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Medical Ethics, Misc

Edited by Ruchika Mishra (Program in Medicine and Human Values, California Pacific Medical Center)
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  1. M. A. Sanchez-Gonzalez, B. Herreros, V. R. Ramnath, M. D. Martin, E. Pintor & L. Bishop (2014). Clinical Ethics Protocols in the Clinical Ethics Committees of Madrid. Journal of Medical Ethics 40 (3):205-208.
    Introduction Currently, The nature and scope of Clinical Ethics Protocols in Madrid are not well understood.Objectives The main objective is to describe the features of ‘guideline/recommendation’ type CEPs that have been or are being developed by existing Clinical Ethics Committees in Madrid. Secondary objectives include characterisation of those CECs that have been the most prolific in reference to CEP creation and implementation and identification of any trends in future CEP development.Methods We collected CEPs produced and in process by CECs accredited (...)
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  2. D. A. (1998). The Limits of Individuality: Ritual and Sacrifice in the Lives and Medical Treatment of Conjoined Twins. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 29 (1):1-29.
  3. Lise Aagaard (2014). Chemical Castration of Danish Sex Offenders. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 11 (2):117-118.
    Surgical castration of sex offenders has been used in several countries to prevent sexual recidivism and is still practiced in several states in the United States. In Europe, it has remained in limited use in Germany and in the Czech Republic (Douglas et al. 2013). Since the 1960s, most jurisdictions have replaced irreversible surgical castration of sex offenders with reversible chemical castration with anti-androgen drugs. In Denmark, use of surgical castration was stopped in 1970, and since the late 1980s, serious (...)
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  4. M. Aase, J. E. Nordrehaug & K. Malterud (2008). "If You Cannot Tolerate That Risk, You Should Never Become a Physician": A Qualitative Study About Existential Experiences Among Physicians. Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (11):767-771.
    Background and objectives: Physicians are exposed to matters of existential character at work, but little is known about the personal impact of such issues. Methods: To explore how physicians experience and cope with existential aspects of their clinical work and how such experiences affect their professional identities, a qualitative study using individual semistructured interviews has analysed accounts of their experiences related to coping with such challenges. Analysis was by systematic text condensation. The purposeful sample comprised 10 physicians (including three women), (...)
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  5. M. Aase, J. E. Nordrehaug & K. Malterud (2008). “If You Cannot Tolerate That Risk, You Should Never Become a Physician”: A Qualitative Study About Existential Experiences Among Physicians. Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (11):767-771.
    Background and objectives: Physicians are exposed to matters of existential character at work, but little is known about the personal impact of such issues.Methods: To explore how physicians experience and cope with existential aspects of their clinical work and how such experiences affect their professional identities, a qualitative study using individual semistructured interviews has analysed accounts of their experiences related to coping with such challenges. Analysis was by systematic text condensation. The purposeful sample comprised 10 physicians , aged 33–66 years, (...)
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  6. Elmer D. Abbo & Angelo E. Volandes (2006). Rare but Routine: The Physician's Obligation to Protect Third Parties. American Journal of Bioethics 6 (2):34 – 36.
  7. H. E. Abdulhameed, M. M. Hammami & E. A. Hameed Mohamed (2011). Disclosure of Terminal Illness to Patients and Families: Diversity of Governing Codes in 14 Islamic Countries. Journal of Medical Ethics 37 (8):472-475.
    Background The consistency of codes governing disclosure of terminal illness to patients and families in Islamic countries has not been studied until now. Objectives To review available codes on disclosure of terminal illness in Islamic countries. Data source and extraction Data were extracted through searches on Google and PubMed. Codes related to disclosure of terminal illness to patients or families were abstracted, and then classified independently by the three authors. Data synthesis Codes for 14 Islamic countries were located. Five codes (...)
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  8. Hunida E. Abdulhameed, Muhammad M. Hammami & Elbushra A. Hameed Mohamed (2011). Disclosure of Terminal Illness to Patients and Families: Diversity of Governing Codes in 14 Islamic Countries. Journal of Medical Ethics 37 (8):472-475.
  9. Khalil Abdur-Rashid, Steven Woodward Furber & Taha Abdul-Basser (2013). Lifting the Veil: A Typological Survey of the Methodological Features of Islamic Ethical Reasoning on Biomedical Issues. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 34 (2):81-93.
    We survey the meta-ethical tools and institutional processes that traditional Islamic ethicists apply when deliberating on bioethical issues. We present a typology of these methodological elements, giving particular attention to the meta-ethical techniques and devices that traditional Islamic ethicists employ in the absence of decisive or univocal authoritative texts or in the absence of established transmitted cases. In describing how traditional Islamic ethicists work, we demonstrate that these experts possess a variety of discursive tools. We find that the ethical responsa—i.e., (...)
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  10. Tineke A. Abma (2005). Struggling with the Fragility of Life: A Relational-Narrative Approach to Ethics in Palliative Nursing. Nursing Ethics 12 (4):337-348.
    In nursing ethics the role of narratives and dialogue has become more prominent in recent years. The purpose of this article is to illuminate a relational-narrative approach to ethics in the context of palliative nursing. The case study presented concerns a difficult relationship between oncology nurses and a husband whose wife was hospitalized with cancer. The husband’s narrative is an expression of depression, social isolation and the loss of hope. He found no meaning in the process of dying and death. (...)
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  11. Tineke A. Abma (2001). Evaluating Palliative Care: Facilitating Reflexive Dialgoues About an Ambiguous Concept. [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 4 (3):261-276.
    Palliation is a relatively new concept that is used in connection with the integral care provided to those who are unable to recover from their illness. The specific meaning of the concept has not been clearly defined. This article explores the possibilities offered by a responsive approach to evaluation that can facilitate a reflexive dialogue on this ambiguous concept. In doing so it draws on a case study of a palliative care project in a Dutch health care authority. The article (...)
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  12. Tineke A. Abma, Vivianne E. Baur, Bert Molewijk & Guy A. M. Widdershoven (2010). Inter-Ethics: Towards an Interactive and Interdependent Bioethics. Bioethics 24 (5):242-255.
    Since its origin bioethics has been a specialized, academic discipline, focussing on moral issues, using a vast set of globalized principles and rational techniques to evaluate and guide healthcare practices. With the emergence of a plural society, the loss of faith in experts and authorities and the decline of overarching grand narratives and shared moralities, a new approach to bioethics is needed. This approach implies a shift from an external critique of practices towards embedded ethics and interactive practice improvement, and (...)
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  13. Tineke A. Abma & Guy Am Widdershoven (2006). Moral Deliberation in Psychiatric Nursing Practice. Nursing Ethics 13 (5):546-557.
    Moral deliberation has been receiving more attention in nursing ethics. Several ethical conversation models have been developed. This article explores the feasibility of the so-called CARE (Considerations, Actions, Reasons, Experiences) model as a framework for moral deliberation in psychiatric nursing practice. This model was used in combination with narrative and dialogical approaches to foster discourse between various stakeholders about coercion in a closed admission clinic in a mental hospital in the Netherlands. The findings demonstrate that the CARE model provides a (...)
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  14. A. Abou-Zeid, H. Silverman, M. Shehata, M. Shams, M. Elshabrawy, T. Hifnawy, S. A. Rahman, B. Galal, H. Sleem, N. Mikhail & N. Moharram (2010). Collection, Storage and Use of Blood Samples for Future Research: Views of Egyptian Patients Expressed in a Cross-Sectional Survey. Journal of Medical Ethics 36 (9):539-547.
    Objective To determine the attitudes of Egyptian patients regarding their participation in research and with the collection, storage and future use of blood samples for research purposes. Design Cross-sectional survey. Study population Adult Egyptian patients (n=600) at rural and urban hospitals and clinics. Results Less than half of the study population (44.3%) felt that informed consent forms should provide research participants the option to have their blood samples stored for future research. Of these participants, 39.9% thought that consent forms should (...)
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  15. Halpern Abraham, Halpern John & Doherty Sean (2008). " Enhanced" Interrogation of Detainees: Do Psychologists and Psychiatrists Participate? Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 3.
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  16. Henry Abramovitch & Eliezer Schwartz (1996). Three Stages of Medical Dialogue. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 17 (2).
    The negative consequences of physicians' failure to establish and maintain personal relationships with patients are at the heart of the humanistic crisis in medicine. To resolve this crisis, a new model of doctor-patient interaction is proposed, based on the ideas of Martin Buber's philosophy of dialogue. This model shows how the physican may successfully combine the personal (I-Thou) and impersonal (I-It) aspects of medicine in three stages. These Three Stages of Medical Dialogue include:1. An Initial Personal Meeting stage, which initiates (...)
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  17. Terrence F. Ackerman (1989). A Casebook of Medical Ethics. Oxford University Press.
    Should a brain-dead woman be artificially maintained for the sake of her fetus? Does a physician have the right to administer a life-saving transfusion despite the patient's religious beliefs? Can a family request a hysterectomy for their retarded daughter? Physicians are facing moral dilemmas with increasing frequency. But how should these delicate questions be resolved and by whom? A Casebook of Medical Ethics offers a real-life view of the central issue involved in clinical medical ethics. Since the analysis of cases (...)
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  18. George J. Agich (1981). The Foundation of Medical Ethics. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 2 (1):31-34.
    Thomasma and Pellegrino''s [3] focus on the healing relationship as the way to give medical ethics a philosophical foundation contains a number of difficulties. Most importantly, their approach focuses philosophical analysis on an idealized view of the healing relationship in which the ideal of health is seen as an uncontroversial norm in the individual case. medical ethics is then characterized as an intrinsic part of the medical act itself. Philosophical inquiry seems limited to a description of the practice of medicine (...)
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  19. Jaworska Agnieszka & Tannenbaum Julie (forthcoming). Who Has the Capacity to Participate as a Rearee in a Person-Rearing Relationship. Ethics.
    We discuss applications of our account of moral status grounded in person-rearing relationships: which individuals have higher moral status or not, and why? We cover three classes of cases: (1) cases involving incomplete realization of the capacity to care, including whether infants or fetuses have this incomplete capacity; (2) cases in which higher moral status rests in part on what is required for the being to flourish; (3) hypothetical cases in which cognitive enhancements could, e.g., help dogs achieve human-like cognitive (...)
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  20. Judith C. Ahronheim, Jonathan Moreno, Connie Zuckerman & Laurence B. McCullough (1995). Ethics in Clinical Practice. HEC Forum 7 (6):377-378.
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  21. Timo Airaksinen & Manu J. Vuorio (1988). Medical Ethics in Finland: Some Recent Trends. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 9 (3).
    This paper reviews the research done in Finland on medical ethics in the last three years and published in four leading journals. The general characteristics of this area are discussed and some comments on its most conspicuous representatives are offered. The conclusion reached is that medical ethics in Finland is still in a rather embryonic stage of development, and that more systematic and theoretically sophisticated approaches are required. However, since many physicians have become interested in ethical questions, it can be (...)
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  22. Darrel W. Amundsen (1996). Medicine, Society, and Faith in the Ancient and Medieval Worlds. Johns Hopkins University Press.
    In Medicine, Society, and Faith in the Ancient and Medieval Worlds Darrel Amundsen explores the disputed boundaries of medicine and Christianity by focusing on the principle of the sanctity of human life, including the duty to treat or attempt to sustain the life of the ill. As he examines his themes and moves from text to context, Amundsen clarifies a number of Christian principles in relation to bioethical issues that are hotly debated today. In his examination of the moral stance (...)
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  23. Gary R. Anderson & Valerie A. Glesnes-Anderson (eds.) (1987). Health Care Ethics: A Guide for Decision Makers. Aspen Publishers.
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  24. Judith Andre (1999). The Alleged Incompatibility of Business and Medical Ethics. HEC Forum 11 (4):288-292.
    Business Ethics and medical ethics are in principle compatible: In particular, the tools of business ethics can be useful to those doing healthcare ethics. Health care could be conducted as a business and maintain its moral core.
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  25. Jonny Anomaly (2015). What's Wrong with Factory Farming? Public Health Ethics 8 (2):phu001.
    Factory farming continues to grow around the world as a low cost way of producing animal products for human consumption. But many of the practices associated with intensive animal farming have been criticized by public health professionals and animal welfare advocates. The aim of this essay is to raise three independent moral concerns with factory farming, and to explain why these practices flourish despite the cruelty inflicted on animals and the public health risks imposed on people. I conclude that the (...)
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  26. Jonny Anomaly (2011). Public Health and Public Goods. Public Health Ethics 4 (3):251-259.
    It has become increasingly difficult to distinguish public health from tangentially related fields like social work. I argue that we should reclaim the more traditional conception of public health as the provision of health-related public goods. The public goods account has the advantage of establishing a relatively clear and distinctive mission for public health. It also allows a consensus of people with different comprehensive moral and political commitments to endorse public health measures, even if they disagree about precisely why they (...)
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  27. Thalia Arawi & Philip Rosoff (2012). Competing Duties. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 9 (2):135-147.
    Over the last 80 years, a major goal of medical educators has been to improve the quality of applicants to medical school and, hence, the resulting doctors. To do this, academic standards have been progressively strengthened. The Medical College Admission Test (MCAT) in the United States and the undergraduate science grade point average (GPA) have long been correlated with success in medical school, and graduation rates have been close to 100 percent for many years. Recent studies have noted that some (...)
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  28. Robert M. Arnold & Lachlan Forrow (1993). Empirical Research in Medical Ethics: An Introduction. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 14 (3):195-196.
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  29. John Arras & Robert Hunt (eds.) (1983). Ethical Issues in Modern Medicine. Mayfield Pub. Co..
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  30. Richard E. Ashcroft (ed.) (2007). Principles of Health Care Ethics. John Wiley & Sons.
    Edited by four leading members of the new generation of medical and healthcare ethicists working in the UK, respected worldwide for their work in medical ethics, Principles of Health Care Ethics, Second Edition_is a standard resource for students, professionals, and academics wishing to understand current and future issues in healthcare ethics. With a distinguished international panel of contributors working at the leading edge of academia, this volume presents a comprehensive guide to the field, with state of the art introductions to (...)
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  31. Benedict M. Ashley (1997). Health Care Ethics: A Theological Analysis. Georgetown University Press.
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  32. Benedict M. Ashley (1994). Ethics of Health Care: An Introductory Textbook. Georgetown University Press.
    Contending that concern over the ethical dimensions of these and other like issues are no longer just in the domain of those involved in medical practice, the ...
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  33. Nafsika Athanassoulis (2007). Training Good Professionals. In Richard E. Ashcroft (ed.), Principles of Health Care Ethics.
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  34. John Atkinson (1976). Doctors' Dilemmas: A Discussion of Medical Ethics. Epworth Press.
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  35. Derrick K. S. Au (1999). Constructing Options for Health Care Reform in Hong Kong. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 24 (6):607 – 623.
    The Harvard Report, published in April 1999 for public consultation in Hong Kong, proposed a fundamental restructuring in its health care delivery and financing systems. The Report claims to be evidence-based in its approach (Hsiao et al., 1999a). While 'evidence' has been widely collected by the consultancy team through surveys, consultations and focus groups, the recommendations put forth are not value-free. They carry clear ideological preferences. The value assumptions and ethical presuppositions underlying the report are discussed in this paper. The (...)
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  36. Mark P. Aulisio, Robert M. Arnold & Stuart J. Youngner (eds.) (2003). Ethics Consultation: From Theory to Practice. Johns Hopkins University Press.
    In the clinical setting, questions of medical ethics raise a host of perplexing problems, often complicated by conflicting perspectives and the need to make immediate decisions. In this volume, bioethicists and physicians provide a nuanced, in-depth approach to the difficult issues involved in bioethics consultation. Addressing the needs of researchers, clinicians, and other health professionals on the front lines of bioethics practice, the contributors focus primarily on practical concerns -- whether ethics consultation is best done by individuals, teams, or committees (...)
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  37. Norman Autton (1984). Doctors Talking: A Guide to Current Medico-Moral Problems. Mowbray.
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  38. Robert Baker (ed.) (1999). The American Medical Ethics Revolution: How the Ama's Code of Ethics has Transformed Physicians' Relationships to Patients, Professionals, and Society. Johns Hopkins University Press.
    The American Medical Association enacted its Code of Ethics in 1847, the first such national codification. In this volume, a distinguished group of experts from the fields of medicine, bioethics, and history of medicine reflect on the development of medical ethics in the United States, using historical analyses as a springboard for discussions of the problems of the present, including what the editors call "a sense of moral crisis precipitated by the shift from a system of fee-for-service medicine to a (...)
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  39. Robert Baker & Laurence B. McCullough (eds.) (2009). The Cambridge World History of Medical Ethics. Cambridge University Press.
    The Cambridge World History of Medical Ethics is the first comprehensive scholarly account of the global history of medical ethics. Offering original interpretations of the field by leading bioethicists and historians of medicine, it will serve as the essential point of departure for future scholarship in the field. The volumes reconceptualize the history of medical ethics through the creation of new categories, including the life cycle; discourses of religion, philosophy, and bioethics; and the relationship between medical ethics and the state, (...)
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  40. Robert Baker & Laurence B. McCullough (2007). Medical Ethics' Appropriation of Moral Philosophy: The Case of the Sympathetic and the Unsympathetic Physician. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 17 (1):3-22.
    Philosophy textbooks typically treat bioethics as a form of "applied ethics"-i.e., an attempt to apply a moral theory, like utilitarianism, to controversial ethical issues in biology and medicine. Historians, however, can find virtually no cases in which applied philosophical moral theory influenced ethical practice in biology or medicine. In light of the absence of historical evidence, the authors of this paper advance an alternative model of the historical relationship between philosophical ethics and medical ethics, the appropriation model. They offer two (...)
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  41. Robert Baker & Laurence B. McCullough (2007). The Relationship Between Moral Philosophy and Medical Ethics Reconsidered. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 17 (3):271-276.
    : Medical ethics often is treated as applied ethics, that is, the application of moral philosophy to ethical issues in medicine. In an earlier paper, we examined instances of moral philosophy's influence on medical ethics. We found the applied ethics model inadequate and sketched an alternative model. On this model, practitioners seeking to change morality "appropriate" concepts and theory fragments from moral philosophy to valorize and justify their innovations. Goldilocks-like, five commentators tasted our offerings. Some found them too cold, since (...)
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  42. Rebecca Bamford (2014). Getting Even More Specific About Physicians' Obligations: Justice, Responsibility, and Professionalism. American Journal of Bioethics 14 (9):46-47.
    (2014). Getting Even More Specific About Physicians’ Obligations: Justice, Responsibility, and Professionalism. The American Journal of Bioethics: Vol. 14, No. 9, pp. 46-47.
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  43. Bertram Bandman (2003). The Moral Development of Health Care Professionals: Rational Decisionmaking in Health Care Ethics. Praeger.
    A central challenge motivates this work: How, if at all, can philosophical ethics help in the moral development of health professionals?
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  44. Zbigniew Bańkowski & J. Corvera Bernardelli (eds.) (1981). Medical Ethics and Medical Education: Proceedings of the Xivth Round Table Conference, Mexico City, Mexico, 1-3 December 1980. [REVIEW] Who Publications Centre [Distributor].
  45. Bernard Barber (ed.) (1978). Medical Ethics and Social Change. American Academy of Political and Social Science.
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  46. Samuel Bard (1769/1996). A Discourse Upon the Duties of a Physician: With Some Sentiments, on the Usefulness and Necessity of a Public Hospital: Delivered Before the President and Governors of King' College, Held on the 16th of May 1769: As Advice to Those Gentlemen Who Then Received the First Medical Degrees Conferred by That University. [REVIEW] Applewood Books.
    This classic essay on the responsibilities of a doctor was first published in New York in 1769. It remains a perfect gift for a young doctor just starting out or for one who is older and wiser. This classic will be an inspiration to any who read its timeless message.
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  47. Robert Laurence Barry (2002). The Sanctity of Human Life and its Protection. University Press of America.
    This work examines the various implications of the Roman Catholic doctrine of the sanctity of life.
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  48. Yohanna Barth-Rogers & Alan Jotkowitz (2009). Executive Autonomy, Multiculturalism and Traditional Medical Ethics. American Journal of Bioethics 9 (2):39 – 40.
  49. Robert Bass, Quotidian Medical Epistemology.
    My title may suggest that I will address the activities of medical professionals as they go about their daily business of diagnosis, prescription and treatment. Certainly, that deserves attention, but it is not my target here. My concern is, on the one hand, with typical consumers of health and medical information, and, on the other, with the problems such consumers face in understanding, interpreting and applying the information available to them.
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  50. Tom L. Beauchamp (2009). Principles of Biomedical Ethics. Oxford University Press.
    This edition represents a thorough-going revision of what has become a classic text in biomedical ethics. Major structural changes mark the revision. The authors have added a new concluding chapter on methods that, along with its companion chapter on moral theory, emphasizes convergence across theories, coherence in moral justification, and the common morality. They have simplified the opening chapter on moral norms which introduces the framework of prima facie moral principles and ways to specify and balance them. Together with the (...)
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