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  1. Wolfgang Bartuschat (1977). Max Scheler in Present-Day Philosophy. Philosophy and History 10 (2):147-148.
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  2. Howard Becker & Helmut Otto Dahlke (1942). Max Scheler's Sociology of Knowledge. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 2 (3):310-322.
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  3. Robert Bernasconi (1984). Transcendence and the Overcoming of Values: Heidegger's Critique of Scheler. Research in Phenomenology 14 (1):259-267.
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  4. Philip Blosser (2005). The “Cape Horn” of Scheler's Ethics. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 79 (1):121-143.
    I dispute Scheler’s view that good and evil cannot be willed as such; that moral value is always an inevitable and indirect by-product of willing other ends; that every act of willing yields a moral value; and that moral value attaches only to persons. I argue that moral value attaches to a variety of objects of willing (including one’s own moral worth), and that, although all acts have moral implications, not all acts are typologically moral. Those that are, I suggest, (...)
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  5. Martin Buber (1945). The Philosophical Anthropology of Max Scheler. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 6 (2):307-321.
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  6. Mary Evelyn Clarke (1934). The Contribution of Max Scheler to the Philosophy of Religion. Philosophical Review 43 (6):577-597.
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  7. Peter J. Colosi (2009). John Paul II and Max Scheler on the Meaning of Suffering. Logos 12 (3).
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  8. Stanley B. Cunningham (1966). Max Scheler. A Concise Introduction Into the World of a Great Thinker. By Manfred S. Frings. Pittsburgh: Duquesne University Press. 1965. Pp. 223. $6.50. [REVIEW] Dialogue 5 (03):450-452.
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  9. Helmut Dahm (1975). Vladimir Solovyev and Max Scheler: Attempt at a Comparative Interpretation: A Contribution to the History of Phenomenology. Reidel.
    THE IDEA OF PHILOSOPHY The duality of human life and consciousness is the actual ground* of all reflection and philosophy. Man finds in himself the feeling ...
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  10. Zachary Davis (2009). A Phenomenology of Political Apathy: Scheler on the Origins of Mass Violence. [REVIEW] Continental Philosophy Review 42 (2):149-169.
    In his criticisms of the German youth movement and the emergence of fascism across Europe during the early 1920s, Max Scheler draws a distinction between the different senses of political apathy that give rise to mass political movements. Recent studies of mass apathy have tended to treat all forms of apathy as the same and as a consequence reduced the diverse expressions of mass violence to the same, stripping mass movements of any critical function. I show in this paper that (...)
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  11. K. Dixon (1984). Book Reviews : Problems of a Sociology of Knowledge. By Max Scheler. Translated by Manfred S. Fiungs. Edited and with an Introduction by Kenneth W. Stikkers. London: Routledge and Kegan Paul, 1980. Pp. 328. $25.00. Class Structure and Knowledge. By Nicholas Abercrombie. Oxford: Basil Blackwell, 1980. Pp. 208. 15.00 (Hardbound), 5.50 (Paper. [REVIEW] Philosophy of the Social Sciences 14 (2):263-265.
  12. John J. Drummond (2005). Personalism and the Metaphysical. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 79 (1):203-212.
    This article is a review of the recently published book Max Scheler’s Acting Persons, edited by Stephen Schneck. It considers some issues regarding the relation between Scheler’s phenomenological personalism and his later metaphysics by way of a discussion of the articles contained in this volume. The review explores the various and varied discussions of the relation between Scheler’s phenomenological notions of person and spirit. It suggests that Scheler’s turn from a phenomenological anthropology to metaphysics has its roots not only in (...)
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  13. Parvis Emad (1972). Max Scheler's Notion of the Process of Phenomenology. Southern Journal of Philosophy 10 (1):7-16.
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  14. Marvin Farber (1954). Max Scheler on the Place of Man in the Cosmos. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 14 (3):393-399.
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  15. Manfred Frings (1986). Max Scheler. Philosophy and Theology 1 (1):49-63.
    The central theme is a hitherto unknown explanation of the “temporality” of the person as proposed by the late Max Scheler. The first part deals with the meaning of “absolute time” in general. The second part shows how the temporality of the person is to be seen as “absolute” time on the basis of two opposing principles in man: the “life-center” or impulsion, and “mind” which, without the former, remains powerless, but conjoined with it “become” personal in absolute time.
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  16. Manfred Frings (1977). Nothingness and Being a Schelerian Comment. Research in Phenomenology 7 (1):182-189.
    Heidegger's central question, "What is the meaning of Being?", is intertwined with the concept of nothingness, as it has been since Pre-Socratic thought. I wish to articulate "nothingness" by restricting myself to three aspects of this concept given by Scheler: 1.) the meanings with which the word "nothing" is used, 2.) the moral implication belonging to the question of "nothing," and 3.) the concept of reality. It is the purpose of this selection of Schelerian thought to furnish some distinctions to (...)
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  17. Manfred Frings (1968). Heidegger And Scheler. Philosophy Today 12 (1):21-30.
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  18. Manfred S. Frings (2002). A Novel Look at the Structure of the Pragmatic View of the World: Max Scheler. In Leo V. Ryan, F. Byron Nahser & Wojciech Gasparski (eds.), Praxiology and Pragmatism. Transaction Publishers. 10--107.
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  19. Manfred S. Frings (1996). Max Scheler: A Concise Introduction Into the World of a Great Thinker. Marquette University Press.
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  20. Manfred S. Frings (1992). Max Scheler. Philosophy and Theology 6 (3):49-63.
    The central theme is a hitherto unknown explanation of the “temporality” of the person as proposed by the late Max Scheler. The first part deals with the meaning of “absolute time” in general. The second part shows how the temporality of the person is to be seen as “absolute” time on the basis of two opposing principles in man: the “life-center” or impulsion, and “mind” which, without the former, remains powerless, but conjoined with it “become” personal in absolute time.
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  21. Manfred S. Frings (1965). Max Scheler. Pittsburgh, Duquesne University Press.
    The central theme is a hitherto unknown explanation of the “temporality” of the person as proposed by the late Max Scheler. The first part deals with the meaning of “absolute time” in general. The second part shows how the temporality of the person is to be seen as “absolute” time on the basis of two opposing principles in man: the “life-center” or impulsion, and “mind” which, without the former, remains powerless, but conjoined with it “become” personal in absolute time.
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  22. Rodolphe Gasché (2010). A Material a Priori? On Max Scheler's Critique of Kant's Formal Ethics. Philosophical Forum 41 (1):113-126.
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  23. Leon J. Goldstein (1963). Book Review:Man's Place in Nature Max Scheler, Hans Meyerhoff; Ressentiment Max Scheler, Lewis Coser, William W. Holdheim. [REVIEW] Philosophy of Science 30 (3):292-.
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  24. Charles Hartshorne (1934). Book Review:Max Schelers Phanomenologische Systematik: Mit Einer Monographischen Bibliographie Max Scheler. Gerhard Kraenzlin; Der Verstandene Tod: Eine Untersuchung zu Martin Heideggers Existenzialontologie. Adolph Sternberger. [REVIEW] Ethics 44 (4):478-.
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  25. Peter Hebblethwaite (1986). Husserl, Scheler and Wojtyca: A Tale of Three Philosophers. Heythrop Journal 27 (4):441–445.
  26. Rainier R. A. Ibana (1991). The Stratification of Emotional Life and the Problem of Other Minds According to Max Scheler. International Philosophical Quarterly 31 (4):461-471.
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  27. Eugene Kelly (2011). Material Ethics of Value: Max Scheler and Nicolai Hartmann. Springer.
    This volume demonstrates that their contributions to a material ethics of value are complementary: by supplementing the work of one with that of the other, we obtain a comprehensive and defensible axiological and moral theory.
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  28. Eugene Kelly (2008). Material Value-Ethics: Max Scheler and Nicolai Hartmann. Philosophy Compass 3 (1):1-16.
  29. Eugene Kelly (2005). A Postscript to Max Scheler's “On the Rehabilitation of Virtue”. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 79 (1):39-43.
    The translator of Scheler’s essay, “On the Rehabilitation of Virtue,” presents an account of the context of this essay in Scheler’s work and of its relevance to his concept of the ordo amoris and to his critique of Kant. The translator discusses the intended audience of the essay, its moral purpose, and the method of its procedure. The postscript further reflects on the essay’s central themes of humility and reverence, suggesting avenues for a critical assessment of Scheler’s conclusions. It ends (...)
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  30. Eugene Kelly (1997). Revisiting Max Scheler's Formalism in Ethics: Virtue-Based Ethics and Moral Rules in the Non-Formal Ethics of Value. [REVIEW] Journal of Value Inquiry 31 (3):381-397.
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  31. Michelle Kosch (2010). Gasché on Scheler. Philosophical Forum 41 (1):127-130.
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  32. Quentin Lauer (1961). The Phenomenological Ethics of Max Scheler. International Philosophical Quarterly 1 (2):273-300.
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  33. Janko M. Lozar (2009). Attunement in the Modern Age. Human Studies 32 (1):19 - 31.
    This contribution starts from Max Scheler’s claim that modern philosophy holds two differing views on feelings. The first view, which Scheler attributes to René Descartes, presents them in their intentional role but rejects their independence; the other view, which Scheler attributes to Immanuel Kant, holds that they cannot be reduced to the rational part of the soul and thus affirms their independence, but deprives them of all cognitive powers. After considering both views, I discuss the views of Franz Brentano and (...)
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  34. Gabriel Mahéo (2005). La question de l'amour chez Max Scheler: par-delà l'activité et la passivité? Bulletin d'Analyse Phénoménologique 1 (1).
    L?entreprise philosophique de Scheler se présente comme une application de la phénoménologie des Recherches logiques au domaine des valeurs, et procède pour cela à une transposition de l?objectivisme séman­tique husserlien en un objectivisme axiologique. C?est pourquoi, au premier abord, le statut de la passivité ne semble pas poser problème dans la phénoménologie de Scheler, tant ce dernier insiste sur l?objectivité, l?absolui­té et l?indépendance des valeurs qui ne peuvent être, comme l?affirme le Formalisme, « ni créées, ni détruites », mais « (...)
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  35. Olivier Massin (2011). Résistance Et Existence [Resistence and Existence]. Etudes de Philosophie 9:275- 310.
    I defend the view that the experience of resistance gives us a direct phenomenal access to the mind-independence of perceptual objects. In the first part, I address a humean objection against the very possibility of experiencing existential mind-independence. The possibility of an experience of mind-independence being secured, I argue in the second part that the experience of resistance is the only kind of experience by which we directly access existential mind-independence.
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  36. Thomas Mcpherson (1963). On the Eternal in Man. By Scheler Max. (London, S.C.M. Press, 1960. Pp. 480. Price 63s.). Philosophy 38 (145):284-.
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  37. Joshua Miller (2005). Scheler on the Twofold Source of Personal Uniqueness. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 79 (1):163-181.
    There is a latent distinction in Scheler’s middle-period philosophical anthropology between personal uniqueness as divinely determined and as self-determined. The first dimension is more explicit; the second, a logical conclusion from Scheler’s notion of person as pure spirit. In the following study I will first thematize these two aspects of personal uniqueness. Then, I will explore Scheler’sidea that one gains knowledge of these aspects of a person through love. Here Scheler’s differentiation between love as intuitive and love as participative serves (...)
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  38. Joshua Miller (2005). The Writings of Max Scheler. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 79 (1):13-19.
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  39. Christoph Moonen (2005). Immediacy and Incarnation. Bijdragen 66 (4):402-414.
  40. Enrique Muñoz (2012). Fuentes fenomenológicas de la noción de persona: su discusión en Husserl, Scheler y Heidegger. Areté. Revista de Filosofía 24 (1):91-108.
    “Phenomenological Sources for the Concept of Person: their Discussion in the Works of Husserl, Scheler and Heidegger”. The article sets out to reconstruct the arguments that are developed by Heidegger on the concept of the person in some passages of § 10 of Being and Time . In those brief passages, Heidegger comments positively on the concept of the person as elucidated by Husserl and Scheler in the framework of the phenomenological movement. Consequently, in the article, I focus on identifying (...)
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  41. Luke Penkett (2010). The Constitution of the Human Being. By Max Scheler, Translated by John Cutting. Heythrop Journal 51 (3):514-515.
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  42. Ron Perrin (1991). Max Scheler's Concept of the Person: An Ethics of Humanism. St. Martin's Press.
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  43. Joel M. Potter (2012). Arguments From the Priority of Feeling From Contemporary Emotion Theory and Max Scheler's Phenomenology. Quaestiones Disputatae 3 (1):215-225.
    Many so-called “cognitivist” theories of the emotions account for the meaningfulness of emotions in terms of beliefs or judgments that are associated or identified with these emotions. In recent years, a number of analytic philosophers have argued against these theories by pointing out that the objects of emotions are sometimes meaningfully experienced before one can take a reflective stance toward them. Peter Goldie defends this point of view in his book The Emotions: A Philosophical Exploration. Goldie argues that emotions are (...)
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  44. Tapio Puolimatka (2008). Max Scheler and the Idea of a Well Rounded Education. Educational Philosophy and Theory 40 (3):362–382.
    The German philosopher Max Scheler defines the human person as a value-oriented act structure. Since a person is ideally a free being with open possibilities, the aim of education is to help human beings develop their potential in various directions. At the centre of Scheler's educational philosophy is the idea of all-round education, which aims towards a developed capacity for assessment, an ability to make choices and an ability to focus on the objective nature of things.
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  45. Ernest W. Ranly (1967). Scheler's Phenomenology of Community. The Hague, Martinus Nijhoff.
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  46. Juan Sebastián Ballén Rodríguez (2010). Aproximación a la antropología fenomenológica en Max Scheler. Logos 17:87-105.
    Being located in the horizon of the philosophical outrage, our article purpose is to show the phenomenological basis of Max Scheler’s anthropological proposal, whose immediate antecedents were Husserl’s researches regarding to the correlation man-world, the debate held between phenomenology and the incursion of psychology within the field of the objectives sciences, the develop of a growing up discipline such as physiology, and in general the gradual consolidation of evolutionary theories, which were taking from the philosophical anthropology his conceit of prevailing (...)
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  47. Jonathan J. Sanford (2005). Scheler Versus Scheler. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 79 (1):145-161.
    Scheler’s theory of the person is at the center of his philosophy and one of the most celebrated of his achievements. It is somewhat surprising, then, that a straightforward and sufficient account of the person is missing from his works, an omission felt most keenly in that work which is in large measure dedicated to forging a new personalism: The Formalism in Ethics and Non-Formal Ethics of Values. In his explicit accounts of what a person is, Scheler stresses its spirituality (...)
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  48. Max Scheler (2009). The Human Place in the Cosmos. Northwestern University Press.
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  49. Max Scheler (2005). On the Rehabilitation of Virtue. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 79 (1):21-37.
    Max Scheler’s essay on virtue, first published under a pseudonym in 1913, begins with some reflection upon the decline in his era of a concern for virtue. Its central theme is a phenomenological exhibition of the Christian experience of humility, reverence, and related concepts, together with an exploration of their historical and social embodiments in Western culture. The core of humility is a spiritual readiness to serve, related to love, that produces in its possessor a liberation from the ego. The (...)
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  50. Max Scheler (1994). Ressentiment. Marquette University Press.
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