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  1. Review author[S.]: J. Agassi (1970). Philosophy as Literature: The Case of Borges. Mind 79 (314):287-294.
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  2. Jesús Aguilar (2010). Philosophy and Latin American Literature. In Susana Nuccetelli, Ofelia Schutte & Otávio Bueno (eds.), A Companion to Latin American Philosophy. Wiley-Blackwell
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  3. Timo Airaksinen (1995). The Philosophy of the Marquis De Sade. Routledge.
    The Marquis de Sade's books have been censored in many countries. He is notorious for his forbidden novels like The 120 Days of Sodom and Justine, Juliette . The Marquis de Sade has long been considered the archetypal pornographer. The Philosophy of the Marquis de Sade challenges these traditional interpretations by reading de Sade and his books philosophically. Airaksinen examines de Sade's claim that in order to be truly happy and free we must perform evil acts. The Sadeian hero leads (...)
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  4. Ernest Albee (1909). The Meaning of Literature for Philosophy. International Journal of Ethics 20 (1):1-10.
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  5. Alexey Aliyev (forthcoming). What Instances of Novels Are. Philosophia:1-21.
    The consensus is that novels can be fully appreciated only through an experiential engagement with their well-formed instances. But what are the entities that serve as such instances? According to the orthodox view, these entities are primarily inscriptions—concrete texts written or printed on something or displayed on the screen of some electronic device. In this paper, I argue that this view is misguided, since well-formed instances of a novel must manifest certain sonic properties, but such properties cannot be manifested by (...)
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  6. Emmanuel Alloa & Muriel Pic (2012). Lisibilité / Lesbarkeit. MSH Paris - Trivium. Revue Franco-Allemande de Sciences Humaines Et Sociales.
    Seit über 30 Jahren gibt es in den deutschen wie französischen Kultur- und Geisteswissenschaften das Bestreben, den Begriff der »Lesbarkeit« von seiner engen Bindung an den geschriebenen Text zu emanzipieren. Die vorliegende Ausgabe von Trivium lässt einige der maßgeblichen Stimmen in dieser Debatte zu Wort kommen. Auf der gemeinsamen Schnittfläche von Mikrohistorie, Semiologie, Psychoanalyse, Kulturgeschichte, Physiognomie und Mantik zeichnet sich ein neues und zugleich altes Verständnis des Lesens ab. Wenn sich in der Moderne die Frage nach dem Lesen von Spuren (...)
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  7. Maria Antonaccio (2000). Picturing the Human: The Moral Thought of Iris Murdoch. Oxford University Press.
    Iris Murdoch has long been known as one of the most deeply insightful and morally passionate novelists of our time. This attention has often eclipsed Murdoch's sophisticated and influential work as a philosopher, which has had a wide-ranging impact on thinkers in moral philosophy as well as religious ethics and political theory. Yet it has never been the subject of a book-length study in its own right. Picturing the Human seeks to fill this gap. In this groundbreaking book, author Maria (...)
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  8. Antony Aumann (2013). Kierkegaard, Paraphrase, and the Unity of Form and Content. Philosophy Today 57 (4):376-387.
    On one standard view, paraphrasing Kierkegaard requires no special literary talent. It demands no particular flair for the poetic. However, Kierkegaard himself rejects this view. He says we cannot paraphrase in a straightforward fashion some of the ideas he expresses in a literary format. To use the words of Johannes Climacus, these ideas defy direct communication. In this paper, I piece together and defend the justification Kierkegaard offers for this position. I trace its origins to concerns raised by Lessing and (...)
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  9. Christopher Bartel (2012). The Puzzle of Historical Criticism. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 70 (2):213-222.
    Works of fiction are often criticized for their historical inaccuracies. But this practice poses a problem: why would we criticize a work of fiction for its historical inaccuracy given that it is a work of fiction? There is an intuition that historical inaccuracies in works of fiction diminish their value as works of fiction; and yet, given that they are works of fiction, there is also an intuition that such works should be free from the constraints of historical truth. The (...)
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  10. Harrison Bernard (1994). Symposium: Truth, Meaning and Literature. British Journal of Aesthetics 34 (4):376-381.
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  11. Ben Blumson (2015). Fact, Fiction, and Fantasy. Midwest Studies in Philosophy 39 (1):46-57.
    This paper argues: (1) All knowledge from fiction is from imagination (2) All knowledge from imagination is modal knowledge (3) So, all knowledge from fiction is modal knowledge Moreover, some knowledge is from fiction, so (1)-(3) are non-vacuously true.
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  12. Gerald Bruns (2002). Review of Jorge J.E. Gracia, Carolyn Korsmeyer (Eds.), Literary Philosophers: Borges, Calvino, Eco. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2002 (10).
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  13. Axel Bühler (2015). Interpretation als Erkenntnis. In Jan Borkowski, Stefan Descher, Felicitas Ferder & Philipp David Heine (eds.), Literatur interpretieren: Interdisziplinäre Beiträge zur Theorie und Praxis. Mentis 173-189.
    Welche Anforderungen können an Interpretationen gestellt werden, wenn sie Erkenntnisse vermitteln sollen? In diesem Aufsatz führe ich sieben solcher Anforderungen auf und erläutere sie knapp: (1) Eine Interpretation soll mit dem Anspruch auf empirische Erkenntnis verbunden sein. (2) Sie befasst sich mit einem historischen Einzelfall. (3) Sie erklärt die Beschaffenheit von Texten psychologisch mit Absichten und Überzeugungen. (4) Diese Absichten und Überzeugungen haben Inhalte, sind über etwas. (5) Interpretationen sind im Sinne des Metaphysischen Realismus aufzufassen. (6) Die Tätigkeit der Texthervorbringung (...)
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  14. Mikel Burley (2012). D. Z. Phillips' Contemplations on Religion and Literature. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 71 (1):21-37.
    This paper critically discusses D. Z. Phillips’ use of literary works as a resource for philosophical reflection on religion. Beginning by noting Phillips’ suggestion, made in relation to Waiting for Godot , that the possibilities of meaning that we see in a literary work can reveal something of our own religious sensibility, I then proceed to show what we learn about Phillips from his readings of certain works by Larkin, Tennyson, and Wharton. Through exploring alternative possible readings, I argue that, (...)
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  15. Anthony J. Cascardi (2000). Two Kinds of Knowing in Plato, Cervantes, and Aristotle. Philosophy and Literature 24 (2):406-423.
    This essay argues that Cervantes engages and responds to the Platonic critique of mimesis through a tradition that is rooted in Aristotle's _Nicomachean Ethics. Especially in _Don Quixote, the standard by which mimesis is judged in Platonic terms is replaced by notions of the fitting, the just, and the appropriate, which draw on Aristotelian notions of practical reasoning. These had been promulgated by Renaissance rhetoricians and in proverbial discourse. Cervantes finds these traditions particularly well-suited to discourse in the novel, which (...)
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  16. Stephen R. L. Clark (1995). How to Live Forever: Science Fiction and Philosophy. Routledge.
    Immortality has long preoccupied everyone from alchemists to science fiction writers. In this intriguing investigation, Stephen Clark contends that the genre of science fiction writing enables the investigation of philosophical questions about immortality without the constraints of academic philosophy. He shows how fantasy accounts of phenomena such as resurrection, outer body experience, reincarnation or life extending medicines can be related to philosophy in interesting ways. Reading Western myths such as that of vampire, he examines the ways fear and hopes of (...)
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  17. Oliver Conolly & Bashar Haydar (2007). Literature, Knowledge, and Value. Philosophy and Literature 31 (1):111-124.
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  18. S. G. Couvalis (1988). Feyerabend, Ionesco, and the Philosophy of the Drama. Critical Philosophy 4:51-66.
  19. Gregory Currie (2012). Literature and Truthfulness. In James Maclaurin (ed.), Rationis Defensor. 23-31.
    How should we characterise the view that we can learn about the mind from literature? Should we say that such learning consists in acquiring knowledge of truths? That option is more attractive than it is sometimes made to seem by those who oppose propositional knowledge to practical knowledge or “knowing how”. But some writers on this topic—Lamarque and Olsen—argue that, while literature may express interesting propositions, it is not their truth that matters, but their “content”. Matters to what? To literary (...)
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  20. Jürgen Daiber, Eva-Maria Konrad, Thomas Petraschka & Hans Rott (eds.) (2012). Understanding Fiction: Knowledge and Meaning in Literature. Mentis.
    The book addresses the questions how literature can convey knowledge and how literary meaning can arise in the face of the fact that fictional texts waive the usual claim to truth. Based on the interdisciplinary cooperation of literary scholars and analytic philosophers, the present anthology attempts a) to analyze the possibility and conditions of gaining knowledge through literature, and b) to apply, in a fruitful way, philosophical theories of meaning and interpretation to the constitution of meaning within the language of (...)
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  21. Edward A. Davenport (1983). Literature as Thought Experiment (on Aiding and Abetting the Muse. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 13 (3):279-306.
  22. Miguel de Beistegui & Simon Sparks (eds.) (2000). Philosophy and Tragedy. Routledge.
    Philosophy and Tragedy is a compelling contribution to that oversight and the first book to address the topic in a major way. Eleven new essays by internationally renowned philosophers clearly show how time and again, major thinkers have returned to tragedy in many of their key works. Philosophy and Tragedy asks why it is that thinkers as far apart as Hegel and Benjamin should make tragedy such and important strand of philosophy should present itself tragically. From Heidegger's reading of Sophocles' (...)
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  23. A. E. Denham (2015). Celan's Song: Pictures, Poetry and Epistemic Value. In John Gibson (ed.), Philosophy & Poetry. Oxford University Press
  24. Marjolaine Deschênes (2013). Penser la création littéraire avec Paul Ricœur. Fabula/Les Colloques.
    Philosophie de la vivification et de la fragilité, l’œuvre de Paul Ricœur est fertile pour qui veut penser la création littéraire. Cette pratique d’écriture, Ricœur l’envisage comme un procès complexe où l’écrivain s’individualise et s’altère d’un seul geste. Nous le verrons, l’écriture est à ses yeux distanciation, geste d’appropriation médiatisé. Cet écartèlement entre le propre et l’impropre fait la spécificité de l’écriture littéraire, où s’entrelacent la rationalité et l’irrationalité, le savoir et le non-savoir. Après avoir exposé ces vues, je les (...)
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  25. Paul Deussen (1906). The Philosophy of the Upanishads. New York, Dover Publications.
    In this work-originally published in German in 1906 and translated into English two years later-Deussen explores the place of the Upanishads in the literature ...
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  26. E. Di Bona (2015). Narrative and Essayistic Temporalities. In Ch Wampole S. Ercolino (ed.), Narration and Reflection, Special Issue of Compar(a)ison: An International Journal of Comparative Literature. Peter Lang 49-62.
    The issues of this essay concern whether there are ways of experiencing time that are specific to narration and whether such ways can also be applied to the experience of time in reflection. In order to tackle these issues, we shall compare and contrast the experience of time in life with both the temporal experiences of narration and the temporal experiences of reflection. We shall begin, then, with a discussion on what the “experience of time” is, in the attempt of (...)
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  27. Eduardo Dib (2015). No en la escritura. Eldedodeicida.
    El Libro de Arena, de J. L. Borges imagina un libro poblado de infinitas páginas. Esta infinidad se manifiesta de varias formas, cada una de las cuales puede ser asimilada con alguna propiedad de los conjuntos numéricos. Exploraremos dicha similitud y veremos emerger el Libro de Arena como un símbolo complejo, pero no autónomo. En efecto, no sólo el libro y sus páginas, sino asimismo los personajes y cada elemento puesto en escena se articulan en el desarrollo del relato y (...)
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  28. Andreas Dorschel (2015). Passions of the Intellect: A Study of Polemics. Philosophy 90 (4):679-684.
    Polemics are a sort of critique typically suffused with inimical emotions and passions. But how are these emotions and passions to be construed? Neither authorial expression nor actual arousal properly account for their rôle in polemics. Rather, the polemicist must stage an unequal battle between a polemical self and the polemical target vis-à-vis an anticipated audience, skilfully handling, through his words, the emotions ascribed to each of them.
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  29. Andreas Dorschel (2013). Denktagebücher: Zur Poetik des philosophischen Journals. Philosophische Rundschau 60 (4):264-298.
    In philosophers’ diaries the individuality of men and women, their daily pain and pleasure, uniquely meets, and sometimes clashes, with the universal, or at least general, claims bound up with their metier. Following the genre’s history from the later 18th century to the present, Andreas Dorschel distinguishes (by way of ideal types) between (a) experimental diaries, (b) methodical diaries, (c) representative diaries, and (d) intimate diaries.
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  30. Andreas Dorschel (2011). Prosa der Aufmerksamkeit. In Jürgen Hosemann (ed.), Die Zeit, das Schweigen und die Toten. Fischer Taschenbuch Verlag 258-261.
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  31. Paul Dumouchel (1989). Literary Knowledge, Humanistic Inquiry and the Philosophy of Science Livingston Paisley Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 1988. Pp. Ix, 276. Dialogue 28 (2):346.
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  32. Mary Eagleton (2003). Literature. In A Concise Companion to Feminist Theory. Blackwell
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  33. David Egan (2016). HARRISON, BERNARD What Is Fiction For? Literary Humanism Restored. Indiana University Press, 2015, Xxvi + 593 Pp., $85.00 Cloth, $35.00 Paper. [REVIEW] Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 74 (2):212-215.
  34. David Egan (2016). Literature and Thought Experiments. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 74 (2):139-150.
    Like works of literature, thought experiments present fictional narratives that prompt reflection in their readers. Because of these and other similarities, a number of philosophers have argued for a strong analogy between works of literary fiction and thought experiments, some going so far as to say that works of literary fiction are a species of thought experiment. These arguments are often used in defending a cognitivist position with regard to literature: thought experiments produce knowledge, so works of literary fiction can (...)
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  35. Richard Thomas Eldridge (ed.) (1996). Beyond Representation: Philosophy and Poetic Imagination. Cambridge University Press.
    The essays in this volume explore the ways in which traditional philosophical problems about self-knowledge, self-identity, and value have migrated into literature since the Romantic and Idealist periods. How do so-called literary works take up these problems in a new way? What conception of the subject is involved in this literary practice? How are the lines of demarcation between philosophy and literature problematised? The contributors examine these issues with reference both to Romantic and Idealist writers and to some of their (...)
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  36. Colin Falck (1996). Book Review: Myth, Truth and Literature: Towards a True Post- Modernism. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Literature 20 (1).
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  37. Frank B. Farrell (2008). Review of John Gibson, Fiction and the Weave of Life. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2008 (10).
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  38. C. Fox & M. Green (2011). Narratives and Narrators: A Philosophy of Stories * by Gregory Currie. Analysis 71 (4):800-802.
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  39. William Franke (2009). Dante's Inferno as Poetic Revelation of Prophetic Truth. Philosophy and Literature 33 (2):pp. 252-266.
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  40. William Franke (2008). Equivocations of “Metaphysics”. Philosophy and Theology 20 (1/2):29-52.
    Western intellectual tradition is brought to focus through the lens of Dante’s Comedia around the idea of the identity of being and intellect. All reality is dependent on God as pure Being, pure actuality of self-awareness (“thought thinking itself ”); everything else is or,equivalently, has form by its participation in this Being which is Intellect. The human soul can experience itself as divine by realizing this identity of Being with Intellect through its own being refined to pure intellect and form. (...)
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  41. Henry Dyer] Fruit (1938). Line Index to the Philosophy of William Shakespeare. [Washington, Planoprinted by the Washington Planograph Co., Inc..
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  42. Robert S. Gall (2003). Interrupting Speculation: The Thinking of Heidegger and Greek Tragedy. [REVIEW] Continental Philosophy Review 36 (2):177-194.
    Despite his extended readings of parts of the Antigone of Sophocles, Heidegger nowhere explicitly sets about giving us a theory of tragedy or a detailed analysis of the essence of tragedy. The following paper seeks to piece together Heidegger's understanding of tragedy and tragic experience by looking to themes in his thinking – particularly his analyses of early Greek thinking – and connecting them both to his scattered references to tragedy and actual examples from Greek tragedy. What we find is (...)
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  43. Richard Gaskin (1995). Truth, Fiction and Literature. British Journal of Aesthetics 35 (4):395-401.
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  44. Richard Gaskin (1994). Symposium: Truth, Meaning and Literature. British Journal of Aesthetics 34 (4):382-388.
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  45. John Gibson (2013). Representation and the Novel. The Henry James Review 34 (3):220-231.
  46. John Gibson (2013). What Do Humanists Want? In P. Hanna (ed.), Reality and Culture: Essays on the Philosophy of Bernard Harrison. Rodopi
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  47. John Gibson (2008). Cognitivism and the Arts. Philosophy Compass 3 (4):573-589.
    Cognitivism in respect to the arts refers to a constellation of positions that share in common the idea that artworks often bear, in addition to aesthetic value, a significant kind of cognitive value. In this paper I concentrate on three things: (i) the challenge of understanding exactly what one must do if one wishes to defend a cognitivist view of the arts; (ii) common anti-cognitivist arguments; and (iii) promising recent attempts to defend cognitivism.
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  48. John Gibson (2007). Fiction and the Weave of Life. Oxford University Press.
    Printbegrænsninger: Der kan printes 1 kapitel eller op til 5% af teksten.
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  49. John Gibson (2003). Between Truth and Triviality. British Journal of Aesthetics 43 (3):224-237.
    A viable theory of literary humanism must do justice to the idea that literature offers cognitive rewards to the careful reader. There are, however, powerful arguments to the effect that literature is at best only capable of offering idle visions of a world already well known. In this essay I argue that there is a form of cognitive awareness left unmentioned in the traditional vocabulary of knowledge acquisition, a form of awareness literature is particularly capable of offering. Thus even if (...)
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  50. John Gibson, Wolfgang Huemer & Luca Pocci (eds.) (2007). A Sense of the World: Essays on Fiction, Narrative, and Knowledge. Routledge.
    A team of leading contributors from both philosophical and literary backgrounds have been brought together in this impressive book to examine how works of literary fiction can be a source of knowledge. Together, they analyze the important trends in this current popular debate. The innovative feature of this volume is that it mixes work by literary theorists and scholars with work of analytic philosophers that combined together provide a comprehensive statement of the variety of ways in which works of fiction (...)
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