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Max Horkheimer

Edited by Chad Kautzer (University of Colorado at Denver)
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  1. John Abromeit (2013). Whiteness as a Form of Bourgeois Anthropology? Radical Philosophy Review 16 (1):325-343.
    In his pathbreaking analysis of the formation of an ideological “white” self-consciousness among American workers in the nineteenth century, David Roediger relies on a theoretical synthesis of historical materialism and psychoanalysis. This paper explores the parallels in methodology and content between Roediger’s work and the critical theory of Max Horkheimer, Erich Fromm, and Herbert Marcuse, which was also based on a synthesis of Marx and Freud. The paper seeks to place Roediger’s arguments in a broader theoretical context and to highlight (...)
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  2. John Abromeit (2011). Max Horkheimer and the Foundations of the Frankfurt School. Cambridge University Press.
    Machine generated contents note: Introduction; 1. Coming of age in Wilhelmine Germany; 2. Student years in Frankfurt ; 3. A materialist interpretation of the history of modern philosophy; 4. The beginnings of a critical theory of contemporary society; 5. Horkheimer's integration of psychoanalysis into his theory of contemporary society; 6. Horkheimer's concept of materialism in the early 1930s; 7. The anthropology of the bourgeois epoch; 8. Reflections on dialectical logic in the mid-1930s; Excursus I. The theoretical foundations of Horkheimer's split (...)
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  3. A. Allen (2014). Reason, Power and History: Re-Reading the Dialectic of Enlightenment. Thesis Eleven 120 (1):10-25.
    This paper re-examines the relationship between power, reason and history in Horkheimer and Adorno’s "Dialectic of Enlightenment." Contesting Habermas’ highly influential reading of the text, I argue that "Dialectic of Enlightenment," far from being a dead-end for critical theory, opens up important lines of thought in the philosophy of history that contemporary critical theorists would do well to recover. My focus is on the relationship that Horkheimer and Adorno trace between enlightenment rationality and the domination of inner and outer nature.
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  4. Matt Applegate (2013). Improvising the Future: Theory, Practice, and Struggle in Adorno and Horkheimer's Towards a New Manifesto. Telos: Critical Theory of the Contemporary 2013 (162):177-181.
    ExcerptA new manifesto for the radical Left is vital, and it is to emerge from whispers, riddles, and aphorisms without lapsing into dogma, pure utopia, or party politics. Its focus will be on practice and action, but will refuse to take command of the future. A new manifesto is, if it is to be all of these things at once, improvisation. These are a few of the basic features and premises of Adorno and Horkheimer's 1956 dialogue, posthumously titled, Towards a (...)
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  5. Darrell Arnold (2013). John Abromeit , Max Horkheimer and the Foundations of the Frankfurt School . Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 33 (2):93-95.
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  6. Jorge Ávila (2013). Max Horkheimer: Teoría tradicional y teoría crítica. La singularidad epistemológica para la transformación de la sociedad. Estudios de Filosofía 10:73-87.
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  7. Andreas Balog (1990). Society as an "Accidental Product of Human Activities." Max Horkheimer's Social Theory and Critique. Philosophy and Social Criticism 16 (2):127-141.
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  8. Sara Beardsworth (2005). Benjamin, Horkheimer, and Adorno. Idealistic Studies 35 (1):61-72.
    The paper considers what united and divided Benjamin and Horkheimer-Adorno in terms of their respective confrontations with the question of what it is to articulate the past historically. It presents their shared self-consciousness of the difficult task of responding critically to a problem conceived of as the entanglement of the concept of history with domination. For the problem imbues conceptualization itself and therefore threatens the value of the authoritative statements made in their own critical reflection on it. I show that (...)
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  9. Aaron Bell (2011). The Dialectic of Anthropocentrism. In John Sanbonmatsu (ed.), Critical Theory and Animal Liberation. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers 163--75.
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  10. J. C. Berendzen (2010). Suffering and Theory: Max Horkheimer's Early Essays and Contemporary Moral Philosophy. Philosophy and Social Criticism 36 (9):1019-1037.
    Max Horkheimer does not generally receive the scholarly attention given to other ‘Frankfurt School’ figures. This is in part because his early work seems contradictory, or unphilosophical. For example, Horkheimer seems, at various points (to use contemporary metaethical terms), like a constructivist, a moral realist, or a moral skeptic, and it is not clear how these views cohere. The goal of this article is to show that the contradictions regarding moral theory exist largely on the surface, and that one can (...)
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  11. J. C. Berendzen (2009). Max Horkheimer. Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association.
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  12. J. C. Berendzen (2008). Postmetaphysical Thinking or Refusal of Thought? Max Horkheimer's Materialism as Philosophical Stance. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 16 (5):695 – 718.
    Frankfurt School critical theory has long opposed metaphysical philosophy because it ignores suffering and injustice. In the face of such criticism, proponents of metaphysics (for example Dieter Henrich) have accused critical theory of not fully investigating the questions is raises for itself, and falling into partial metaphysical positions, despite itself. If one focuses on Max Horkheimer's early essays, such an accusation seems quite fitting. There he vociferously attacks metaphysics, but he also develops a theory that pushes toward metaphysical questions. His (...)
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  13. Jay M. Bernstein (1994). The Frankfurt School: Critical Assessments. Routledge.
  14. Stephan Bleier (1988). Horkheimer, Adorno, Foucault. Semiotics:573-577.
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  15. Stephen Eric Bronner & Douglas Kellner (eds.) (1989). Critical Theory and Society: A Reader. Routledge.
    A collection of seminal essays, many appearing in English for the first time, which provides an excellent overview of the critical theory developed by the Frankfurt School.
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  16. Hauke Brunkhorst (2000). Enlightenment of Rationality: Remarks on Horkheimer and Adorno's Dialectic of Enlightenment. Constellations 7 (1):133-140.
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  17. Matthew Crippen (2007). The Totalitarianism of Therapeutic Philosophy: Reading Wittgenstein Through Critical Theory. Essays in Philosophy 8 (1):3.
    [Excerpted From Editor's Introduction] Matthew Crippen takes this up in a Marcusian critique of Wittgenstein that attends, among other things, to the place of silence in that discourse. Referring to Horkheimer’s citation of the Latin aphorism that silence is consent, Crippen is critical of Wittgenstein’s admonition that we must pass over in silence those matters of which we cannot speak. This raises fascinating questions for critical theory that Crippen explores particularly with reference to Marcuse’s concept of one-dimensionality. To the extent (...)
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  18. Fred Dallmayr (1987). Reading Horkheimer Reading Vico. New Vico Studies 5:57-62.
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  19. Günter Figal (1983). Selbsterhaltung und Selbstverzicht. Zur Kritik der neuzeitlichen Subjektivität bei Max Horkheimer und Walter Benjamin. Zeitschrift für Philosophische Forschung 37 (2):161 - 179.
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  20. Dustin Garlitz (2014). Mass Media. In Andrew Scull (ed.), Cultural Sociology of Mental Illness: An A-to-Z Guide. Sage
  21. Dustin Garlitz & Hans-Herbert Kögler (2015). Frankfurt School: Institute for Social Research. In James D. Wright (ed.), International Encyclopedia of the Social and Behavioral Sciences (Second Edition). Elsevier
    The Institute for Social Research, or Frankfurt School, is an interdisciplinary research center associated with the University of Frankfurt in Germany and responsible for the founding and various trajectories of Critical Theory in the contemporary humanities and social sciences. Three generations of critical theorists have emerged from the Institute. The first generation was most prominently represented in the twentieth century by Max Horkheimer, Herbert Marcuse, Theodor W. Adorno, Walter Benjamin, Leo Löwenthal, and also for some time Erich Fromm. The so-called (...)
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  22. Gianluca Giachery (2012). Indignazione Morale E Profezia Pedagogica: L'Ultimo Horkheimer. Ibis.
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  23. Ilan Gur-Ze'ev (1999). Walter Benjamin and Max Horkheimer: From Utopia to Redemption. Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy 8 (1):119-155.
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  24. Ilan Gur-Ze’Ev (2005). Adorno and Horkheimer: Diasporic Philosophy, Negative Theology, and Counter-Education. Educational Theory 55 (3):343-365.
    From a contemporary perspective, the work of the Frankfurt School thinkers can be considered the last grand modern attempt to offer transcendence, meaning, and religiosity rather than “emancipation” and “truth.” In the very first stage of their work, Adorno and Horkheimer interlaced the goals of Critical Theory with the Marxian revolutionary project. The development of their thought led them to criticize orthodox Marxism and ended in a complete break with that tradition, as they developed a quest for a unique kind (...)
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  25. Clodie Hamel (2010). L'odyssée d'Adorno Et Horkheimer. Ollendorff & Desseins.
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  26. David Held (1980). Introduction to Critical Theory: Horkheimer to Habermas. University of California Press.
    2. Class,. class. conflict. and. the. development. of. capitalism: critical. theory. and. political. economy. In the last ten years the work of the best- known representatives of the Frankfurt school has come to be associated with two basic concerns: ...
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  27. M. Horkheimer (1964). Theism and Atheism. Diogenes 12 (48):39-52.
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  28. M. Horkheimer & V. A. Velen (1966). On the Concept of Freedom. Diogenes 14 (53):73-81.
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  29. Max Horkheimer (2011). Odpowiedzialność i studia. Kronos 2 (2).
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  30. Max Horkheimer (2007). Tęsknota za całkowicie Innym . Rozmowa z Helmutem Gumniorem (1970). Kronos 1 (1):13-27.
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  31. Max Horkheimer (2004). Eclipse of Reason. Continuum.
    In this book, Horkheimer surveys and demonstrates the gradual ascendancy of Reason in Western philosophy, its eventual total application to all spheres of life, ...
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  32. Max Horkheimer (2002). Dialectic of Enlightenment: Philosophical Fragments. Stanford University Press.
    Dialectic of Enlightenment is undoubtedly the most influential publication of the Frankfurt School of Critical Theory. Written during the Second World War and circulated privately, it appeared in a printed edition in Amsterdam in 1947. "What we had set out to do," the authors write in the Preface, "was nothing less than to explain why humanity, instead of entering a truly human state, is sinking into a new kind of barbarism." Yet the work goes far beyond a mere critique of (...)
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  33. Max Horkheimer (1987). Vico and Mythology. New Vico Studies 5:63-76.
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  34. Max Horkheimer (1983). List Do S. Fischer Verlag. Colloquia Communia 7 (2):71-74.
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  35. Max Horkheimer (1983). Teoria tradycyjna a teoria krytyczna. Colloquia Communia 7 (2):39-64.
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  36. Max Horkheimer (1983). Uzupełnienie. Colloquia Communia 7 (2):65-70.
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  37. Max Horkheimer (1974). Critique of Instrumental Reason: Lectures and Essays Since the End of World War Ii. Continuum.
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  38. Max Horkheimer (1974). Critique of Instrumental Reason. New York,Seabury Press.
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  39. Max Horkheimer (1973). Dialectic of Enlightenment. Allen Lane.
    This is a new, improved translation of the most influential publication of the Frankfurt School of Critical Theory.
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  40. Max Horkheimer (1972). Critical Theory: Selected Essays. Continuum Pub. Corp..
    These essays, written in the 1930s and 1940s, represent a first selection in English from the major work of the founder of the famous institute for Social ...
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  41. Max Horkheimer (1932-1941). Zeitscrift für Sozialforschung (1932-1941). In Zeitscrift für Sozialforschung. Alcan
    All nine volumes of the Institute's journal are available as PDFs here: http://raumgegenzement.blogsport.de/2012/02/05/zeitschrift-fuer-sozialforschung-1932-1941/.
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  42. Martin Jay (1973). Max Horkheimer (1895-1973). Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association 47:219 - 220.
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  43. Martin Jay (1973). The Dialectical Imagination: A History of the Frankfurt School and the Institute of Social Research, 1923-1950. University of California Press.
    Martin Jay has provided a substantial new preface for this edition, in which he reflects on the continuing relevance of the work of the Frankfurt School.
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  44. John F. Kavanaugh (1975). "The Dialectical Imagination: A History of the Frankfurt School and the Institute of Social Research 1923-1950," by Martin Jay; "Critical Theory," by Max Horkheimer; "Dialectic of Enlightenment," by Max Horkheimer and Theodor W. Adomo; "Negative Dialectics," by Theodor W. Adorno; "The Jargon of Authenticity," by Theodor W. Adorno; and "The Critique of Domination," by Trent Schroyer. [REVIEW] Modern Schoolman 52 (4):427-432.
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  45. Alfredo Lucero-Montano (2006). Horkheimer and Adorno's Dialectic of Enlightenment. Philosophy Pathways 114.
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  46. J. D. Mabbott (1948). Eclipse of Reason. By Max Horkheimer, Director of the Institute of Social Research, Columbia University. (New York: Oxford University Press. 1947. Pp. 187. Price $2.75. [16s.]. [REVIEW] Philosophy 23 (87):368-.
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  47. A. Marinopoulou (2008). The Concept of the Political in Max Horkheimer and Jurgen Habermas. Nissos Academic Pub..
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  48. Anastasia Marinopoulou (2007). Some Social Perspectives of the Notions of the Political and Politics in Max Horkheimer and Jürgen Habermas. Philosophical Inquiry 29 (1-2):112-131.
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  49. Raymond A. Morrow (1995). Benhabib, Seyla, Wolfgang Bonß, and John Mccole, Eds., On Max Horkheimer: New Perspectives. MIT Press, Cambridge, Ma, 1993. Pp. 533. $40.00. Horkheimer, Max. Between Philosophy and Social Science: Selected Early Writings. Translated by G. Frederick Hunter, Matthew S. Kramer, and John Torpey. MIT Press, Cambridge, Ma, 1993. Pp. 460. $40.00. [REVIEW] Philosophy of the Social Sciences 25 (4):479-484.
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  50. Glenn Negley (1947). Book Review:Eclipse of Reason. Max Horkheimer. [REVIEW] Ethics 58 (1):75-.
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