave/Macmillan.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Jonathan Gilmore (2013). Grief and Belief. British Journal of Aesthetics 53 (1):103-107.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Paul R. Goldin (2010). Eifring, Halvor, Ed., Love and Emotions in Traditional Chinese Literature. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 9 (2):237-240.
  29. Oswald Hanfling (1996). Fact, Fiction and Feeling. British Journal of Aesthetics 36 (4):356-366.
    I consider and reject two kinds of solution of the problem of feelings about fictional objects: that the relevant beliefs are not really different as between fiction and fact; and that the relevant feelings are not 'really the same'. The problem should be seen in the context of different phases in acquiring the relevant feeling-concepts and I distinguish three such phases. The first is necessarily 'presentational': the child is presented with suitable objects or pictures and responds with appropriate feelings, without (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. James Harold (2007). Review of Jenefer Robinson, Deeper Than Reason: Emotion and its Role in Literature, Music, and Art. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2007 (6).
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. James Harold (2005). Infected by Evil. Philosophical Explorations 8 (2):173 – 187.
    In this paper I argue that there is good reason to believe that we can be influenced by fictions in ways that matter morally, and some of the time we will be unaware that we have been so influenced. These arguments fall short of proving a clear causal link between fictions and specific changes in the audience, but they do reveal rather interesting and complex features of the moral psychology of fiction. In particular, they reveal that some Platonic worries about (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Glenn A. Hartz (1999). How We Can Be Moved by Anna Karenina, Green Slime, and a Red Pony. Philosophy 74 (4):557-578.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Gertrude Himmelfarb (2006). The Moral Imagination: From Edmund Burke to Lionel Trilling. Ivan R. Dee.
    Edmund Burke : apologist for Judaism? -- George Eliot : the wisdom of Dorothea -- Jane Austen : the education of Emma -- Charles Dickens : "a low writer" -- Benjamin Disraeli : the Tory imagination -- John Stuart Mill : the other Mill -- Walter Bagehot : "a divided nature" -- John Buchan : an untimely appreciation -- The Knoxes : a God-haunted family -- Michael Oakeshott : the conservative disposition -- Winston Churchill : "quite simply, a great man" (...)
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Susan James (2013). Fruitful Imagining: On Catherine Wilson's 'Grief and the Poet'. British Journal of Aesthetics 53 (1):97-101.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. R. Joyce (2000). Rational Fear of Monsters. British Journal of Aesthetics 40 (2):209-224.
    Colin Radford must weary of defending his thesis that the emotional reactions we have towards fictional characters, events, and states of affairs are irrational.1 Yet, for all the discussion, the issue has not, to my mind, been properly settled—or at least not settled in the manner I should prefer—and so this paper attempts once more to debunk Radford’s defiance of common sense. For some, the question of whether our emotional responses to fiction are rational does not arise, for they are (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Steven G. Kellman (1985). Loving Reading: Erotics of the Text. Archon Books.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Matthew Kieran & Dominic Lopes (eds.) (2003). Imagination, Philosophy, and the Arts. Routledge.
    Imagination is a central concept in aesthetics with close ties to issues in the philosophy of mind and the philosophy of language, yet it has not received the kind of sustained, critical attention it deserves. Imagination, Philosophy and the Arts represents the work of fifteen young yet distinguished philosophers of art, who critically examine just how and in what form the notion of imagination illuminates fundamental problems in the philosophy of art. All new papers, a strong collection on the imagination (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Peter Lamarque (1995). Tragedy and Moral Value. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 73 (2):239 – 249.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Peter Lamarque (1981). How Can We Fear and Pity Fictions? British Journal of Aesthetics 21 (4):291-304.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Joshua Landy (2010). Passion, Counter-Passion, Catharsis : Beckett and Flaubert on Feeling Nothing. In Garry Hagberg & Walter Jost (eds.), A Companion to the Philosophy of Literature. Wiley-Blackwell.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Jonathan Lear (2010). Catharsis. In Garry Hagberg & Walter Jost (eds.), A Companion to the Philosophy of Literature. Wiley-Blackwell.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Alice MacLachlan (2010). Mirrors to One Another: Emotions and Moral Value in Jane Austen and David Hume, E. M. Dadlez. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2010 (2).
  43. Christy Mag Uidhir (2011). An Eliminativist Theory of Suspense. Philosophy and Literature 35 (1):121-133.
    Motivating philosophical interest in the notion of suspense requires comparatively little appeal to what goes on in our ordinary work-a-day lives. After all, with respect to our everyday engagements with the actual world suspense appears to be largely absent—most of us seem to lead lives relatively suspense-free. The notion of suspense strikes us as interesting largely because of its significance with respect to our engagements with (largely fictional) narratives. So, when I indicate a preference for suspense novels, I indicate a (...)
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Derek Matravers (2003). Fictional Assent and the (so-Called) `Puzzle of Imaginative Resistance'. In Matthew Kieran & Dominic McIver Lopes (eds.), Imagination, Philosophy, and the Arts. Routledge. 91-106.
    This article criticises existing solutions to the 'puzzle of imaginative resistance', reconstrues it, and offers a solution of its own. About the Book : Imagination, Philosophy and the Arts is the first comprehensive collection of papers by philosophers examining the nature of imagination and its role in understanding and making art. Imagination is a central concept in aesthetics with close ties to issues in the philosophy of mind and the philosophy of language, yet it has not received the kind of (...)
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Derek Matravers (1998). Art and Emotion. Oxford University Press.
    Matravers examines how emotions form the bridge between our experience of art and of life. We often find that a particular poem, painting, or piece of music carries an emotional charge; and we may experience emotions toward, or on behalf of, a particular fictional character. Matravers shows that what these experiences have in common, and what links them to the expression of emotion in non-artistic cases, is the role played by feeling. He carries out a critical survey of various accounts (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Aaron Meskin & Jonathan M. Weinberg (2003). Emotions, Fiction, and Cognitive Architecture. British Journal of Aesthetics 43 (1):18-34.
    Recent theorists suggest that our capacity to respond affectively to fictions depends on our ability to engage in simulation: either simulating a character in the fiction, or simulating someone reading or watching the fiction as though it were fact. We argue that such accounts are quite successful at accounting for many of the basic explananda of our affective engagements in fiction. Nonetheless, we argue further that simulationist accounts ultimately fail, for simulation involves an ineliminably ego-centred element that is atypical of (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Mary Mothersill (2006). Make-Believe Morality and Fictional Worlds. In José Luis Bermúdez & Sebastian Gardner (eds.), Arts and Morality. Routledge. 74-94.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Daniéle Moyal-Sharrock (2009). The Fiction of Paradox: Really Feeling for Anna Karenina. In Ylva Gustafsson, Camilla Kronqvist & Michael McEachrane (eds.), Emotions and Understanding: Wittgensteinian Perspectives. Palgrave Macmillan.
    How is it that we can be moved by what we know does not exist? In this paper, I examine the so-called 'paradox of fiction', showing that it fatally hinges on cognitive theories of emotion such as Kendall Walton's pretend theory and Peter Lamarque's thought theory. I reject these theories and acknowledge the concept-formative role of genuine emotion generated by fiction. I then argue, contra Jenefer Robinson, that this 'éducation sentimentale' is not achieved through distancing, but rather through the engagement (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Amy Mullin (2004). Moral Defects, Aesthetic Defects, and the Imagination. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 62 (3):249–261.
  50. Hichem Naar (2013). Art and Emotion. Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    A survey of some of the major issues surrounding our emotional responses to artworks. Topics discussed include the paradox of fiction, the paradox of tragedy, and the nature of emotion in response to music.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 86