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  1. Marilyn McCord Adams (1976). What Does Ockham Mean by `Supposition'? Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic 17 (3):375-391.
  2. Tuomo Aho & Mikko Yrjönsuuri (2009). Late Medieval Logic. In Leila Haaparanta (ed.), The Development of Modern Logic. Oxford University Press. 11.
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  3. Albertus (2010). Quaestiones Circa Logicam =. Peeters.
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  4. Ahmed Alwishah & David Sanson (2009). The Early Arabic Liar: The Liar Paradox in the Islamic World From the Mid-Ninth to the Mid-Thirteenth Centuries Ce. Vivarium (1):97-127.
    We describe the earliest occurrences of the Liar Paradox in the Arabic tradition. e early Mutakallimūn claim the Liar Sentence is both true and false; they also associate the Liar with problems concerning plural subjects, which is somewhat puzzling. Abharī (1200-1265) ascribes an unsatisfiable truth condition to the Liar Sentence—as he puts it, its being true is the conjunction of its being true and false—and so concludes that the sentence is not true. Tūsī (1201-1274) argues that self-referential sentences, like the (...)
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  5. Robert Andrews (1998). The Notabilia Scoti in Libros Topicorum: An Assessment of Authenticity. Franciscan Studies 56 (1):65-75.
  6. Ignacio Angelelli & María Cerezo (eds.) (1996). Studies on the History of Logic: Proceedings of the Iii. Symposium on the History of Logic. Walter De Gruyter.
  7. E. J. Ashwort (1991). Signification and Modes of Signifying in Thirteenth-Century Logic: A Preface to Aquinas on Analogy. Medieval Philosophy and Theology 1:39-67.
  8. E. J. Ashworth (1989). Essay Review. History and Philosophy of Logic 10 (2):213-225.
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  9. E. J. Ashworth (1986). Renaissance Man as Logician: Josse Clichtove (1472–1543) on Disputations. History and Philosophy of Logic 7 (1):15-29.
    Josse Clichtove represents a turning point in the history of disputation, for he combines one of the earliest accounts of the doctrinal disputation with one of the latest accounts of the obligational disputation. This paper describes the nature and significance of the theories that he offered. Particular attention is paid to the doctrines of truth, necessity and possibility which lie behind his doctrines; and also to the light which his work throws on the aims and nature of an obligational disputation.
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  10. E. J. Ashworth (1984). Inconsistency and Paradox in Medieval Disputations: A Development of Some Hints in Ockham. Franciscan Studies 44 (1):129-139.
  11. E. J. Ashworth (1979). The "Libelli Sophistarum" and the Use of Medieval Logic Texts at Oxford and Cambridge in the Early Sixteenth Century. Vivarium 17 (2):134-158.
  12. E. J. Ashworth (1978). Theories of the Proposition: Some Early Sixteenth Century Discussions. Franciscan Studies 38 (1):81-121.
  13. E. J. Ashworth (1978). Multiple Quantification and the Use of Special Quantifiers in Early Sixteenth Century Logic. Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic 19 (4):599-613.
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  14. E. J. Ashworth (1978). The Tradition of Medieval Logic and Speculative Grammar From Anselm to the End of the Seventeenth Century: A Bibliography From 1836 Onwards. Pontifical Institute of Mediaeval Studies.
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  15. E. J. Ashworth (1977). An Early Fifteenth Century Discussion of Infinite Sets. Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic 18 (2):232-234.
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  16. E. J. Ashworth (1976). I Promise You a Hoyse. Vivarium 14 (1):62-79.
  17. E. J. Ashworth (1976). Will Socrates Cross the Bridge?: A Problem in Medieval Logic. Franciscan Studies 36 (1):75-84.
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  18. E. J. Ashworth (1974). Language and Logic in the Post-Medieval Period. Reidel.
    HISTORICAL INTRODUCTION Although many of the details of the development of logic in the Middle Ages remain to be filled in, it is well known that between ...
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  19. E. J. Ashworth (1973). The Theory of Consequence in the Late Fifteenth and Early Sixteenth Centuries. Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic 14 (3):289-315.
  20. E. J. Ashworth (1973). The Doctrine of Exponibilia in the Fifteenth and Sixteenth Centuries. Vivarium 11 (1):137-167.
  21. E. J. Ashworth (1973). Andreas Kesler and the Later Theory of Consequence. Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic 14 (2):205-214.
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  22. E. J. Ashworth (1972). Strict and Material Implication in the Early Sixteenth Century. Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic 13 (4):556-560.
  23. E. J. Ashworth (1972). The Treatment of Semantic Paradoxes From 1400 to 1700. Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic 13 (1):34-52.
  24. E. J. Ashworth (1968). Petrus Fonseca and Material Implication. Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic 9 (3):227-228.
  25. E. Jennifer Ashworth (2013). Descent and Ascent From Ockham to Domingo de Soto: An Answer to Paul Spade. Vivarium 51 (1-4):385-410.
  26. E. Jennifer Ashworth (2007). Metaphor and the Logicians From Aristotle to Cajetan. Vivarium 45 (s 2-3):311-327.
    I examine the treatment of metaphor by medieval logicians and how it stemmed from their reception of classical texts in logic, grammar, and rhetoric. I consider the relation of the word 'metaphor' to the notions of translatio and transumptio, and show that it is not always synonymous with these. I also show that in the context of commentaries on the Sophistical Refutations metaphor was subsumed under equivocation. In turn, it was linked with the notion of analogy not so much in (...)
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  27. Avicenna (1973). The Propositional Logic of Avicena. Springer.
    INTRODUCTION The main purpose of this work is to provide an English translation of and commentary on a recently published Arabic text dealing with conditional propositions and syllogisms. The text is that of Avicenna (Abu 'All ibn Sina, ...
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  28. Allan Bäck (2013). Avicenna's Theory of Supposition. Vivarium 51 (1-4):81-115.
  29. Allan Bäck (1996). On Reduplication: Logical Theories of Qualification. E.J. Brill.
    "On Reduplication is a study of the logical properties of reduplicative propositions, that is, of propositions having qualifications, like 'Christ "qua God is a ...
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  30. Allan Bäck (1995). Joep Lameer, Al-Fārābī and Aristotelian Syllogistic: Greek Theory and Islamic Practice, Leiden-New York-Köln (E.J. Brill) 1994, XX + 351 P. ISBN 90-04-09884-. [REVIEW] Vivarium 33 (2):246-249.
  31. Paul J. J. M. Bakker (1996). Syncatégorèmes, Concepts, Équivocité. Vivarium 34 (1):76-131.
  32. Jonathan Barnes (1990). Eleonore Stump: Dialectic and its Place in the Development of Medieval Logic. Pp. X + 274. Ithaca and London: Cornell University Press, 1989. $37.95. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 40 (02):500-501.
  33. Stephen Barney, Wendy Lewis, Calvin Normore & Terence Parsons (1997). On the Properties of Discourse: A Translation of Tractatus de Proprietatibus Sermonum (Author Anonymous). Topoi 16 (1):77-93.
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  34. J. D. Bastable (1956). William Ockham, Summa Logicae. Philosophical Studies 6:243-244.
  35. Yann Benétreau-Dupin (forthcoming). Buridan's Solution to the Liar Paradox. History and Philosophy of Logic:1-11.
    Jean Buridan has offered a solution to the Liar Paradox, i.e. to the problem of assigning a truth-value to the sentence ‘What I am saying is false’. It has been argued that either (1) this solution is ad hoc since it would only apply to self-referencing sentences [Read, S. 2002. ‘The Liar Paradox from John Buridan back to Thomas Bradwardine’, Vivarium, 40 (2), 189–218] or else (2) it weakens his theory of truth, making his ‘a logic without truth’ [Klima, G. (...)
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  36. C. Francisco Bertelloni (1986). Ein Fehltritt im Ockhams Empirismus?: Über eine Stelle des 'Breviloquiums'. Franciscan Studies 46 (1):227-241.
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  37. Deborah L. Black (1990). Logic and Aristotle's Rhetoric and Poetics in Medieval Arabic Philosophy. E.J. Brill.
  38. Józef M. Bocheński (1961). A History of Formal Logic. Notre Dame, Ind.,University of Notre Dame Press.
  39. Philotheus Boehner (1952). Medieval Logic. [Manchester, Eng.]Manchester University Press.
    PART ONE ELEMENTS OF SCHOLASTIC LOGIC I THE LEGACY OF SCHOLASTIC LOGIC "\ T 7E MAY safely describe the initial scholastic contri- VV bution to logical ...
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  40. Philotheus Boehner (1952/1979). Medieval Logic: An Outline of its Development From 1250 to C.1400. Hyperion Press.
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  41. Ivan Boh (1993). Epistemic Logic in the Later Middle Ages. Routledge.
    Epistemic logic is one of the most exciting areas in medieval philosophy. Neglected almost entirely after the end of the Middle Ages, it has been rediscovered by philosophers of the twentieth century. Epistemic Logic in the Later Middle Ages provides the first comprehensive study of the subject. Ivan Boh explores the contrast between epistemic and alethic conceptions of consequence, the general epistemic rules of consequence, the search for conditions of knowing contingent propositions, the problems of substitutivity in intentional contexts, the (...)
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  42. Ivan Boh (1988). Jean Buridan's Logic. The Treatise on Supposition. The Treatise on Consequences. Journal of the History of Philosophy 26 (4):662-664.
  43. Ivan Boh (1984). Propositional Attitudes in the Logic of Walter Burley and William Ockham. Franciscan Studies 44 (1):31-59.
  44. Ivan Boh (1963). Walter Burleigh's Hypothetical Syllogistic. Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic 4 (4):241-269.
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  45. John Boler (1998). Ockham on Difference in Category. Franciscan Studies 56 (1):97-113.
  46. John Boler (1994). Accidents in Ockham's Ontological Project. Franciscan Studies 54 (1):79-97.
  47. John Boler (1985). Ockham's Cleaver. Franciscan Studies 45 (1):119-144.
  48. John Boler (1976). Ockham on Evident Cognition. Franciscan Studies 36 (1):85-98.
  49. Stefania Bonfiglioli & Costantino Marmo (2007). Symbolism and Linguistic Semantics. Some Questions (and Confusions) From Late Antique Neoplatonism Up to Eriugena. Vivarium 45 (s 2-3):238-252.
    The notion of 'symbol' in Eriugena's writing is far from clear. It has an ambiguous semantic connection with other terms such as 'signification', 'figure', 'allegory', 'veil', 'agalma', 'form', 'shadow', 'mystery' and so on. This paper aims to explore into the origins of such a semantic ambiguity, already present in the texts of the pseudo-Dionysian corpus which Eriugena translated and commented upon. In the probable Neoplatonic sources of this corpus, the Greek term symbolon shares some aspects of its meaning with other (...)
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  50. E. P. Bos (1986). Essay Review. History and Philosophy of Logic 7 (1):57-63.
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