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  1. Praveen Aggarwal, Rajiv Vaidyanathan & Stephen Castleberry (2012). Managerial and Public Attitudes Toward Ethics in Marketing Research. Journal of Business Ethics 109 (4):463-481.
    This research updates and significantly extends Akaah and Riordon’s (J Market Res 26:112–120, 1989 ) evaluation of ethical perceptions of marketing research misconduct among marketing research professionals. In addition to examining changes in perceptions toward key marketing research practices over time, we assess professionals’ judgments on the ethicality, importance, and occurrence of a variety of new marketing research ethics situations in both online and offline contexts. In a second study, we assess ethical judgments of the public at large using a (...)
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  2. Thomas Boysen Anker, Peter Sandøe, Tanja Kamin & Klemens Kappel (2011). Health Branding Ethics. Journal of Business Ethics 104 (1):33-45.
    Commercial food health branding is a challenging branch of marketing because it might, at the same time, promote healthy living and be commercially viable. However, the power to influence individuals’ health behavior and overall health status makes it crucial for marketing professionals to take into account the ethical dimensions of health branding: this article presents a conceptual analysis of potential ethical problems in health branding. The analysis focuses on ethical concerns related to the application of three health brand elements (functional (...)
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  3. Claire Badaracco (2007). The Ethics of Marketing Faith-Based Commodities. Journal of Information Ethics 16 (2):98-104.
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  4. John M. T. Balmer, Shaun M. Powell & Stephen A. Greyser (2011). Explicating Ethical Corporate Marketing. Insights From the BP Deepwater Horizon Catastrophe: The Ethical Brand That Exploded and Then Imploded. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 102 (1):1-14.
    Ethical corporate marketing—as an organisational-wide philosophy—transcends the domains of corporate social responsibility, business ethics, stakeholder theory and corporate marketing. This being said, ethical corporate marketing represents a logical development vis-a-vis the nascent domain of corporate marketing has an explicit ethical/CSR dimension and extends stakeholder theory by taking account of an institution’s past, present and (prospective) future stakeholders. In our article, we discuss, scrutinise and elaborate the notion of ethical corporate marketing. We argue that an ethical corporate marketing positioning is a (...)
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  5. Colin Boyd (2012). The Nestlé Infant Formula Controversy and a Strange Web of Subsequent Business Scandals. Journal of Business Ethics 106 (3):283-293.
    The marketing of infant formula in third-world countries in the 1970s by Nestlé S.A. gave rise to a consumer boycott that came to be a widely taught case study in the field of Business Ethics. This article extends that case study by identifying three specific individuals who were associated with managing Nestlé’s response to that boycott. It reveals their subsequent direct involvement in a number of additional “classic” 1980s business scandals (some of which ended with major criminal trials and the (...)
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  6. Vinicius Brei & Steffen Böhm (2011). Corporate Social Responsibility as Cultural Meaning Management: A Critique of the Marketing of 'Ethical' Bottled Water. Business Ethics 20 (3):233-252.
    To date, the primary focus of research in the field of corporate social responsibility (CSR) has been on the strategic implications of CSR for corporations and less on an evaluation of CSR from a wider political, economic and social perspective. In this paper, we aim to address this gap by critically engaging with marketing campaigns of so-called ‘ethical’ bottled water. We especially focus on a major CSR strategy of a range of different companies that promise to provide drinking water for (...)
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  7. George G. Brenkert (2008). Marketing Ethics. Blackwell Pub..
    Marketing Ethics addresses head-on the ethical questions, misunderstandings and challenges that marketing raises while defining marketing as a moral activity. A substantial introduction to the ethics of marketing, exploring the integral relations of marketing and morality Identifies and discusses a series of ethical tools and the marketing framework they constitute that are required for moral marketing Considers broader meanings and background assumptions of marketing infrequently included in other marketing literature Adds direction and meaning to problems in marketing ethics through reflection (...)
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  8. Katja H. Brunk (2012). Un/Ethical Company and Brand Perceptions: Conceptualising and Operationalising Consumer Meanings. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 111 (4):551-565.
    Based on three empirical studies, this research sets out to conceptualise and subsequently operationalise the construct of consumer perceived ethicality (CPE) of a company or brand. Study 1 investigates consumer meanings of the term ethical and reveals that, contrary to philosophical scholars' exclusively consequentialist or nonconsequentialist positions, consumers' ethical judgments are a function of both these evaluation principles, illustrating that not any one scholarly definition of ethics alone is capable of capturing the content domain. The resulting conceptualisation identifies six key (...)
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  9. Rutger J. G. Claassen (2009). Institutional Pluralism and the Limits of the Market. Politics, Philosophy and Economics 8 (4):420-447.
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  10. Jennifer Jackson (1990). Honesty in Marketing. Journal of Applied Philosophy 7 (1):51-60.
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  11. Jeanette Kennett & Steve Matthews (2008). What's the Buzz? Undercover Marketing and the Corruption of Friendship. Journal of Applied Philosophy 25 (1):2–18.
    Undercover marketing targets potential customers by concealing the commercial nature of an apparently social transaction. In a typical case an individual approaches a marketing target apparently to provide some information or advice about a product in a way that makes it seem like they are a fellow consumer. In another kind of case, a friend displays a product to you, and encourages its purchase, but fails to disclose their association with the marketing firm. We focus on this second type of (...)
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  12. Allan J. Kimmel (2001). Ethical Trends in Marketing and Psychological Research. Ethics and Behavior 11 (2):131 – 149.
    In contrast to the behavioral sciences, the nature and impact of ethical procedures such as informed consent and constraints on the use of deception have been addressed infrequently in the marketing discipline. This article describes an initial investigation into the methodological and ethical practices reported in published marketing research articles since the mid-1970s. Empirical articles appearing in the Journal of Marketing Research and the Journal of Consumer Research between 1975 and 1976, 1989 and 1990, and 1996 and 1997 were coded (...)
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  13. John Monberg (1997). "You Will": Social Implications of Advanced Marketing Technologies. Ethics and Behavior 7 (3):229 – 238.
    With the shift from a society dominated mass media toward a media landscape of targeted messages, mediated social relations are also transformed. This article addresses a civil society increasingly mediated by advanced marketing communication technologies, analyzing the democratic consequences of information flows constituting new forms of social interaction. It is suggestive to think of advanced marketing technologies not as discreet components and legal codes, but as representational technologies that allow the coordination of a variety of sophisticated knowledge specialties, and as (...)
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  14. David Palmer & Trevor Hedberg (2013). The Ethics of Marketing to Vulnerable Populations. Journal of Business Ethics 116 (2):403-413.
    An orthodox view in marketing ethics is that it is morally impermissible to market goods to specially vulnerable populations in ways that take advantage of their vulnerabilities. In his signature article “Marketing and the Vulnerable,” Brenkert (Bus Ethics Q Ruffin Ser 1:7–20, 1998) provided the first substantive defense of this position, one which has become a well-established view in marketing ethics. In what follows, we throw new light on marketing to the vulnerable by critically evaluating key components of Brenkert’s general (...)
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  15. Glenn Pearce & John Jackson (2005). Unethical Marketers in the “Hot Seat”. Journal of Business Ethics Education 2 (2):199-212.
    “Hot seating” is a form of creative drama in which the participants play themselves but imagine themselves in someone else’s position, some taking the role of interrogators and others the role of persons in the “hot seat”. This paper documents the case of marketing students who dramatised an ethics enquiry supposedly held under the auspices of a professional marketing association to investigate breaches in its code of professional conduct. Interpretive research, in the form of a cartoon test, was employed to (...)
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  16. Anne Pollock (2008). Pharmaceutical Meaning-Making Beyond Marketing: Racialized Subjects of Generic Thiazide. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 36 (3):530-536.
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  17. Jennifer L. Pomeranz (2010). Television Food Marketing to Children Revisited: The Federal Trade Commission Has the Constitutional and Statutory Authority to Regulate. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 38 (1):98-116.
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  18. Dirk Roep & Johannes Wiskerke (2012). On Governance, Embedding and Marketing: Reflections on the Construction of Alternative Sustainable Food Networks. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 25 (2):205-221.
    Based on the reconstruction of the development of 14 food supply chain initiatives in 7 European countries, we developed a conceptual framework that demonstrates that the process of increasing the sustainability of food supply chains is rooted in strategic choices regarding governance , embedding, and marketing and in the coordination of these three dimensions that are inextricably interrelated. The framework also shows that when seeking to further develop an initiative (e.g., through scaling up or product diversification) these interrelations need continuous (...)
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  19. Sunita Sah & Adriane Fugh‐Berman (2013). Physicians Under the Influence: Social Psychology and Industry Marketing Strategies. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 41 (3):665-672.
    Pharmaceutical and medical device companies apply social psychology to influence physicians' prescribing behavior and decision making. Physicians fail to recognize their vulnerability to commercial influences due to self-serving bias, rationalization, and cognitive dissonance. Professionalism offers little protection; even the most conscious and genuine commitment to ethical behavior cannot eliminate unintentional, subconscious bias. Six principles of influence — reciprocation, commitment, social proof, liking, authority, and scarcity — are key to the industry's routine marketing strategies, which rely on the illusion that the (...)
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  20. Juliet B. Schor & Margaret Ford (2007). From Tastes Great to Cool: Children's Food Marketing and the Rise of the Symbolic. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 35 (1):10-21.
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  21. Shlomo Sher (2011). A Framework for Assessing Immorally Manipulative Marketing Tactics. Journal of Business Ethics 102 (1):97-118.
    A longstanding debate exists in both academic literature and popular culture about whether non-informative marketing tactics are manipulative. However, given that we tend to believe that some marketing tactics are manipulative and some are not, the question that marketers, their critics, and consumers need to ask themselves is that of how to actually determine whether any particular marketing tactic is manipulative and whether a given manipulative tactic is, in fact, immoral. This article proposes to operationalize criteria that can be used (...)
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  22. M. Joseph Sirgy, Grace B. Yu, Dong-Jin Lee, Shuqin Wei & Ming-Wei Huang (2012). Does Marketing Activity Contribute to a Society's Well-Being? The Role of Economic Efficiency. Journal of Business Ethics 107 (2):91-102.
    Does the level of marketing activity in a country contribute to societal well-being or quality of life? Does economic efficiency also play a positive role in societal well-being? Does economic efficiency also moderate or mediate the marketing activity effect on societal well-being? Marketing activity refers to the pervasiveness of promotion expenditures and number of retail outlets per capita in a country. Economic efficiency refers to the extent to which the economy is unhampered by corruption, burdensome government regulation, and a large (...)
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  23. N. Craig Smith, Guido Palazzo & C. B. Bhattacharya (2010). Marketing's Consequences. Business Ethics Quarterly 20 (4):617-641.
    While considerable attention has been given to the harm done to consumers by marketing, less attention has been given to the harm done by consumers as an indirect effect of marketing activities, particularly in regard to supply chains. The recent development of dramatically expanded global supply chains has resulted in social and environmental problems upstream that are attributable at least in part to downstream marketers and consumers. Marketers have responded mainly by using corporate social responsibility (CSR) communication to counter the (...)
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  24. Joëlle Vanhamme, Adam Lindgreen, Jon Reast & Nathalie Popering (2012). To Do Well by Doing Good: Improving Corporate Image Through Cause-Related Marketing. Journal of Business Ethics 109 (3):259-274.
    As part of their corporate social responsibility, many organizations practice cause-related marketing, in which organizations donate to a chosen cause with every consumer purchase. The extant literature has identified the importance of the fit between the organization and the nature of the cause in influencing corporate image, as well as the influence of a connection between the cause and consumer preferences on brand attitudes and brand choice. However, prior research has not addressed which cause composition most appeals to consumers or (...)
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  25. Homer B. Warren, David J. Burns & James Tackett (2012). The Likelihood of Deception in Marketing. Business and Professional Ethics Journal 31 (1):109-134.
    Deception has been practiced by sellers since the beginning of the marketplace. Research in marketing ethics has established benchmarks and parameters forethical behavior that include honesty, full disclosure, equity, and fairness. Deception in marketing, however, has not received the same level of attention. This paper proposes to treat deception in marketing within the context of criminology. By examining deception in marketing within the context of criminology, additional insight can be gained into identifying its antecendents and the likelihood of its occurrence. (...)
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  26. Andy Wible (2011). It's All on Sale: Marketing Ethics and the Perpetually Fooled. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 99 (S1):17-21.
    Discussion of marketing deception has mostly focused on two main areas: first are cases that involve the intentional deception of people who tend to have compromised intelligence, such as children or the elderly, and second are cases that involve intentional falsehoods or the withholding of vital information, such as Madoff’s exploits. This article will differ from most in the field by examining marketing practices that are generally truthful, but deceive almost everyone. These practices do not fool just small select groups, (...)
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  27. John Williams & Robert Aitken (2011). The Service-Dominant Logic of Marketing and Marketing Ethics. Journal of Business Ethics 102 (3):439-454.
    Abela and Murphy (J Acad Mark Sci 36(1):39–53, 2007 ) examined Service-Dominant (S-D) logic (Vargo and Lusch, J Mark 68(1):1–17, 2004 ) from the viewpoint of Marketing Ethics and concluded that whilst S-D logic does not have explicit ethical content, the Foundational Premises (FPs) of S-D logic do have implicit ethical content. They also conclude that what may be needed to make the implicit more explicit is the addition of another FP. The aim of this article is to explore whether (...)
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Advertising Ethics
  1. G. J. M. Abbarno (2001). Huckstering in the Classroom: Limits to Corporate Social Responsibility. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 32 (2):179 - 189.
    The familiar issue of corporate social responsibility takes on a new topic. Added to the list of concerns from affirmative action and environmental integrity is their growing contributions to education. At first glance, the efforts may appear to be ordinary gestures of communal good will in terms of providing computers, sponsoring book covers, and interactive materials provided by Scholastic Magazine. A closer view reveals a targeted market of student life who are vulnerable to commercials placed in these formats. Among the (...)
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  2. Daniel Attas (1999). What's Wrong with "Deceptive" Advertising? Journal of Business Ethics 21 (1):49 - 59.
    In this paper I present a moral account of the legal notion of deceptive advertising. I argue that no harmful consequences to the consumer need follow from a deceptive advertisement as such, and I suggest instead that one should focus on the consequences of permitting the practise of deceptive advertising on society as a whole. After a brief account of deceptive advertising, I move to discuss the role of the reasonable person standard in its definition. One interpretation of this standard (...)
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  3. Adriana Ayers (2011). The Evolution of Kotex Advertising and the Introduction of the 'Negro Market'. Constellations 2 (2):52-65.
    Adriana Ayers studies the evolution of kotex advertising, focusing specifically on the way in which African American women were figured into changing advertisers’ conceptions of womanhood. The article analyzes images featured in various women’s magazines to examine how ideas surrounding menstruation were packaged and sold to women.
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  4. Janet Borgerson & Jonathan Schroeder (2002). Ethical Issues of Global Marketing: Avoiding Bad Faith in Visual Representation. European Journal of Marketing 36 (5/6):570-594.
    This paper examines visual representation from a distinctive, interdisciplinary perspective that draws on ethics, visual studies and critical race theory. Suggests ways to clarify complex issues of representational ethics in marketing communications and marketing representations, suggesting an analysis that makes identity creation central to societal marketing concerns. Analyzes representations of the exotic Other in disparate marketing campaigns, drawing upon tourist promotions, advertisements, and mundane objects in material culture. Moreover, music is an important force in marketing communication: visual representations in music (...)
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  5. Johannes Brinkmann (2002). Business and Marketing Ethics as Professional Ethics. Concepts, Approaches and Typologies. Journal of Business Ethics 41 (1-2):159 - 177.
    Marketing ethics is normally marketed as a sub-specialization of business ethics. In this paper, marketing ethics serves as an umbrella term for advertising, PR and sales ethics and as an example of professional ethics. To structure the paper, four approaches are distinguished, with a focus on typical professional conflicts, codes, roles or climates respectively. Since the moral climate approachis more inclusive than the other approaches, the last part of the paper deals mainly with moral climates, within the above-mentioned marketing sub-professions.
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  6. Carolyn Bronstein (2012). Advertising and the Corporate Conscience. Journal of Mass Media Ethics 27 (2):152 - 154.
    Journal of Mass Media Ethics, Volume 27, Issue 2, Page 152-154, April-June.
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  7. Betty B. Chaar & Johnson Lee (2012). Role of Socioeconomic Status on Consumers' Attitudes Towards DTCA of Prescription Medicines in Australia. Journal of Business Ethics 105 (4):447-460.
    The Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme, operating in Australia under the National Health Act 1953, provides citizens equal access to subsidised pharmaceuticals. With ever-increasing costs of medicines and global financial pressure on all commodities, the sustainability of the PBS is of crucial importance on many social and political fronts. Direct-to-consumer advertising (DTCA) of prescription medicines is fast expanding, as pharmaceutical companies recognise and reinforce marketing potentials not only in healthcare professionals but also in consumers. DTCA is currently prohibited in Australia, but pharmaceutical (...)
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  8. Moshe Cohen-Eliya & Yoav Hammer (2004). Advertisements, Stereotypes, and Freedom of Expression. Journal of Social Philosophy 35 (2):165–187.
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  9. J. Collins (1990). Television and Primary Schoolchildren in Northern Ireland 2. The Impact of Advertising. Journal of Moral Education 16 (1):31-39.
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  10. John Ellerbach (2004). The Advertorial as Information Pollution. Journal of Information Ethics 13 (1):61-75.
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  11. John D. Grad (1984). The Professional Advertiser: How Do We Draw the Line (If There Is a Line)? Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 12 (5):199-203.
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  12. Kenneth C. Herbst, Sean T. Hannah & David Allan (2013). Advertisement Disclaimer Speed and Corporate Social Responsibility: “Costs” to Consumer Comprehension and Effects on Brand Trust and Purchase Intention. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 117 (2):297-311.
    It is not uncommon for advertisers to present required product disclaimers quickly at the end of advertisements. We show that fast disclaimers greatly reduce consumer comprehension of product risks and benefits, creating implications for social responsibility. In addition, across two studies, we found that disclaimer speed and brand familiarity interact to predict brand trust and purchase intention, and that brand trust mediated the interactive effect of brand familiarity and disclaimer speed on purchase intention. Our results indicate that fast disclaimers actually (...)
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  13. James G. Hodge, Veda Collmer, Daniel G. Orenstein, Chase Millea & Laura Van Buren (2013). Reconsidering the Legality of Cigarette Smoking Advertisements on Television Public Health and the Law. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 41 (1):369-373.
    Television advertisements depicting the use of electronic cigarettes have recently exposed minors to images of smoking behaviors. While these advertisements are currently legal, existing laws should be interpreted or expanded to ban the commercial depiction of smoking behaviors with any product that resembles a cigarette to shield minors from potentially influential advertising.
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  14. Ker-Tah Hsu (2012). The Advertising Effects of Corporate Social Responsibility on Corporate Reputation and Brand Equity: Evidence From the Life Insurance Industry in Taiwan. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 109 (2):189-201.
    This study investigates the persuasive advertising and informative advertising effects of CSR initiatives on corporate reputation and brand equity based on the evidence from the life insurance industry in Taiwan. The study finds, first, policyholders’ perceptions concerning the CSR initiatives of life insurance companies have positive effects on customer satisfaction, corporate reputation, and brand equity. Second, the advertising effects of the CSR initiatives on corporate reputation are only informative. Third, the impacts of CSR initiatives on brand equity include informative advertising (...)
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  15. M. R. Hyman & R. B. Skipper (forthcoming). Advertising: Questioning Common Criticisms. Business Ethics.
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  16. Peter Lurie (2009). DTC Advertising Harms Patients and Should Be Tightly Regulated. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 37 (3):444-450.
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  17. Diego Rinallo, Suman Basuroy, Ruhai Wu & Hyo Jin Jeon (2013). The Media and Their Advertisers: Exploring Ethical Dilemmas in Product Coverage Decisions. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 114 (3):425-441.
    Marketers are increasingly relying on promotional practices (variously labeled as stealth marketing, hybrid messages, covert advertising) based on the diffusion of product information by third parties that appear to be independent of advertisers. In this paper, we examine to what extent the media treat their advertisers favorably, providing these advertisers’ products extra visibility in supposedly neutral editorial content. Empirically, we model the determinant of media coverage of Italian fashion products in an extended dataset of consumer magazines in Italy, France, Germany, (...)
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  18. Marc A. Rodwin (2010). Drug Advertising, Continuing Medical Education, and Physician Prescribing: A Historical Review and Reform Proposal. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 38 (4):807-815.
    Through the 1960s, many people claimed that drug advertising was educational and physicians often relied on it. Continuing Medical Education (CME) was developed to provide an alternative. However, because CME relied on grants, industry funders chose the subjects offered. Now policymakers worry that drug firms support CME to promote sales and that commercial support biases prescribing and fosters inappropriate drug use. A historical review reveals parallel problems between advertising and industry-funded CME. To preclude industry influence and improve CME, we should (...)
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  19. David Vladeck, Gerald Weber & Lawrence O. Gostin (2004). Commercial Speech and the Public's Health: Regulating Advertisements of Tobacco, Alcohol, High Fat Foods Potentially Hazardous and Other Products. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 32 (s4):32-34.
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  20. David S. Waller (2012). “Truth in Advertising”: The Beginning of Advertising Ethics in Australia. Journal of Mass Media Ethics 27 (1):46-56.
    In Australia, as in many countries, the early advertising industry had a poor reputation for honesty. However, in 1920 ?truth in advertising? and raising ethical behavior became the focus of the Second Convention of Advertising Men of Australasia, held in Sydney. This was a major event in Australia's advertising history and was seen as a way to legitimize the industry in the eyes of those who doubted advertising's honesty. This paper will look at the Sydney Advertising Convention, with particular reference (...)
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Consumer Ethics
  1. Pat Auger & Timothy M. Devinney (2007). Do What Consumers Say Matter? The Misalignment of Preferences with Unconstrained Ethical Intentions. Journal of Business Ethics 76 (4):361 - 383.
    Nearly all studies of consumers’ willingness to engage in ethical or socially responsible purchasing behavior is based on unconstrained survey response methods. In the present article we ask the question of how well does asking consumers the extent to which they care about a specific social or ethical issue relate to how they would behave in a more constrained environment where there is no socially acceptable response. The results of a comparison between traditional survey questions of “intention to purchase” and (...)
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  2. Pat Auger, Timothy M. Devinney & Jordan J. Louviere (2007). Using Best–Worst Scaling Methodology to Investigate Consumer Ethical Beliefs Across Countries. Journal of Business Ethics 70 (3):299 - 326.
    This study uses best–worst scaling experiments to examine differences across six countries in the attitudes of consumers towards social and ethical issues that included both product related issues (such as recycled packaging) and general social factors (such as human rights). The experiments were conducted using over 600 respondents from Germany, Spain, Turkey, USA, India, and Korea. The results show that there is indeed some variation in the attitudes towards social and ethical issues across these six countries. However, what is more (...)
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  3. Johannes Brinkmann (2005). Understanding Insurance Customer Dishonesty: Outline of a Situational Approach. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 61 (2):183 - 197.
    The paper takes a look at insurance customer dishonesty as a special case of consumer ethics, understood as a way of situation handling, as a moral choice between right and wrong, such as between self-interest vs. common-interest, in other words, a “moral temptation”. After briefly raising the question if different schools, of moral philosophy would conceptualize such moral temptations differently, the paper presents ‘moral psychology’ as a frame of reference, with a focus on cognitive moral development, moral attitude and moral (...)
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