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  1. Tamara Albertini (2010). Marsilio Ficino (1433-1499) : The Aesthetic of the One in the Soul. In Paul Richard Blum (ed.), Philosophers of the Renaissance. Catholic University of America Press.
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  2. John P. Anton (2003). Marcilio Ficino's Plotinus and the Renaissance. Philosophical Inquiry 25 (1-2):1-8.
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  3. M. B. B. (1975). The Secular Is Sacred. Platonism and Thomism in Marsilio Ficino's Platonic Theology. Review of Metaphysics 28 (3):551-552.
  4. Paul Richard Blum (2012). The Epistemology of Immortality: Searle, Pomponazzi, and Ficino. Studia Neoaristotelica 9 (1):85-102.
    The relationship between body and mind was traditionally discussed in terms of immortality of the intellect, because immateriality was one necessary condition for the mind to be immortal. This appeared to be an issue of metaphysics and religion. But to the medieval and Renaissance thinkers, the essence of mind is thinking activity and hence an epistemological feature. Starting with John Searle’s worries about the existence of consciousness, I try to show some parallels with the Aristotelian Pietro Pomponazzi (1462–1525), and eventually (...)
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  5. N. S. C. (1964). John Colet and Marsilio Ficino. Review of Metaphysics 18 (1):177-177.
  6. Joseph Francis Collins (1944). The Philosophy of Marsilio Ficino. The Modern Schoolman 21 (2):111-119.
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  7. Anna Corrias (2012). Imagination and Memory in Marsilio Ficinos Theory of the Vehicles of the Soul1. International Journal of the Platonic Tradition 6 (1):81-114.
    Abstract The ancient Neoplatonic doctrine that the rational soul has one or more vehicles—bodies of a semi-material nature which it acquires during its descent through the spheres—plays a crucial part in Marsilio Ficino's philosophical system, especially in his theory of sense-perception and in his account of the afterlife. Of the soul's three vehicles, the one made of more or less rarefied air is particularly important, according to Ficino, during the soul's embodied existence, for he identifies it with the spiritus , (...)
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  8. James A. Devereux (1978). Marsilio Ficino: The "Philebus" Commentary (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 16 (4):474-475.
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  9. Carol V. Kaske (1987). The Letters of Marsilio Ficino. International Philosophical Quarterly 27 (1):107-108.
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  10. Carol V. Kaske (1982). Marsilio Ficino and the Twelve Gods of the Zodiac. Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes 45:195-202.
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  11. J. King (1964). John Colet and Marsilio Ficino. Augustinianum 4 (1):248-249.
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  12. Burkhard Mojsisch (1999). L'épistémologie dans l'humanisme: Marsile Ficin, Pierre Pomponazzi et Nicolas de Cues. Revue de Métaphysique Et de Morale 2:211-229.
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  13. John Monfasani (1993). Icastes: Marsilio Ficino's Interpretation of Plato's "Sophist" (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 31 (2):284-286.
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  14. F. Saxl (1937). A Marsilio Ficino Manuscript Written in Bruges in 1475, and the Alum Monopoly of the Popes. Journal of the Warburg Institute 1 (1):61-62.
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  15. John Sellars (2012). Renaissance Philosophy. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 20 (6):1195-1204.
    British Journal for the History of Philosophy, Ahead of Print.
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  16. Anne Sheppard (1980). The Influence of Hermias on Marsilio Ficino's Doctrine of Inspiration. Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes 43:97-109.
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  17. James G. Snyder (2011). Marsilio Ficino's Critique of the Lucretian Alternative. Journal of the History of Ideas 72 (2):165-181.
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  18. James G. Snyder (2008). The Theory of Materia Prima in Marsilio Ficino's Platonic Theology. Vivarium 46 (2):192-221.
    This paper is an examination of the theory of materia prima of the fifteenth century Platonist Marsilio Ficino. It limits its discussion of Ficino's theory to the ontological and epistemic status of prime matter in his Platonic Theology. Ficino holds a "robust" theory of prime matter that makes two fundamental assertions: First, prime matter exists independent of form, and second, it is, at least in principle, intelligible. Ficino's theory of prime matter is framed in this paper with a discussion of (...)
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  19. J. Tate (1944). Medieval Platonism (1) Paul Oskar Kristeller: The Philosophy of Marsilio Ficino. (Columbia Studies in Philosophy, No. 6.) Pp. Xiv+441. New York: Columbia University Press (London: Milford), 1943. Cloth, 30s. Net. (2) Mediaeval and Renaissance Studies. Edited by R. Hunt and R. Klibansky. Vol. I, No. 2. London: Warburg Institute. Paper, 18s. Net. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 58 (02):66-.
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  20. John Wellmuth (1944). The Philosophy of Marsilio Ficino. Thought 19 (4):736-737.
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