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Medieval and Renaissance Philosophy

Edited by Margaret Cameron (University of Victoria)
Assistant editors: Tracy R.W. de Boer, Andrew Park
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  1. added 2014-07-23
    Marek Piechowiak (2013). Tomasza Z Akwinu Koncepcja Prawa Naturalnego. Czy Akwinata Jest Myślicielem Liberalnym? [Thomas Aquinas’s Conception of Natural Law: Is Aquinas a Liberal Thinker?]. Przegląd Tomistyczny 19:301-337.
    This article seeks to justify the claim that Thomas Aquinas proposed a concept of natural law which is immune to the argument against the recognition of an objective grounding of the good formulated by a well-known representative of the liberal tradition, Isaiah Berlin, in his famous essay “Two Concepts of Freedom.” I argue that Aquinas’s concept of freedom takes into account the very same values and goals that Berlin set out to defend when he composed his critique of natural law. (...)
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  2. added 2014-06-19
    Gert Partoens (forthcoming). Augustine on Predestination, Immortal Babies, and Sinning Foetuses in Advance. Augustinian Studies.
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  3. added 2014-06-12
    Frédéric Goubier (2014). Dire et vouloir dire dans la logique médiévale : Quelques jalons pour situer une frontière. Methodos 14.
    La philosophie médiévale du langage présente deux séries d’affinités remarquables avec les approches contemporaines. L’une se situe du côté des sémantiques formelles et, plus généralement, des analyses logiques des conditions de vérité des énoncés. L’autre relève plutôt de la pragmatique, notamment des perspectives contextuelles sur les actes de langage. Les logiciens, grammairiens et théologiens du Moyen Âge étaient, de fait, pleinement conscients qu’ils avaient à leur disposition deux types d’approche des énoncés, selon qu’ils prenaient en compte les seules propriétés sémantiques (...)
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  4. added 2014-06-09
    Laurent Cesalli & Majolino (2014). Making Sense. On the Cluster significatio-intentio in Medieval and “Austrian” Philosophies. Methodos 14.
    “Austrian” (or “Austro-German”) philosophy of language is characterized, among other things, by the following two features: (1) Problems of language are considered within the broader framework of an intentionality-based philosophy of mind—or, to put it more precisely, questions of meaning are considered as involving a quite articulated theory of intentions; (2) several aspects of such an account are explicitly presented as inspired by or somehow already at work in the Medieval Scholastic tradition. In this study we follow the track indicated (...)
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  5. added 2014-06-09
    Amy Schmitter (2014). The Third Meditation on Objective Being: Representation and Intentional Content. In David Cunning (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Descartes’ Meditations. Cambridge University Press. 149-67.
  6. added 2014-06-09
    Sten Ebbesen (2009). Topics in Latin Philosophy From the 12th-14th Century: Collected Essays of Sten Ebbesen. Volume 2. Ashgate.
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  7. added 2014-06-09
    Umberto Eco & Costantino Marmo (eds.) (1989). On the Medieval Theory of Signs. Benjamins.
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  8. added 2014-06-09
    E. J. Ashworth (1980). Can I Speak More Clearly Than I Understand? A Problem of Religious Language in Henry of Ghent, Duns Scotus and Ockham. Historiographia Linguistica 7 (1/2):29-38.
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  9. added 2014-06-04
    Yann Benétreau-Dupin (forthcoming). Buridan's Solution to the Liar Paradox. History and Philosophy of Logic:1-11.
    Jean Buridan has offered a solution to the Liar Paradox, i.e. to the problem of assigning a truth-value to the sentence ‘What I am saying is false’. It has been argued that either (1) this solution is ad hoc since it would only apply to self-referencing sentences [Read, S. 2002. ‘The Liar Paradox from John Buridan back to Thomas Bradwardine’, Vivarium, 40 (2), 189–218] or else (2) it weakens his theory of truth, making his ‘a logic without truth’ [Klima, G. (...)
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  10. added 2014-06-04
    Daniel D. De Haan (forthcoming). A Mereological Construal of the Primary Notions Being and Thing in Avicenna and Aquinas in Advance. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly.
    This study has two goals: first, to show that Avicenna’s account of being and thing significantly influenced Aquinas’s doctrine of the primary notions; second, to establish the value of adopting a mereological construal of these primary notions in the metaphysics of Avicenna and Aquinas. I begin with an explication of the mereological construal of the primary notions that casts these notions in terms of wholes and parts. Being and thing refer to the same entitative whole and have the same extension, (...)
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  11. added 2014-05-14
    Leone Gazziero (2013). Et quoniam est quis tertius homo. Argument, exégèse, contresens dans la littérature latine apparentée aux Sophistici elenchi d’Aristote. Archives D’Histoire Doctrinale Et Littéraire du Moyen Âge 80:7-48.
  12. added 2014-05-05
    Chad Engelland (forthcoming). Ostension: Word Learning and the Embodied Mind. MIT Press.
    Ostension is bodily movement that manifests our engagement with things, whether we wish it to or not. Gestures, glances, facial expressions: all betray our interest in something. Ostension enables our first word learning, providing infants with a prelinguistic way to grasp the meaning of words. Ostension is philosophically puzzling; it cuts across domains seemingly unbridgeable -- public--private, inner--outer, mind--body. In this book, Chad Engelland offers a philosophical investigation of ostension and its role in word learning by infants. Engelland discusses ostension (...)
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