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  1. John K. Alexander (2003). Pragmatic Decision Making. Philosophy of Management 3 (3):67-77.
    I was in manufacturing for over thirty years and a manager for nearly twenty-five. During that time it never occurred to me that the consequentialist, utilitarian framework I used was inadequate as a conceptual framework for making decisions to ensure organisational viability and success. The framework gave three criteria which enabled me to construct a rational approach to issues associated with my role as a manager:(i) to make product at the lowest possible cost so as to maximise the bottom line;(ii) (...)
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  2. John M. Alexander & Jane Buckingham (2011). Common Good Leadership in Business Management: An Ethical Model From the Indian Tradition. Business Ethics 20 (4):317-327.
    While dominant management thinking is steered by profit maximisation, this paper proposes that sustained organisational growth can best be stimulated by attention to the common good and the capacity of corporate leaders to create commitment to the common good. The leadership thinking of Kautilya and Ashoka embodies this principle. Both offer a common good approach, emphasising the leader's moral and legal responsibility for people's welfare, the robust interaction between the business community and the state, and the importance of moral training (...)
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  3. Mark Alfino, Business Failure and Corporate Managerial Responsibility.
    When businesses fail, their ability to honor agreements, uphold promises, and act on the higher ideals of their mission statements is often compromised. Following the ethical maxim that Aought implies can, @ business ethicists often grant that our practical obligations have to be understood against the backdrop of the relative scarcity or abundance of the business and social environment. Nothing brings on scarcity more dramatically than the total liquidation of a business =s assets. Bankruptcy protection and reorganization can, and probably (...)
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  4. Mark Alfino (1998). Traditional Vs. Information Management Theory. Journal of Information Ethics 7 (1):5-9.
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  5. Bandar Alharthey & Amran Rasli (2012). The Use of Human Resource Management Systems in the Saudi Market. Asian Journal of Business Ethics 1 (2):163 - 176.
    Abstract The goal of the study was to investigate the current situation with Human Resources (HR) systems in the Saudi market on the basis of survey conducted among 100 organizations. Their HR and IT experts were to fill out a questionnaire that allowed receiving their expert opinion and make conclusions considering the HR systems usage in this country. In the course of the study, eight hypotheses were investigated and proved: the number of companies’ users of Human Resource Management (HRM) systems (...)
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  6. John Angelidis & Nabil A. Ibrahim (2011). The Impact of Emotional Intelligence on the Ethical Judgment of Managers. Journal of Business Ethics 99 (S1):111-119.
    In recent years there has been a substantial amount of research on emotional intelligence (EI) across a wide range of disciplines. Also, this term has been receiving increasing attention in the popular business press. This article extends previous research by seeking to determine whether there is a relationship between emotional intelligence and ethical judgment among practicing managers with respect to questions of ethical nature that can arise in their professional activity. It analyzes the results of a survey of 324 managers (...)
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  7. Robin Attfield (2001). To Do No Harm? The Precautionary Principle and Moral Values. Philosophy of Management 1 (3):11-20.
    From over 2000 years ago the ideal expressed in the Hippocratic Oath has encouraged doctors never knowingly to do harm: primum non nocere. Over 25 years ago the management writer Peter Drucker proposed it as the basis of a management ethic, ‘the right rule for the ethics managers need, the ethics of responsibility’. He argued then that the rule had wide scope encompassing for instance executive compensation, management rhetoric and the management of business impacts. In 2000 the United Nations Global (...)
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  8. Loréa Baïada-Hirèche, Jean Pasquero & Jean-François Chanlat (2011). Managerial Responsibility as Negotiated Order: A Social Construction Perspective. Journal of Business Ethics 101 (S1):17-31.
    This article examines how employees form their perceptions of managerial responsibility in a concrete organizational setting. Drawing on negotiated order theory, it shows that these perceptions are the result of complex processes of social construction and negotiation, rather than the application of predetermined ethics models or norms. Employees’ perceptions appear to be unstable; they are subject to constant alterations, fluctuating with the organizational circumstances, and are likely to create considerable organizational perturbations, especially when managers make complex and ambiguous decisions. This (...)
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  9. Annika Beelitz & Doris M. Merkl-Davies (2012). Using Discourse to Restore Organisational Legitimacy: 'CEO-Speak' After an Incident in a German Nuclear Power Plant. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 108 (1):101-120.
    We analyse managerial discourse in corporate communication (‘CEO-speak’) during a 6-month period following a legitimacy-threatening event in the form of an incident in a German nuclear power plant. As discourses express specific stances expressed by a group of people who share particular beliefs and values, they constitute an important means of restoring organisational legitimacy when social rules and norms have been violated. Using an analytical framework based on legitimacy as a process of reciprocal sense-making and consisting of three levels of (...)
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  10. Ron Berger, Chong Ju Choi & Jai Boem Kim (2011). Responsible Leadership for Multinational Enterprises in Bottom of Pyramid Countries: The Knowledge of Local Managers. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 101 (4):553-561.
    The gulf between multinational enterprises’ focus on high income countries and the reality of 80% of the world living in developing, bottom of pyramid (Hahn, J Bus Ethics 84:313–324, 2009 ) economies could magnify the anti-globalisation movement and political backlashes in the twenty-first century. The global financial crisis of 2008 and 2009 has increased such social tensions throughout the world and creates greater challenges for, responsible leadership. In this conceptual article, the authors analyse the value and identity of local managers, (...)
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  11. Michael G. Bowen & F. Clark Power (1993). The Moral Manager. Business Ethics Quarterly 3 (2):97-115.
    For many, the case of the Exxon Valdez oil spill has become a symbol of unethical corporate behavior. Had Exxon’s managers not callously pursued their own interests at the expense of the environment and other parties, the accident would not have happened. In this paper, we (1) present a short case study of the Valdez incident; (2) argue that many analyses of the case either ignore or fail to give sufficient weight to the uncertainties managers often face when they make (...)
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  12. Teresa Brady (1994). The Obese. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 8 (2):23-28.
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  13. S. K. Chakraborty (2001). Management and Ethics Omnibus: Management by Values, Ethics in Management, Values and Ethics for Organizations. OUP India.
    This omnibus comprises three outstanding books by Professor S.K. Chakraborty on the need for value-driven management and corporate ethics - "Management by Values", "Ethics in Management", and "Values and Ethics for Organizations".
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  14. Ashish Chandra & Andrew Sikula Sr (2002). Health Care Organization Managers Beware-Understand Your Ethical Constraints. Ethics and Behavior 12 (2):191-195.
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  15. Ashish Chandra & Andrew Sikula (2002). Health Care Organization Managers Beware-Understand Your Ethical Constraints. Ethics and Behavior 12 (2):191-195.
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  16. Nelarine Cornelius & Nigel Laurie (2003). Capable Management. Philosophy of Management 3 (1):3-16.
    Martha Nussbaum is one of the most prolific and distinguished philosophers in the English-speaking world. Since 1995 she has been Ernst Freund Distinguished Service Professor of Law and Ethics at the University of Chicago appointed in the Law School, Philosophy Department and Divinity School. She is an Associate in the Classics Department and the Political Science Department, an Affiliate of the Committee on Southern Asian Studies, a Board Member of the Human Rights Program and founder and Coordinator of a new (...)
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  17. N. Cugueró-Escofet & J. M. Rosanas (2012). Justice as a Crucial Formal and Informal Element of Management Control Systems. Ramon Llull Journal of Applied Ethics 3 (3):155.
    Management control systems include justice implicitly, as they believe that the market provides what is just or not through the market value. Psychological literature has deemed that people can perceive which procedures and decisions are just or not. In this paper, we argue that management control systems need to include justice criteria explicitly, beyond mere market value, in both their design (formal justice) and use (informal justice). This will increase the probability that organizational members will collaborate to achieve organizational goals.
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  18. Scott Elaurant & Julian Lamont (2012). Assessing Whether CEOs Deserve Their Pay. Australian Journal of Professional and Applied Ethics 14 (1):78-91.
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  19. Mark McNeilly (1997). Sun Tzu and the Art of Business: Six Strategic Principles for Managers. OUP USA.
    To hand down the wisdom he had gained from years of battles, more than two millenia ago the famous Chinese general Sun Tzu wrote the classic work on military strategy, The Art of War. Because business, like warfare, is dynamic, fast-paced, and requires an effective and efficient use of scarce resources, modern executives have found value in Sun Tzu's teachings. But The Art of War is arranged for the military leader and not the CEO, so making connections between ancient warfare (...)
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  20. Tina L. Robbins & Ben C. Jeffords (2010). Practising What We Preach: Justice and Ethical Instruction in Management Education. Ethics and Education 4 (1):93-102.
    Building on organizational justice research, we extended the study of classroom justice to management education. In the first study, we identified the criteria that business students use to define distributive, procedural, and interactional fairness. In a second study, we found that management students' perceptions of both procedural and interactional fairness were significant and unique predictors of their evaluations of instructional effectiveness. However, procedural justice was the only significant predictor of overall evaluations of the course. Results of this study will aid (...)
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  21. John T. Sanders (1994). How Ethical Is Investigative Testing? Employment Testing Law and Policy Reporter 3 (2):17-23, 35.
    Analyzing three key cases that arose in 1993, I argue that the practice of sending in "testers" -- persons posing as job applicants -- to ferret out workplace discrimination is easier to defend from an ethical standpoint in an agency's investigation stems from an actual complaint. By contrast, defendants may rightfully challenge the legitimacy of the procedures used for "test" subjects when an investigation is based solely on the general goals of an antidiscrimination agency.
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  22. G. Loek J. Schönbeck (2012). Is Pathology Dysfunctional? Philosophy of Management 11 (3):47-65.
    An enterprising odyssey might be one way to investigate whether a unique role is afforded to ‘a’ philosophy of management. The question is, first, which philosophy is at stake and what finery such a philosophy might bear. Second, three cardinal questions arise: (1) “What can we say about it?“; (2) “How do we know we can or cannot say something about it?“; and (3) “What is its relation to rationality?” Third, by an old scepticist tradition one may choose tantalising innersubjects (...)
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Bluffing and Fraud in Business
  1. Howard Adelman (1991). Morality and Ethics in Organizational Administration. Journal of Business Ethics 10 (9):665 - 678.
    The article is a detailed case study of theft and fraud by an employee in an organization. The analysis suggests that in the process of dealing with the employee, the issue was notprimarily one of ethics, but of two moral principles in conflict, compassion and concern for a fellow human being and the morality governing responses to betrayal. The latter governed the results because that morality was congruent with the predominant ethics of the organization concerned with preserving the authority structure (...)
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  2. Juan M. Elegido (2011). The Ethics of Price Discrimination. Business Ethics Quarterly 21 (4):633-660.
    Price discrimination is the practice of charging different customers different prices for the same product. Many people consider price discrimination unfair, but economists argue that in many cases price discrimination is more likely to lead to greater welfare than is the uniform pricing alternative—sometimes for every party in the transaction. This article shows i) that there are many situations in which it is necessary to engage in differential pricing in order to make the provision of a product possible; and ii) (...)
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Corporate Philanthropy
  1. Louis H. Amato & Christie H. Amato (2012). Retail Philanthropy: Firm Size, Industry, and Business Cycle. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 107 (4):435-448.
    This article investigates the effects of firm size, profitability, industry affiliation, and the business cycle on retailer philanthropy. The importance of industry and firm effects on giving was analyzed with regression models using industry-fixed effects as well as firm strategy variables. The analysis included instrumental variables methodology to account for simultaneity in the charitable giving–profits relationship. Data were gathered from the IRS Corporate Statistics of Income Sourcebook, data that provide firm size class measures covering the entire firm size distribution ranging (...)
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  2. Denise Baden, Edgar Meyer & Marianna Tonne (2011). Which Types of Strategic Corporate Philanthropy Lead to Higher Moral Capital? Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 22:163-175.
    The purpose of this research paper is to identify which types of corporate philanthropy (CP): cause-related marketing (CRM) or sponsorship, create higher moralcapital under two conditions: proactive or reactive (following a scandal). Results showed that CP created higher moral capital for a proactive company than for a reactive company. Both CRM and sponsorship were perceived as more sincere in the proactive company than the reactive company. However, CRM was seen as self-serving in the reactive company, but not the proactive company. (...)
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  3. Stephen Brammer & Lance Moir (2005). Why Do Companies Make Philanthropic Donations? Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 16:75-80.
    This paper analyses the areas of philanthropic expenditure prioritized by a sample of 164 large UK companies within a model that draws on economics and stakeholder theory. Broadly, our evidence suggests that firms make systematic choices over the alternative destinations of their philanthropic donations in ways that are rationalisable by reference to the particular strategic benefits that are associated with their business environments. Specifically, we identify statistically significant preferences for medical research among hitechnology companies, environmental causes among firms active in (...)
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  4. David E. Ohreen & Roger A. Petry (2012). Imperfect Duties and Corporate Philanthropy: A Kantian Approach. Journal of Business Ethics 106 (3):367-381.
    Nonprofit organizations play a crucial role in society. Unfortunately, many such organizations are chronically underfunded and struggle to meet their objectives. These facts have significant implications for corporate philanthropy and Kant’s notion of imperfect duties. Under the concept of imperfect duties, businesses would have wide discretion regarding which charities receive donations, how much money to give, and when such donations take place. A perceived problem with imperfect duties is that they can lead to moral laxity; that is, a failure on (...)
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Corruption in Business
  1. Robert J. Aalberts & Marianne M. Jennings (1999). The Ethics of Slotting: Is This Bribery, Facilitation Marketing or Just Plain Competition? [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 20 (3):207 - 215.
    The practice of manufacturers' payments of fees to retailers for the display and sale of their products has become a common practice. In the grocery retail business, the fees paid by manufacturers are called slotting fees, or a payment made for a slot on the shelf. The same practice is used now in the retail book industry. Large book chains command high fees from publishers for the prominent display of books. Entrepreneur's products are often precluded from stores and markets because (...)
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  2. James J. Brummer (1985). The Foreign Corrupt Practices Act and the Imposition of Values. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 2 (3):1-17.
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  3. Margot Cleveland, Christopher M. Favo, Thomas J. Frecka & Charles L. Owens (forthcoming). Trends in the International Fight Against Bribery and Corruption. Journal of Business Ethics.
    Over the past decade, we have witnessed some early signs of progress in the battle against international bribery and corruption, a problem that throughout the history of commerce had previously been ignored. We present a model that we then use to assess progress in reducing bribery. The model components include both hard law and soft law legislation components and enforcement and compliance components. We begin by summarizing the literature that convincingly argues that bribery is an immoral and unethical practice and (...)
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  4. Dan Demetriou (2013). The Virtues of Honorable Business Executives. In Mike Austin (ed.), Virtues in Action: New Essays in Applied Virtue Ethics. Palgrave Macmillan. 29-38.
    Although most cultures have held honorableness to be a virtue of the first importance, contemporary analytic ethicists have just begun to consider honor’s nature and ethical worth. In this essay, I provide an analysis of the honor ethos and apply it to business ethics. Applying honor to business may appear to be a particularly challenging task, since (for reasons I discuss) honor has traditionally been seen as incompatible with commerce. Nonetheless, I argue here that two of the central virtues of (...)
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  5. Parker English (1989). Bribery and the United States Foreign Corrupt Practices Act. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 4 (4):13-23.
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  6. Carolyn Erdener, Pedro Gabriel Márquez Pérez & Joaquin Flores Mendez (2007). Cultural Perspectives of Managerial Ethics and Corruption. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 18:15-20.
    International business enterprises face a number of ethical issues when conducting business in unfamiliar parts of the world, especially in places wherecorruption is deeply rooted. This is the situation in Latin America - a highly heterogeneous region characterized by cultural complexity, inconsistencies, andcontradictions at multiple levels of society, with implications for business ethics that are potentially as troubling to outsiders as they are opaque.We briefly indicate the relevant academic literature on this subject, noting that studies of business ethics in Latin (...)
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  7. Anechiarico Frank (1997). [Book Review] the Pursuit of Absolute Integrity, How Corruption Control Makes Government Ineffective. [REVIEW] Criminal Justice Ethics 16 (2).
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  8. Turgut Guvenli & Rajib Sanyal (2012). Perception and Understanding of Bribery in International Business. Ethics and Behavior 22 (5):333 - 348.
    This study examines attitudes toward bribery in international business and whether such attitudes differ between men and women. Results of surveys of adults studying for careers in international business indicate ambivalent and nuanced attitudes over bribe giving/taking with significant differences by sex with respect to specific hypothetical situations, suggesting a gender gap on matters of bribery. It is recommended that academic curriculum and management development programs stress ethics and legality and focus on the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act and similar antibribery (...)
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  9. James B. Jacobs & Frank Anechiarico (1992). Blacklisting Public Contractors as an Anti‐Corruption and Racketeering Strategy. Criminal Justice Ethics 11 (2):64-76.
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  10. Eileen P. Kelly, Alka Bramhandkar & Hormoz Movassaghi (2009). A Case Study of Ethics and Mutual Funds Mismanagement at Putnam. Ethics and Behavior 19 (1):25 – 35.
    This case study examines the failure of top management at Putnam to exercise ethical behavior in the face of their clear knowledge of corruption in the company. Market timing by employees was expressly forbidden by Putnam. Six employees, including two portfolio managers, repeatedly engaged in market timing activities from 1998 to 2003, garnering over a million dollars in personal profit. The CEO and key senior executives had factual knowledge of the abuses. Management failed to stop the abuses or to discipline (...)
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  11. Lawrence Lessig (2013). FOREWORD: “Institutional Corruption” Defined. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 41 (3):553-555.
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  12. Antonino Vaccaro (2012). To Pay or Not to Pay? Dynamic Transparency and the Fight Against the Mafia's Extortionists. Journal of Business Ethics 106 (1):23-35.
    This article presents the results of the longitudinal study of Addiopizzo, a successful anti-bribery organization founded in Sicily in 2004. It analyzes how this organization has used information disclosure as a strategy to fight adverse environmental conditions and the immoral activities of the Sicilian Mafia. This article extends the business ethics and corporate social responsibility literature by showing how multi-level strategic information disclosure processes can help gain organizational legitimacy in adverse social environments and successfully fight against social resistance to change, (...)
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Ethical Leadership
  1. Kleio Akrivou, Dimitrios Bourantas, Shenjiang Mo & Evi Papalois (2011). The Sound of Silence – A Space for Morality? The Role of Solitude for Ethical Decision Making. Journal of Business Ethics 102 (1):119-133.
    Building on research and measures on solitude, ethical leadership theories, and decision making literatures, we propose a conceptual model to better understand processes enabling ethical leadership neglected in the literature. The role of solitude as antecedent is explored in this model, whereby its selective utilization focuses inner directionality toward growing authentic executive awareness as a moral person and a moral manager and allows an integration between inner and outer directionality toward ethical leadership and resulting decision-making processes that will have an (...)
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  2. Joel Amernic & Russell Craig (2013). Leadership Discourse, Culture, and Corporate Ethics: CEO-Speak at News Corporation. Journal of Business Ethics 118 (2):379-394.
    We explore the language of leadership of global media mogul Rupert Murdoch in 2010, the year before the phone-hacking scandal in the UK came to public attention. Subsequent public enquiries in the UK exposed unethical conduct by staff of News Corporation, a global corporation whose Chairman and CEO was Rupert Murdoch. We focus on the ethical climate fashioned by ‘A Letter from Rupert Murdoch’ that appeared in the opening pages of the annual report of News Corporation for the year ended (...)
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  3. Barbara Arel, Cathy A. Beaudoin & Anna M. Cianci (2012). The Impact of Ethical Leadership, the Internal Audit Function, and Moral Intensity on a Financial Reporting Decision. Journal of Business Ethics 109 (3):351-366.
    Two elements of corporate governance—the strength of ethical executive leadership and the internal audit function (IAF hereafter)—provide guidance to accounting managers making decisions involving uncertainty. We examine the joint effect of these two factors, manipulated at two levels (strong, weak), in an experiment in which accounting professionals decide whether to book a questionable journal entry (i.e., a journal entry for which a reasonable business case can be made but there is no supporting documentation). We find that ethical leadership and the (...)
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  4. James B. Avey, Tara S. Wernsing & Michael E. Palanski (2012). Exploring the Process of Ethical Leadership: The Mediating Role of Employee Voice and Psychological Ownership. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 107 (1):21-34.
    The study of ethical leadership has emerged as an important topic for understanding the effects of leadership in organizations. In a study with 845 working adults across multiple organizations, the relationships between ethical leadership with positive employee outcomes were examined. Results suggest that ethical leadership is related to both psychological well-being and job satisfaction in employees, but the processes are different. Employee voice mediated the relationship between ethical leadership and psychological well-being. Feelings of psychological ownership mediated the relationship between ethical (...)
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  5. Eliane Bacha & Sandra Walker (2013). The Relationship Between Transformational Leadership and Followers' Perceptions of Fairness. Journal of Business Ethics 116 (3):667-680.
    Of recent time, there has been a concern about ethical leadership and ethics in business. Research on leadership did not pay a lot of attention to fairness and many authors have studied the relationship between leader fairness and factors such as outcome satisfaction and trust in leader for instance. For the moment, there is no study that focused on the direct relationship between transformational leadership and fairness. That’s why; in this paper our aim is to study the relationship between transformational (...)
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  6. Kanika T. Bhal & Anubha Dadhich (2011). Impact of Ethical Leadership and Leader–Member Exchange on Whistle Blowing: The Moderating Impact of the Moral Intensity of the Issue. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 103 (3):485-496.
    Given the prevalence of corporate frauds and the significance of whistle blowing as a mechanism to report about the frauds, the present study explores the impact of ethical leadership and leader–member exchange (LMX) on whistle blowing. Additionally, the article also explores the moderating role of the moral intensity [studied as magnitude of consequences (MOC)] of the issue on this relationship. The article reports results of three experimental studies conducted on the postgraduate students of a premier technology institute in India. Ethical (...)
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  7. Bernard Burnes & Rune Todnem By (2012). Leadership and Change: The Case for Greater Ethical Clarity. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 108 (2):239-252.
    This article addresses the relationship between the ethics underpinning leadership and change. It examines the developments in leadership and change over the last three decades and their ethical implications. It adopts a consequentialist perspective on ethics and uses this to explore different approaches to leadership and change. In particular, the article focuses on individual (egoistic) consequentialism and utilitarian consequentialism. The article argues that all leadership styles and all approaches to change are rooted in a set of values, some of which (...)
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  8. Cam Caldwell, Rolf D. Dixon, Ryan Atkins & Stefan M. Dowdell (2011). Repentance and Continuous Improvement: Ethical Implications for the Modern Leader. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 102 (3):473-487.
    Although leadership of organizations rarely is discussed in terms of the religious construct of repentance, we propose that repentance and continuous improvement are closely related ideas that profoundly impact individuals and organizations. We identify six parallels between repentance and continuous improvement and then show how these parallels apply to the fundamental principles associated with highly regarded leadership perspectives. We conclude by identifying five contributions of the article to the management literature.
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  9. Cam Caldwell, Rolf D. Dixon, Larry A. Floyd, Joe Chaudoin, Jonathan Post & Gaynor Cheokas (2012). Transformative Leadership: Achieving Unparalleled Excellence. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 109 (2):175-187.
    The ongoing cynicism about leaders and organizations calls for a new standard of ethical leadership that we have labeled “transformative leadership.” This new leadership model integrates ethically-based features of six other well-regarded leadership perspectives and combines key normative and instrumental elements of each of those six perspectives. Transformative leadership honors the governance obligations of leaders by demonstrating a commitment to the welfare of all stakeholders and by seeking to optimize long-term wealth creation. Citing the scholarly literature about leadership theory, we (...)
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  10. Kim Cameron (2011). Responsible Leadership as Virtuous Leadership. Journal of Business Ethics 98 (S1):25-35.
    Responsible leadership is rare. It is not that most leaders are irresponsible, but responsibility in leadership is frequently defined so that an important connotation of responsible leadership is ignored. This article equates responsible leadership with virtuousness. Using this connotation implies that responsible leadership is based on three assumptions—eudaemonism, inherent value, and amplification. Secondarily, this connotation produces two important outcomes—a fixed point for coping with change, and benefits for constituencies who may never be affected otherwise. The meaning and advantages of responsible (...)
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