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  1. Deborah Boyle (2007). Mary Astell: Theorist of Freedom From Domination - by Patricia Springborg. Philosophical Books 48 (4):359-360.
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  2. Jacqueline Broad (2002). Women Philosophers of the Seventeenth Century. Cambridge University Press.
    In this rich and detailed study of early modern women's thought, Jacqueline Broad explores the complexity of women's responses to Cartesian philosophy and its intellectual legacy in England and Europe. She examines the work of thinkers such as Mary Astell, Elisabeth of Bohemia, Margaret Cavendish, Anne Conway and Damaris Masham, who were active participants in the intellectual life of their time and were also the respected colleagues of philosophers such as Descartes, Leibniz and Locke. She also illuminates the continuities between (...)
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  3. Jacqueline Broad, Mary Astell's Machiavellian Moment? Politics and Feminism in Moderation Truly Stated.
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  4. Alice Browne (1988). The Celebrated Mary Astell: An Early English Feminist. History of European Ideas 9 (4):505-506.
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  5. Cynthia B. Bryson (1998). Mary Astell: Defender of the "Disembodied Mind". Hypatia 13 (4):40 - 62.
    This paper demonstrates how Mary Astell's version of Cartesian dualism supports her disavowal of female subordination and traditional gender roles, her rejection of Locke's notion of "thinking matter" as a major premise for rejecting his political philosophy of "social contracts" between men and women, and, finally, her claim that there is no intrinsic difference between genders in terms of ratiocination, the primary assertion that grants her the title of the first female English feminist.
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  6. Karen Detlefsen (forthcoming). Custom Freedom and Equality: Mary Astell on Marriage and Women's Education. Penn State University Press.
  7. Jane Duran (2006). Eight Women Philosophers: Theory, Politics, and Feminism. University of Illinois Press.
    Overviews -- Hildegard of Bingen -- Anne Conway -- Mary Astell -- Mary Wollstonecraft -- Harriet Taylor Mill -- Edith Stein -- Simone Weil -- Simone de Beauvoir -- Conclusions.
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  8. Jane Duran (2000). Mary Astell: A Pre-Humean Christian Empiricist and Feminist. In Cecile T. Tougas & Sara Ebenreck (eds.), Presenting Women Philosophers. Temple University Press.
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  9. Sarah Ellenzweig (2003). The Love of God and the Radical Enlightenment: Mary Astell's Brush with Spinoza. Journal of the History of Ideas 64 (3):379-397.
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  10. Karen Green, When is a Contract Theorist Not a Contract Theorist? Mary Astell and Catharine Macaulay as Critics of Thomas Hobbes.
  11. Alastair Hamilton (2010). Epicureanism at the Origins of Modernity. By Catherine Wilson and Letters Concerning the Love of God. By Mary Astell and John Norris. Edited by E. Derek Taylor and Melvyn New. [REVIEW] Heythrop Journal 51 (1):146-147.
  12. Jocelyn Harris (2012). Philosophy and Sexual Politics in Mary Astell and Samuel Richardson. Intellectual History Review 22 (3):445-463.
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  13. S. Hutton (1999). Mary Astell: Political Writings; Mary Wollstonecraft: A Vindication of the Rights of Men, A Vindication of the Rights of Women. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 7:176-177.
  14. A. Lister (2004). Marriage and Misogyny: The Place of Mary Astell in the History of Political Thought. History of Political Thought 25 (1):44-72.
  15. John McCrystal (1993). Revolting Women the Use of Revolutionary Discourse in Mary Astell and Mary Wollstonecraft Compared. History of Political Thought 14 (2):189-203.
  16. Joanne E. Myers (2013). Enthusiastic Improvement: Mary Astell and Damaris Masham on Sociability. Hypatia 28 (3):533-550.
    Many commentators have contrasted the way that sociability is theorized in the writings of Mary Astell and Damaris Masham, emphasizing the extent to which Masham is more interested in embodied, worldly existence. I argue, by contrast, that Astell's own interest in imagining a constitutively relational individual emerges once we pay attention to her use of religious texts and tropes. To explore the relevance of Astell's Christianity, I emphasize both how Astell's Christianity shapes her view of the individual's relation to society (...)
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  17. Regan Penaluna (2010). Mary Astell. The Philosophers' Magazine 51 (51):98-100.
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  18. Amy Schmitter (2013). Passions and Affections. In Peter R. Anstey (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of British Philosophy in the Seventeenth Century. Oxford University Press. 442-471.
  19. Alice Sowaal (2008). Mary Astell: Theorist of Freedom From Domination. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Philosophy 46 (2):322-323.
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  20. Alice Sowaal, Mary Astell. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  21. Alice Sowaal (2008). Mary Astell: Theorist of Freedom From Domination. Journal of the History of Philosophy 46 (2):pp. 322-323.
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  22. Alice Sowaal (2007). Mary Astell's Serious Proposal: Mind, Method, and Custom. Philosophy Compass 2 (2):227–243.
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  23. M. Sowal (forthcoming). Mary Astell. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  24. Patricia Springborg (2005). Mary Astell: Theorist of Freedom From Domination. Cambridge University Press.
    Philosopher, theologian, educational theorist, feminist and political pamphleteer, Mary Astell was an important figure in the history of ideas of the early modern period. Among the first systematic critics of John Locke's entire corpus, she is best known for the famous question which prefaces her Reflections on Marriage: 'If all men are born free, how is it that all women are born slaves?' She is claimed by modern Republican theorists and feminists alike but, as a Royalist High Church Tory, the (...)
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  25. Kathleen M. Squadrito (1987). Mary Astell's Critique of Locke's View of Thinking Matter. Journal of the History of Philosophy 25 (3):433-439.
  26. E. Derek Taylor (2006). Review of Patricia Springborg, Mary Astell: Theorist of Freedom From Domination. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2006 (11).
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  27. E. Derek Taylor (2001). Mary Astell's Ironic Assault on John Locke's Theory of Thinking Matter. Journal of the History of Ideas 62 (3):505-522.
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  28. Dr Connie Titone (2007). Pulling Back the Curtain: Relearning the History of the Philosophy of Education 1. Educational Studies 41 (2):128-147.
    Women have played an undeniable part in shaping the history of philosophy and philosophy of education for at least 1,000 years. Yet, current anthologies, encyclopedias, and textbooks in the field rarely recognize large numbers of women's works as consequential to our understanding of the development of educational topics and debates. This article, using the work of Herrad of Hohenbourg (1100s), Julian of Norwich (1342-c.1429), Christine de Pisan (c.1364-c.1430), and Mary Astell (1666-1731) traces women's early philosophical arguments concerning their own nature (...)
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  29. Penny A. Weiss (2004). Mary Astell: Including Women's Voices in Political Theory. Hypatia 19 (3):63-84.
  30. Catherine Wilson (2004). Love of God and Love of Creatures: The Masham-Astell Debate. History of Philosophy Quarterly 21 (3):281 - 298.