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Medieval and Renaissance Philosophy

Edited by Margaret Cameron (University of Victoria)
Assistant editors: Tracy R.W. de Boer, Andrew Park
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  1. added 2014-08-16
    Ann A. Pang-White (2011). Friendship and Happiness: Why Matter Matters in Augustine's Confessions. In Richard C. Taylor David Twetten & Michael Wreen (eds.), Tolle Lege: Essays on Augustine & on Medieval Philosophy in Honor of Roland J. Teske. Marquette University Press. 175-195.
    This paper presents a refreshing new reading of Augustine's view on matter. It argues that Augustine's evolving view on matter from the negative to the positive, from the overly simplistic understanding of matter as something purely physical to a nuanced view of spiritual matter, played an essential role in the Confessions. Matter, in this new understanding, accounts for both space and time. As Augustine matured as a thinker, he saw matter's potentiality also positively as possibility for grace for the embodied (...)
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  2. added 2014-08-16
    Ann Pang-White (1994). Augustine on Divine Foreknowledge and Human Free Will. Revue Des Études Augustiniennes 40:417-431.
  3. added 2014-08-06
    Bruce Milem (2002). The Unspoken Word: Negative Theology in Meister Eckhart's German Sermons. Catholic University of America Press.
    First Eckhart says, "God is a word, an unspoken word." This sentence recalls the beginning of the Gospel of John, but it is curious that Eckhart alludes to its identification of the Word with God precisely here, right after he asserts God's ineffa- ...
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  4. added 2014-08-06
    Bruce Milem (1999). Meister Eckhart and the Image: Sermon 16b. The Eckhart Review 8:47-59.
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  5. added 2014-08-06
    Bruce Milem (1996). Suffering God: Meister Eckhart's Sermon 52. Mystics Quarterly 22:69-90.
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  6. added 2014-07-23
    Marek Piechowiak (2013). Tomasza Z Akwinu Koncepcja Prawa Naturalnego. Czy Akwinata Jest Myślicielem Liberalnym? [Thomas Aquinas’s Conception of Natural Law: Is Aquinas a Liberal Thinker?]. Przegląd Tomistyczny 19:301-337.
    This article seeks to justify the claim that Thomas Aquinas proposed a concept of natural law which is immune to the argument against the recognition of an objective grounding of the good formulated by a well-known representative of the liberal tradition, Isaiah Berlin, in his famous essay “Two Concepts of Freedom.” I argue that Aquinas’s concept of freedom takes into account the very same values and goals that Berlin set out to defend when he composed his critique of natural law. (...)
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