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Medieval and Renaissance Philosophy

Edited by Margaret Cameron (University of Victoria)
Assistant editors: Andrew Park, Tracy R.W. de Boer
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  1. added 2014-10-20
    Georgios Steiris (2014). Giovanni Pico Della Mirandola on Anaxagoras. Viator 45 (3):363-375.
    Giovanni Pico della Mirandola (1463-1494) focuses on Anaxagoras (ca. 500-428 BC) because he considers him as a precursor of the the later Neoplatonic concept all things exist in all things in their own mode, which became the core of Pico’s metaphysics. Anaxagoras’s philosophy permits Pico to establish his doctrine that all things share a portion of God within them, in their own way. Pico rejects the fixed position of man in the ontological hierarchy. Man has the chance to become everything. (...)
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  2. added 2014-10-09
    Achille C. Varzi & Claudio Calosi (2014). Le Tribolazioni Del Filosofare. Comedia Metaphysica Ne la Quale Si Tratta de Li Errori & de le Pene de L’Infero. Laterza.
    A scholarly annotated epic poem on the pitfalls and tribulations of “good philosophizing”. Divided into twenty-eight cantos (in medieval Italian hendecasyllabic terza rima), the poem tells of an allegorical journey through the downward spiral of the philosophers’ hell, where all sorts of thinkers are punished for their faults and mistakes, in the endeavor to reach a way out of the condition of intellectual impasse in which the narrator has found himself. The affinities with Dante’s Inferno are apparent. Whereas Dante’s poem (...)
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  3. added 2014-10-03
    Mehmet Karabela (2014). The Art of Dialectic Between Dialogue and Rhetoric: The Aristotelian Tradition. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Philosophy 52 (4).
  4. added 2014-10-01
    Pirooz Fatoorchi, Tusi's Three Philosophical Questions.
  5. added 2014-10-01
    Pirooz Fatoorchi, Tusi's Three Philosophical Questions ( Appendix: Arabic Text).
  6. added 2014-09-30
    Timothy Pawl (2014). Thomistic Multiple Incarnations. Heythrop Journal (6).
    In this article I present St. Thomas Aquinas’s views on the possibility of multiple incarnations. First I disambiguate four things one might mean when saying that multiple incarnations are possible. Then I provide and justify what I take to be Aquinas’s answers to these questions, showing the intricacies of his argumentation and concluding that he holds an extremely robust view of the possibility of multiple incarnations. According to Aquinas, I argue, there could be three simultaneously existing concrete rational natures, each (...)
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  7. added 2014-09-29
    Giorgio Pini (2013). What Lucifer Wanted: Anselm, Aquinas, and Scotus on the Object of the First Evil Choice. Oxford Studies in Medieval Philosophy 1:61-82.
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  8. added 2014-09-29
    Marilyn McCord Adams (2013). Genuine Agency, Somehow Shared? The Holy Spirit and Other Gifts. Oxford Studies in Medieval Philosophy 1:23-60.
  9. added 2014-09-23
    Susan Brower-Toland (2014). &Quot;william Ockham on the Scope and Limits of Consciousness&Quot;. Vivarium 52:197-219.
  10. added 2014-08-16
    Ann A. Pang-White (2011). Friendship and Happiness: Why Matter Matters in Augustine's Confessions. In Richard C. Taylor David Twetten & Michael Wreen (eds.), Tolle Lege: Essays on Augustine & on Medieval Philosophy in Honor of Roland J. Teske. Marquette University Press. 175-195.
    This paper presents a refreshing new reading of Augustine's view on matter. It argues that Augustine's evolving view on matter from the negative to the positive, from the overly simplistic understanding of matter as something purely physical to a nuanced view of spiritual matter, played an essential role in the Confessions. Matter, in this new understanding, accounts for both space and time. As Augustine matured as a thinker, he saw matter's potentiality also positively as possibility for grace for the embodied (...)
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  11. added 2014-08-16
    Ann Pang-White (1994). Augustine on Divine Foreknowledge and Human Free Will. Revue Des Études Augustiniennes 40:417-431.
  12. added 2014-08-06
    Bruce Milem (2002). The Unspoken Word: Negative Theology in Meister Eckhart's German Sermons. Catholic University of America Press.
    First Eckhart says, "God is a word, an unspoken word." This sentence recalls the beginning of the Gospel of John, but it is curious that Eckhart alludes to its identification of the Word with God precisely here, right after he asserts God's ineffa- ...
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  13. added 2014-08-06
    Bruce Milem (1999). Meister Eckhart and the Image: Sermon 16b. The Eckhart Review 8:47-59.
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  14. added 2014-08-06
    Bruce Milem (1996). Suffering God: Meister Eckhart's Sermon 52. Mystics Quarterly 22:69-90.
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