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  1. M. Anderson, S. L. Anderson & C. Armen (eds.) (2005). Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence Fall Symposium Technical Report.
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  2. William Sims Bainbridge (2012). Whole-Personality Emulation. International Journal of Machine Consciousness 4 (01):159-175.
  3. Parthasarathi Banerjee (2007). Technology of Culture: The Roadmap of a Journey Undertaken. [REVIEW] AI and Society 21 (4):411-419.
    Artificial intelligence (AI) impacts society and an individual in many subtler and deeper ways than machines based upon the physics and mechanics of descriptive objects. The AI project involves thus culture and provides scope to liberational undertakings. Most importantly AI implicates human ethical and attitudinal bearings. This essay explores how previous authors in this journal have explored related issues and how such discourses have provided to the present world a roadmap that can be followed to engage in discourses with ethical (...)
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  4. Oliver Bendel (forthcoming). Considerations About the Relationship Between Animal and Machine Ethics. AI and Society.
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  5. Whitby Blay (2013). When is Any Agent a Moral Agent?: Reflections on Machine Consciousness and Moral Agency. International Journal of Machine Consciousness 5 (1).
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  6. Magnus Boman (1999). Norms in Artificial Decision Making. Artificial Intelligence and Law 7 (1):17-35.
    A method for forcing norms onto individual agents in a multi-agent system is presented. The agents under study are supersoft agents: autonomous artificial agents programmed to represent and evaluate vague and imprecise information. Agents are further assumed to act in accordance with advice obtained from a normative decision module, with which they can communicate. Norms act as global constraints on the evaluations performed in the decision module and hence no action that violates a norm will be suggested to any agent. (...)
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  7. Nick Bostrom, Ethical Issues in Advanced Artificial Intelligence.
    The ethical issues related to the possible future creation of machines with general intellectual capabilities far outstripping those of humans are quite distinct from any ethical problems arising in current automation and information systems. Such superintelligence would not be just another technological development; it would be the most important invention ever made, and would lead to explosive progress in all scientific and technological fields, as the superintelligence would conduct research with superhuman efficiency. To the extent that ethics is a cognitive (...)
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  8. Selmer Bringsjord (2007). Ethical Robots: The Future Can Heed Us. [REVIEW] AI and Society 22 (4):539-550.
    Bill Joy’s deep pessimism is now famous. Why the Future Doesn’t Need Us, his defense of that pessimism, has been read by, it seems, everyone—and many of these readers, apparently, have been converted to the dark side, or rather more accurately, to the future-is-dark side. Fortunately (for us; unfortunately for Joy), the defense, at least the part of it that pertains to AI and robotics, fails. Ours may be a dark future, but we cannot know that on the basis of (...)
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  9. David J. Calverley (2007). Imagining a Non-Biological Machine as a Legal Person. AI and Society 22 (4):523-537.
    As non-biological machines come to be designed in ways which exhibit characteristics comparable to human mental states, the manner in which the law treats these entities will become increasingly important both to designers and to society at large. The direct question will become whether, given certain attributes, a non-biological machine could ever be viewed as a legal person. In order to begin to understand the ramifications of this question, this paper starts by exploring the distinction between the related concepts of (...)
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  10. Ginevra Castellano & Christopher Peters (2010). Socially Perceptive Robots: Challenges and Concerns. Interaction Studies 11 (2):201-207.
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  11. Mark Coeckelbergh (2009). Virtual Moral Agency, Virtual Moral Responsibility: On the Moral Significance of the Appearance, Perception, and Performance of Artificial Agents. [REVIEW] AI and Society 24 (2):181-189.
  12. Roberto Cordeschi & Guglielmo Tamburrini (2005). Intelligent Machines and Warfare: Historical Debates and Epistemologically Motivated Concerns. In L. Magnani (ed.), European Computing and Philosophy Conference (ECAP 2004). College Publications.
    The early examples of self-directing robots attracted the interest of both scientific and military communities. Biologists regarded these devices as material models of animal tropisms. Engineers envisaged the possibility of turning self-directing robots into new “intelligent” torpedoes during World War I. Starting from World War II, more extensive interactions developed between theoretical inquiry and applied military research on the subject of adaptive and intelligent machinery. Pioneers of Cybernetics were involved in the development of goal-seeking warfare devices. But collaboration occasionally turned (...)
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  13. Emad Abdel Rahim Dahiyat (2007). Intelligent Agents and Contracts: Is a Conceptual Rethink Imperative? [REVIEW] Artificial Intelligence and Law 15 (4):375-390.
    The emergence of intelligent software agents that operate autonomously with little or no human intervention has generated many doctrinal questions at a conceptual level and has challenged the traditional rules of contract especially those relating to the intention as an essential requirement of any contract conclusion. In this paper, we will try to explore some of these challenges, and shed light on the conflict between the traditional contract theory and the transactional practice in the case of using intelligent software agents. (...)
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  14. Ezio Di Nucci & Filippo Santoni de Sio (forthcoming). Who’s Afraid of Robots? Fear of Automation and the Ideal of Direct Control. In Fiorella Battaglia & Natalie Weidenfeld (eds.), Roboethics in Film. Pisa University Press.
    We argue that lack of direct and conscious control is not, in principle, a reason to be afraid of machines in general and robots in particular: in order to articulate the ethical and political risks of increasing automation one must, therefore, tackle the difficult task of precisely delineating the theoretical and practical limits of sustainable delegation to robots.
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  15. Gordana Dodig Crnkovic & Daniel Persson (2008). Sharing Moral Responsibility with Robots: A Pragmatic Approach. In Holst, Per Kreuger & Peter Funk (eds.), Frontiers in Artificial Intelligence and Applications Volume 173. IOS Press Books.
    Roboethics is a recently developed field of applied ethics which deals with the ethical aspects of technologies such as robots, ambient intelligence, direct neural interfaces and invasive nano-devices and intelligent soft bots. In this article we look specifically at the issue of (moral) responsibility in artificial intelligent systems. We argue for a pragmatic approach, where responsibility is seen as a social regulatory mechanism. We claim that having a system which takes care of certain tasks intelligently, learning from experience and making (...)
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  16. David Feil-Seifer & Maja J. Mataric (2010). Dry Your Eyes: Examining the Roles of Robots for Childcare Applications. Interaction Studies 11 (2):208-213.
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  17. Luciano Floridi & J. W. Sanders (2004). On the Morality of Artificial Agents. Minds and Machines 14 (3):349-379.
    Artificial agents (AAs), particularly but not only those in Cyberspace, extend the class of entities that can be involved in moral situations. For they can be conceived of as moral patients (as entities that can be acted upon for good or evil) and also as moral agents (as entities that can perform actions, again for good or evil). In this paper, we clarify the concept of agent and go on to separate the concerns of morality and responsibility of agents (most (...)
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  18. Christopher Grau (2011). There is No 'I' in 'Robot': Robots and Utilitarianism (Expanded & Revised). In Susan Anderson & Michael Anderson (eds.), Machine Ethics. Cambridge University Press. 451.
    Utilizing the film I, Robot as a springboard, I here consider the feasibility of robot utilitarians, the moral responsibilities that come with the creation of ethical robots, and the possibility of distinct ethics for robot-robot interaction as opposed to robot-human interaction. (This is a revised and expanded version of an essay that originally appeared in IEEE: Intelligent Systems.).
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  19. Christopher Grau (2006). There is No ‘I’ in ‘Robot’: Robots & Utilitarianism. IEEE Intelligent Systems 21 (4):52-55.
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  20. Graham Greenleaf, Andrew Mowbray & Peter Dijk (1995). Representing and Using Legal Knowledge in Integrated Decision Support Systems: Datalex Workstations. [REVIEW] Artificial Intelligence and Law 3 (1-2):97-142.
    There is more to legal knowledge representation than knowledge-bases. It is valuable to look at legal knowledge representation and its implementation across the entire domain of computerisation of law, rather than focussing on sub-domains such as legal expert systems. The DataLex WorkStation software and applications developed using it are used to provide examples. Effective integration of inferencing, hypertext and text retrieval can overcome some of the limitations of these current paradigms of legal computerisation which are apparent when they are used (...)
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  21. David J. Gunkel (2014). A Vindication of the Rights of Machines. Philosophy and Technology 27 (1):113-132.
    This essay responds to the machine question in the affirmative, arguing that artifacts, like robots, AI, and other autonomous systems, can no longer be legitimately excluded from moral consideration. The demonstration of this thesis proceeds in four parts or movements. The first and second parts approach the subject by investigating the two constitutive components of the ethical relationship—moral agency and patiency. In the process, they each demonstrate failure. This occurs not because the machine is somehow unable to achieve what is (...)
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  22. Deborah G. Johnson & Thomas M. Powers (2008). Computers as Surrogate Agents. In M. J. van den Joven & J. Weckert (eds.), Information Technology and Moral Philosophy. Cambridge University Press. 251.
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  23. Gert-Jan Lokhorst (2011). Computational Meta-Ethics. Minds and Machines 21 (2):261-274.
    It has been argued that ethically correct robots should be able to reason about right and wrong. In order to do so, they must have a set of do’s and don’ts at their disposal. However, such a list may be inconsistent, incomplete or otherwise unsatisfactory, depending on the reasoning principles that one employs. For this reason, it might be desirable if robots were to some extent able to reason about their own reasoning—in other words, if they had some meta-ethical capacities. (...)
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  24. Gert-Jan Lokhorst (2011). Erratum To: Computational Meta-Ethics. [REVIEW] Minds and Machines 21 (3):475-475.
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  25. Catrin Misselhorn, Ulrike Pompe & Mog Stapleton (2013). Ethical Considerations Regarding the Use of Social Robots in the Fourth Age. Geropsych 26 (2):121-133.
    The debate about the use of robots in the care of older adults has often been dominated by either overly optimistic visions (coming particularly from Japan), in which robots are seamlessly incorporated into society thereby enhancing quality of life for everyone; or by extremely pessimistic scenarios that paint such a future as horrifying. We reject this dichotomy and argue for a more differentiated ethical evaluation of the possibilities and risks involved with the use of social robots. In a critical discussion (...)
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  26. Javier R. Movellan (2010). Warning: The Author of This Document May Have No Mental States. Read at Your Own Risk. Interaction Studies 11 (2):238-245.
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  27. Peter Olsthoorn & Lamber Royakkers (2014). Military Robots and the Question of Responsibility. International Journal of Technoethics 5 (1):01-14.
    Most unmanned systems used in operations today are unarmed and mainly used for reconnaissance and mine clearing, yet the increase of the number of armed military robots is undeniable. The use of these robots raises some serious ethical questions. For instance: who can be held morally responsible in reason when a military robot is involved in an act of violence that would normally be described as a war crime? In this article, we critically assess the attribution of responsibility with respect (...)
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  28. Peter Olsthoorn & Lambèr Royakkers, Risks and Robots – Some Ethical Issues. Archive International Society for Military Ethics, 2011.
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  29. Steve Petersen (forthcoming). Designing People to Serve. In Patrick Lin, George Bekey & Keith Abney (eds.), Robot Ethics. MIT Press.
    I argue that, contrary to intuition, it would be both possible and permissible to design people - whether artificial or organic - who by their nature desire to do tasks we find unpleasant.
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  30. Dean Petters, Everett Waters & Felix Schonbrodt (2010). Strange Carers: Robots as Attachment Figures and Aids to Parenting. Interaction Studies 11 (2):246-252.
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  31. Thomas M. Powers (2011). Incremental Machine Ethics. IEEE Robotics and Automation 18 (1):51-58.
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  32. Thomas M. Powers (2009). Machines and Moral Reasoning. Philosophy Now 72:15-16.
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  33. Thomas M. Powers (2006). Prospects for a Kantian Machine. IEEE Intelligent Systems 21 (4):46-51.
    This paper is reprinted in the book Machine Ethics, eds. M. Anderson and S. Anderson, Cambridge University Press, 2011.
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  34. Noel Sharkey & Amanda Sharkey (2010). Robot Nannies Get a Wheel in the Door: A Response to the Commentaries. Interaction Studies 11 (2):302-313.
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  35. Noel Sharkey & Amanda Sharkey (2010). The Crying Shame of Robot Nannies: An Ethical Appraisal. Interaction Studies 11 (2):161-190.
    Childcare robots are being manufactured and developed with the long term aim of creating surrogate carers. While total childcare is not yet being promoted, there are indications that it is 'on the cards'. We examine recent research and developments in childcare robots and speculate on progress over the coming years by extrapolating from other ongoing robotics work. Our main aim is to raise ethical questions about the part or full-time replacement of primary carers. The questions are about human rights, privacy, (...)
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  36. Robert Sparrow & Linda Sparrow (2006). In the Hands of Machines? The Future of Aged Care. Minds and Machines 16 (2):141-161.
    It is remarkable how much robotics research is promoted by appealing to the idea that the only way to deal with a looming demographic crisis is to develop robots to look after older persons. This paper surveys and assesses the claims made on behalf of robots in relation to their capacity to meet the needs of older persons. We consider each of the roles that has been suggested for robots in aged care and attempt to evaluate how successful robots might (...)
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  37. John P. Sullins (2010). Robowarfare: Can Robots Be More Ethical Than Humans on the Battlefield? [REVIEW] Ethics and Information Technology 12 (3):263-275.
    Telerobotically operated and semiautonomous machines have become a major component in the arsenals of industrial nations around the world. By the year 2015 the United States military plans to have one-third of their combat aircraft and ground vehicles robotically controlled. Although there are many reasons for the use of robots on the battlefield, perhaps one of the most interesting assertions are that these machines, if properly designed and used, will result in a more just and ethical implementation of warfare. This (...)
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  38. Ryan Tonkens (2009). A Challenge for Machine Ethics. Minds and Machines 19 (3):421-438.
    That the successful development of fully autonomous artificial moral agents (AMAs) is imminent is becoming the received view within artificial intelligence research and robotics. The discipline of Machines Ethics, whose mandate is to create such ethical robots, is consequently gaining momentum. Although it is often asked whether a given moral framework can be implemented into machines, it is never asked whether it should be. This paper articulates a pressing challenge for Machine Ethics: To identify an ethical framework that is both (...)
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  39. Carme Torras (2010). Robbie, the Pioneer Robot Nanny: Science Fiction Helps Develop Ethical Social Opinion. Interaction Studies 11 (2):269-273.
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  40. Simon Peter van Rysewyk & Matthijs Pontier (eds.) (forthcoming). Machine Medical Ethics. Springer.
    In medical settings, machines are in close proximity with human beings: with patients who are in vulnerable states of health, who have disabilities of various kinds, with the very young or very old, and with medical professionals. Machines in these contexts are undertaking important medical tasks that require emotional sensitivity, knowledge of medical codes, human dignity, and privacy. -/- As machine technology advances, ethical concerns become more urgent: should medical machines be programmed to follow a code of medical ethics? What (...)
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  41. Wendell Wallach (2010). Applied Ethicists: Naysayers or Problem Solvers? Interaction Studies 11 (2):283-289.
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  42. Wendell Wallach, Colin Allen & Iva Smit (2007). Machine Morality: Bottom-Up and Top-Down Approaches for Modelling Human Moral Faculties. [REVIEW] AI and Society 22 (4):565-582.
    The implementation of moral decision making abilities in artificial intelligence (AI) is a natural and necessary extension to the social mechanisms of autonomous software agents and robots. Engineers exploring design strategies for systems sensitive to moral considerations in their choices and actions will need to determine what role ethical theory should play in defining control architectures for such systems. The architectures for morally intelligent agents fall within two broad approaches: the top-down imposition of ethical theories, and the bottom-up building of (...)
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  43. Christopher Wareham (2011). On the Moral Equality of Artificial Agents. International Journal of Technoethics 2 (1):35-42.
    Artificial agents such as robots are performing increasingly significant ethical roles in society. As a result, there is a growing literature regarding their moral status with many suggesting it is justified to regard manufactured entities as having intrinsic moral worth. However, the question of whether artificial agents could have the high degree of moral status that is attributed to human persons has largely been neglected. To address this question, the author developed a respect-based account of the ethical criteria for the (...)
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  44. Blay Whitby (2010). Oversold, Unregulated, and Unethical: Why We Need to Respond to Robot Nannies. Interaction Studies 11 (2):290-294.
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  45. Jeffrey White (forthcoming). Manufacturing Morality A General Theory of Moral Agency Grounding Computational Implementations: The ACTWith Model. In Computational Intelligence. Nova Publications.
    The ultimate goal of research into computational intelligence is the construction of a fully embodied and fully autonomous artificial agent. This ultimate artificial agent must not only be able to act, but it must be able to act morally. In order to realize this goal, a number of challenges must be met, and a number of questions must be answered, the upshot being that, in doing so, the form of agency to which we must aim in developing artificial agents comes (...)
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  46. Eliezer Yudkowsky, Creating Friendly AI.