This category needs an editor. We encourage you to help if you are qualified.
Volunteer, or read more about what this involves.
Related categories
Siblings:
260 found
Search inside:
(import / add options)   Sort by:
1 — 50 / 260
  1. Alison Ainley (1997). Luce Irigaray: At Home with Martin Heidegger? Angelaki 2 (1):139 – 145.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Linda Martín Alcoff (2013). Luce Irigaray Cluster—Editor's Introduction. Hypatia 28 (3):417-418.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Dr Martin Alison (forthcoming). A European Initiative: Irigaray, Marx, and Citizenship. Hypatia 19 (3):20-37.
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Pamela Sue Anderson (2007). Feminist Challenges to Conceptions of God: Exploring Divine Ideals. Philosophia 35 (3-4):361-370.
    This paper presents a feminist intervention into debates concerning the relation between human subjects and a divine ideal. I turn to what Irigarayan feminists challenge as a masculine conception of ‘the God’s eye view’ of reality. This ideal functions not only in philosophy of religion, but in ethics, politics, epistemology and philosophy of science: it is given various names from ‘the competent judge’ to the ‘the ideal observer’ (IO) whose view is either from nowhere or everywhere. The question is whether, (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Pamela Sue Anderson (2006). Life, Death and (Inter)Subjectivity: Realism and Recognition in Continental Feminism. [REVIEW] International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 60 (1/3):41 - 59.
    I begin with the assumption that a philosophically significant tension exists today in feminist philosophy of religion between those subjects who seek to become divine and those who seek their identity in mutual recognition. My critical engagement with the ambiguous assertions of Luce Irigaray seeks to demonstrate, on the one hand, that a woman needs to recognize her own identity but, on the other hand, that each subject whether male or female must struggle in relation to the other in order (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Ovidiu Anemtoaicei & Yvette Russell (2013). Luce Irigaray: Back to the Beginning. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 21 (5):773-786.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Diane Antonio (2001). The Flesh of All That Is: Merleau-Ponty, Irigaray, and Julian's 'Showings'. Sophia 40 (2):47-65.
    Julian of Norwich (b. 1342) anticipated the ontological and epistemological work on sexed embodiment pioneered in the work of Merleau-Ponty and Irigaray in the 20th century. Her epistemology of sensual ‘showings’ helped reconfigure women’s embodiment and speech acts (‘bodytalk’): by recognizing cognitive emotions and the knowledge-producing body; and by envisioning the intertwining of human flesh with All That Is. The paper next examines Merleau-Ponty’s somatic discourse on the chiasmic flesh, which leads to a discussion of Irigaray’s work on poetic mimesis.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Ellen T. Armour (1997). Questions of Proximity: “Woman's Place” in Derrick and Irigaray. Hypatia 12 (1):63-78.
    This article reconsiders the issue of Luce Irigaray's proximity to Jacques Derrida on the question of woman. I use Derrida's reading of Nietzsche in Spurs: Nietzsche's Styles (1979) and Irigaray's reading of Heidegger in L'Oubli de l'air (1983) to argue that reading them as supplements to one another is more accurate and more productive for feminism than separating one from the other. I conclude by laying out the benefits for feminism that such a reading would offer.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Athena Athanasiou & Elena Tzelepis (2010). Mourning (as) Woman: Event, Catachresis, and "That Other Face of Discourse": Poiesis of Alterity. In Elena Tzelepis & Athena Athanasiou (eds.), Rewriting Difference: Luce Irigaray and "the Greeks". State University of New York Press.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Athena Athanasiou & Elena Tzelepis (2010). Thinking Difference as Different Thinking in Luce Irigaray's Deconstructive Genealogies. In Elena Tzelepis & Athena Athanasiou (eds.), Rewriting Difference: Luce Irigaray and "the Greeks". State University of New York Press.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Claudia Baracchi (2005). Elemental Translations: From Friedrich Nietzsche and Luce Irigaray. Research in Phenomenology 35 (1):219-248.
    This essay considers the tensions informing Nietzsche's reflection on intertwined issues of nature, art, sexuality, and the feminine. Through the figure of Dionysus, Nietzsche articulates a suggestive understanding of generation as the upsurge of nature in its transformative movement. The juxtaposition of Luce Irigaray's elaboration of the Dionysian calls for an interrogation of Nietzsche's work regarding (1) the sublimation of nature into art and of sexuality or sensuality into artistic drives, (2) the oblivion of sexual difference in the coupling of (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Christine Battersby (1996). Her Blood and His Mirror: Mary Coleridge, Luce Irigaray, and the Female Self. In Richard Thomas Eldridge (ed.), Beyond Representation: Philosophy and Poetic Imagination. Cambridge University Press. 249--272.
  13. Tahseen Béa (2010). For Love of the Other. International Studies in Philosophy Monograph Series:83-204.
    No memory can follow the traces of the past. It is an immemorial past—and this also is perhaps eternity, whose signifyingness obstinately throws one back to the past. Eternity is the very irreversibility of time, the source and refuge of the past. (Levinas, “Meaning and Sense,” 30)Keeping the senses alert means being attentive in flesh and in spirit. (Irigaray, Ethics of Sexual Difference, 148).
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Tahseen Béa (2008). Memory of Touch. International Studies in Philosophy Monograph Series:5-82.
    Is the memory of touching always disguised by senses that forget where they come from? Creating distancethrough a mastery that constitutes the object as a monument built in place of the subject’s disappearance.The memory of touching? The most insistent and the most difficult to enter into memory. The one that entailsreturning to a commitment whose beginning and end cannot be recovered.Memory of the flesh, where that which has not yet been written is inscribed, laid down? That which has a place,has (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Anne-Emmanuelle Berger (2010). Textiles That Matter: Irigaray and Veils: Dissimulated Genealogies, Ambiguous Antigones. In Elena Tzelepis & Athena Athanasiou (eds.), Rewriting Difference: Luce Irigaray and "the Greeks". State University of New York Press.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Anne-Emmanuelle Berger (1998). The Newly Veiled Woman: Irigaray, Specularity, and the Islamic Veil. Diacritics 28 (1):93-119.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Philippa Berry (1992). Woman and Space According to Kristeva and Irigaray. In Philippa Berry & Andrew Wernick (eds.), Shadow of Spirit: Postmodernism and Religion. Routledge. 250--64.
  18. Emanuela Bianchi (2012). Rewriting Difference: Irigaray and “The Greeks”. Edited by Elena Tzelepis and Athena Athanasiou. Albany: State University of New York Press, 2010. [REVIEW] Hypatia 27 (2):455-460.
  19. Emanuela Bianchi (2010). Sexual Topologies in the Aristotelian Cosmos: Revisiting Irigaray's Physics of Sexual Difference. Continental Philosophy Review 43 (3):373-389.
    Irigaray’s engagement with Aristotelian physics provides a specific diagnosis of women’s ontological and ethical situation under Western metaphysics: Women provide place and containership to men, but have no place of their own, rendering them uncontained and abyssal. She calls for a reconfiguration of this topological imaginary as a precondition for an ethics of sexual difference. This paper returns to Aristotelian cosmological texts to further investigate the topologies of sexual difference suggested there. In an analysis both psychoanalytic and phenomenological, the paper (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Jenifer Booth (2013). Towards a Pre-Modern Psychaitry. Palgrave Macmillan.
    Responding to the work of previous critics of psychiatry, who have associated its undue dominance with both a modern scientific paradigm and political factors, I put forward a theoretical challenge based on MacIntyre`s work on Aquinas and Aristotle, but adding the museum and assembly as conceptual thinking tools. -/- MacIntyre`s work on practices, tradition-constituted enquiry, Marxist ideology and Kuhn are all used in putting forward a pre-modern view of knowledge. The feminist philosophy of Luce Irigaray widens the project to include (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Amalia Boyer (2011). Irigaray and the question on sexual difference. [Spanish]. Eidos 2:90-103.
    Normal 0 21 false false false ES X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Tabla normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} For Luce Irigaray the central question of our age is that of sexual difference. This article attempts to shed light on the reasons for this question through the analysis of the critiques of psychoanalysis and philosophy undertook (...)
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Amalia Boyer (2004). Irigaray y la cuestión de la diferencia sexual. Eidos: Revista de Filosofía de la Universidad Del Norte 2:91-105.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Michael Bray (1999). Vasseleu, Cathryn. Textures of Light: Vision and Touch in Irigaray, Levinas and Merleau-Ponty. Review of Metaphysics 53 (1):204-205.
  24. Claudia Bruno (2013). Between Goddesses and Cyborgs: Towards a Shared Desire for Sustainability. In Lenart Škof (ed.), Breathing with Luce Irigaray. Bloomsbury. 101.
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Iean Marie Byrne (2013). Breath of Awakening: Nonduality, Breathing and Sexual Difference. In Lenart Škof (ed.), Breathing with Luce Irigaray. Bloomsbury.
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Isabel G. Gamero Cabrera (2012). Los efectos de la dominación simbólica en el feminismo. Astrolabio: Revista Internacional de Filosofía 13:189-200.
    En este artículo quisiera aludir a las tesis de Bourdieu sobre la dominación simbólica, incidiendo en su faceta androcéntrica; para, a continuación contemplar cómo, debido al carácter incorporado de dicha estructura (esto es, a que su eficacia radica en que el dominado contribuye a su propia dominación), algunas teorías y prácticas feministas, como el feminismo de la diferencia de Luce Irigaray, los planteamientos éticos y políticos de Benhabib y la subversión de la identidad que promueve Butler, pueden llegar a reproducir (...)
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Anne Caldwell (2002). Transforming Sacrifice: Irigaray and the Politics of Sexual Difference. Hypatia 17 (4):16-39.
    : This essay examines Irigaray's analysis of politics and the political implications of her critique of sacrificial orders that repress difference/matter. I suggest that her descriptions of a fluid "feminine" can be read as an alternative symbolic not dependent on repression. This idea is politically promising in opening a possibility for justice and a nonantagonistic intersubjectivity. I conclude by assessing Irigaray's concrete proposals for sexuate rights and a civil identity for women.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (10 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Jan Campbell (1997). Mediations of the Female Imaginary and Symbolic. History of the Human Sciences 10 (2):41-60.
    Many critics view Irigaray's work as an extension or deconstruction of a Lacanian paradigm. Few actually analyse it as a direct challenge to Lacanian concepts of symbolic subjectivity, and the consequent, alternative framework this would envisage. This article discusses a poss ible beyond the phallus, in relation to mediating concepts of the female imaginary and symbolic within her work, and an understanding of the female imaginary and symbolic within different feminist interpretations of the maternal imaginary and symbolic, arguing that the (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Suzanne Laba Cataldi (2004). The Philosopher and Her Shadow Irigaray's Reading of Merleau-Ponty. Philosophy Today 48 (4):343-354.
  30. Marguerite La Caze (2005). Love, That Indispensable Supplement: Irigaray and Kant on Love and Respect. Hypatia 20 (3):92-114.
    Is love essential to ethical life, or merely a supplement? In Kant's view, respect and love, as duties, are in tension with each other because love involves drawing closer and respect involves drawing away. By contrast, Irigaray says that love and respect do not conflict because love as passion must also involve distancing and we have a responsibility to love. I argue that love, understood as passion and based on respect, is essential to ethics.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (10 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Marguerite La Caze (2002). The Encounter Between Wonder and Generosity. Hypatia 17 (3):1 - 19.
    In a reading of René Descartes's The Passions of the Soul, Luce Irigaray explores the possibility that wonder, first of all passions, can provide the basis for an ethics of sexual difference because it is prior to judgment, and thus nonhierarchical. For Descartes, the passion of generosity gives the key to ethics. I argue that wonder should be extended to other differences and should be combined with generosity to form the basis of an ethics.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Tina Chanter (2010). Irigaray's Challenge to the Fetishistic Hegemony of the Platonic One and Many. In Elena Tzelepis & Athena Athanasiou (eds.), Rewriting Difference: Luce Irigaray and "the Greeks". State University of New York Press.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Tina Chanter (1995). Ethics of Eros: Irigaray's Re-Writing of the Philosophers. Routledge.
    Ethics of Eros sheds light on contemporary feminist discourse by bringing into question some of the basic distinctions and categories that orchestrate it. The work of Luce Irigaray serves as a focus for interrogating the opposition between "French" and "Anglo-American" feminism as articulated in the debate over essentialism. Tina Chanter defends Irigaray against charges of essentialism by showing that such criticisms fail to consider the theoretical background of her work. Chanter demonstrates that Irigaray inherited and attempted to move beyond the (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Tina Chanter, Antigone's Exemplarity: Irigaray, Hegel, and Excluded Grounds as Constitutive of Feminist Theory In: Rawlinson, Mary C. , Hom, Sabrina L. And Khader, Serene J., (Eds.) Thinking with Irigaray. Albany, U.S. : State University of New York Press, 2011, Pp. 265-292. ISBN 9781438439174.
    Irigaray raises the question of sexual difference. Yet there are moments at which Irigaray’s own pursuit of this question recapitulates the kind of universalism it is meant to combat. She remains ensconced in judgments that close down the attempt to think beyond sexual difference. The article pursues this line of thought particularly in relation to her figuring of Antigone, suggesting that there is a need to open up sexual difference so that it does not function as a universal discourse, but (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Sue Chaplin (2001). How the Sublime Comes to Matter in Eighteenth Century Legal Discourse – an Irigarayan Critique of Hobbes, Locke and Burke. Feminist Legal Studies 9 (3):199-220.
    This article examines the way in which the sublime comes to matter within various eighteenth century legal discourses, particularly in the work of Thomas Hobbes, John Locke and Edmund Burke. The essay seeks also to relate the theoretical works of these philosophers and lawyers to practical legislative developments of the period, in particular, the passage of the Black Act in1726 and the Marriage Act in 1753. The sublime comes to matter to the law in this period in the sense that (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Dianne Chisholm (2010). In the Underworld with Irigaray: Kathy Acker's Eurydice. In Elena Tzelepis & Athena Athanasiou (eds.), Rewriting Difference: Luce Irigaray and "the Greeks". State University of New York Press.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Maria Cimitile (2001). The Horror of Language: Irigaray and Heidegger. Philosophy Today 45 (9999):66-74.
  38. Christopher Cohoon (2011). Coming Together: The Six Modes of Irigarayan Eros. Hypatia 26 (3):478-496.
    Luce Irigaray's provocative vision of eros is often expressed in what Elizabeth Grosz calls “rambling and apparently disconnected” language, and nowhere in Irigaray's texts is it presented as a coherent account. With the goal of elaborating the significance of Irigaray's vision, I here set out to construct such an account. After first defining the Irigarayan erotic encounter as a paradoxical conjunction of “separation and alliance,” I then aim to show that its structure may be productively interpreted in terms of six (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Claire Colebrook (2010). Dynamic Potentiality: The Body That Stands Alone. In Elena Tzelepis & Athena Athanasiou (eds.), Rewriting Difference: Luce Irigaray and "the Greeks". State University of New York Press.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Claire Colebrook (1997). Feminist Philosophy and the Philosophy of Feminism: Irigaray and the History of Western Metaphysics. Hypatia 12 (1):79 - 98.
  41. Verena Andermatt Conley (1997). Ecopolitics: The Environment in Poststructuralist Thought. Routledge.
    Ecopolitics is a study of environmental awareness--or non-awareness--in contemporary French theory. Arguing that it is now impossible not to think in an ecological way, Verena Andermatt Conley traces the roots of today's concern for the environment back to the intellectual climate of the late '50s and '60s. Major thinkers of 1968, the author argues, changed the way we think the world; this owes much to an ecological awareness that remains at the heart of issues concerning cultural theory in general. The (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Agnes B. Curry (2006). The Logos of Life and Sexual Difference: Irigaray and Tymieniecka. Analecta Husserliana 89:231-242.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Anthony David (2005). Le Doeuff and Irigaray on Descartes. In Stephen H. Daniel (ed.), Current Continental Theory and Modern Philosophy. Northwestern University Press. 367-382.
  44. Joyce N. Davidson & Mick Smith (1999). Wittgenstein and Irigaray: Gender and Philosophy in a Language (Game) of Difference. Hypatia 14 (2):72-96.
    : Drawing Wittgenstein's and Irigaray's philosophies into conversation might help resolve certain misunderstandings that have so far hampered both the reception of Irigaray's work and the development of feminist praxis in general. A Wittgensteinian reading of Irigaray can furnish an anti-essentialist conception of "woman" that retains the theoretical and political specificity feminism requires while dispelling charges that Irigaray's attempt to delineate a "feminine" language is either groundlessly utopian or entails a biological essentialism.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (10 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Joyce Nira Davidson & Mick Smith (1999). Wittgenstein and Irigaray: Gender and Philosophy in a Language (Game) of Difference. Hypatia 14 (2):72 - 96.
    Drawing Wittgenstein's and Irigaray's philosophies into conversation might help resolve certain misunderstandings that have so far hampered both the reception of Irigaray's work and the development of feminist praxis in general. A Wittgensteinian reading of Irigaray can furnish an anti-essentialist conception of "woman" that retains the theoretical and political specificity feminism requires while dispelling charges that Irigaray's attempt to delineate a "feminine" language is either groundlessly utopian or entails a biological essentialism.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Penelope Deutscher (2010). Conditionalities, Exclusions, Occlusions. In Elena Tzelepis & Athena Athanasiou (eds.), Rewriting Difference: Luce Irigaray and "the Greeks". State University of New York Press.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Penelope Deutscher (2003). Between East and West and the Politics of `Cultural Ingénuité`: Irigaray on Cultural Difference. Theory, Culture and Society 20 (3):65-75.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Penelope Deutscher (2002). A Politics of Impossible Difference: The Later Work of Luce Irigaray. Cornell University Press.
    Sexual difference as a basis of equality : an introduction to Irigarayan politics -- Irigaray on language : from the speech of dementia to the problem of sexual indifference -- Rethinking the politics of recognition : the declaration of Irigarayan sexuate rights -- Irigarayan performativity : is this a question of can saying it make it so? -- Sexuate genre : ethics and politics for improper selves -- Anticipating sexual difference : mediation, love, and divinity -- Interrogating an unasked question (...)
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Penelope Deutscher (2000). Disappropriations: Luce Irigaray and Sarah Kofman. In Dorothea Olkowski (ed.), Resistance, Flight, Creation: Feminist Enactments of French Philosophy. Cornell University Press.
  50. Penelope Deutscher (2000). Love Discourses, Sexed Discourses: Luce Irigaray's Être Deux. [REVIEW] Continental Philosophy Review 33 (2):113-131.
    Luce Irigaray''s Être deux (1997) synthesises her linguistic research with an interpretation of Sartre, Merleau-Ponty and Lévinas. The linguistic research focuses on consistency both of an individual subject''s discourse, and of the overall research findings (rather than the presence of inconsistency in those findings) to reinforce Irigaray''s argument that there is a relationship between sexual difference and sexed language use. Previously in her work, Irigaray''s philosophical and linguistic research were held more distinct. Être deux speculates on the extent to which (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 260