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  1. Rudolph Allers (1947). Language and Myth. The Modern Schoolman 24 (4):241-246.
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  2. Fabrizio Amerini (2011). Pragmatics and Semantics in Thomas Aquinas. Vivarium 49 (1-3):95-126.
    Thomas Aquinas's account of the semantics of names is based on two fundamental distinctions: the distinction between a name's mode of signifying and the signified object, and that between the cause and the goal of a name's signification, i.e. that from which a name was instituted to signify and that which a name actually signifies. Thomas endows names with a two-layer signification: names are introduced into language to designate primarily conceptions of extramental things and secondarily the particular extramental things referred (...)
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  3. Rüdiger Arnzen (2002). Ausgewählte Literatur in »weslichen« Sprachen für das Studium der mittelalterlichen Philosophie in arabischer und persischer Sprache. Bochumer Philosophisches Jahrbuch Fur Antike Und Mittelalter 7 (1):125-178.
  4. E. J. Ashworth (2002). Le Discours Intérieur de Platon à Guillaume d'Ockham. Dialogue 41 (1):202-203.
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  5. E. J. Ashworth (1981). Mental Language and the Unity of Propositions: A Semantic Problem Discussed by Early Sixteenth Century Logicians. Franciscan Studies 41 (1):61-96.
  6. E. J. Ashworth (1978). Theories of the Proposition: Some Early Sixteenth Century Discussions. Franciscan Studies 38 (1):81-121.
  7. Allan Bäck (2013). Avicenna's Theory of Supposition. Vivarium 51 (1-4):81-115.
  8. Allan Back (2011). Avicennas Hermeneutics. Vivarium 49 (1-3):9-25.
    Like Plato, Aristotle uses dialectic to interpret and analyze ordinary discourse as well as to ascend to the first principles of philosophy and science. At the same time he says that it is intellect ( noûs ) that apprehends the first principle. With al-Fārābī and Avicenna (Ibn Sīnā), dialectic becomes relegated to dealing with ordinary language. For them demonstration in an ideal language from principles apprehended by the intellect suffices for the philosopher.
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  9. J. D. Bastable (1956). William Ockham, Summa Logicae. Philosophical Studies 6:243-244.
  10. Philotheus Boehner (1946). Ockham's Theory of Signification. Franciscan Studies 6 (2):143-170.
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  11. Stephen F. Brown (2010). William of Ockham and St. Augustine on Proper and Improper Statements. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 84:57-64.
    William of Ockham discussed the fallacy of amphiboly twice in his writings. The first treatment was in his Expositio super libros Elenchorum, where he simply presents Aristotle’s treatment, updates it with some Latin examples, and tells us it is not too important, since we do not often run into cases of ambiguity of thiskind. Later, in his Summa logicae, however, he extends his treatment appreciably. He here includes under ambiguous statements philosophical and theological sentences which are improperly stated. Led by (...)
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  12. Stephen F. Brown (1967). Sources for Ockham's Prologue to the Sentences — II. Franciscan Studies 27 (1):39-107.
  13. Stephen F. Brown (1966). Sources for Ockham's Prologue to the Sentences. Franciscan Studies 26 (1):36-65.
  14. Keith Buersmeyer (1987). Aquinas on the "Modi Significandi". The Modern Schoolman 64 (2):73-95.
  15. Margaret Cameron (2013). Boethius on Mind, Grammar and Logic: A Study of Boethius' Commentaries on Peri Hermeneias. History and Philosophy of Logic 34 (4):392-396.
  16. Laurent Cesalli & Nadja Germann (2008). Signification and Truth Epistemology at the Crossroads of Semantics and Ontology in Augustine's Early Philosophical Writings. Vivarium 46 (2):123-154.
    This article is about the conception of truth and signification in Augustine's early philosophical writings. In the first, semantic-linguistic part, the gradual shift of Augustine's position towards the Academics is treated closely. It reveals that Augustine develops a notion of sign which, by integrating elements of Stoic epistemology, is suited to function as a transmitter of true knowledge through linguistic expressions. In the second part, both the ontological structure of signified (sensible) things and Augustine's solution to the apparent tautologies of (...)
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  17. Richard Colledge (2008). On Ex(s)Istere. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 82:263-274.
    This paper looks to revive and advance dialogue surrounding John Nijenhuis’s case against ‘existence language’ as a rendering of Aquinas’s esse. Nijenhuis presented both a semantic/grammatical case for abandoning this practice as well as a more systematic argument based on his reading of Thomist metaphysics. On one hand, I affirm the important distinction between being and existence and lend qualified support to his interpretation of the quantitiative/qualitative correlation between esse and essentia in Aquinas’s texts. On the other hand, I take (...)
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  18. Alessandro D. Conti (2013). Semantic and Ontological Aspects of Wyclif's Theory of Supposition. Vivarium 51 (1-4):304-326.
  19. J. A. Wayne Hellmann Ofm Conv (2006). Gospel: Life or Observance?: Observations on a Language Shift in the Early Documents. Franciscan Studies 64 (1):281-292.
  20. Richard Cross (2012). Duns Scotus and Analogy. The Modern Schoolman 89 (3-4):147-154.
    Duns Scotus defends the view that we can speak univocally of God and creatures. When we do so, we use words in the same sense in the two cases. Scotus maintains that the concepts that these univocal words signify are themselves univocal: the same concept in the two cases. In this paper, I consider a related question: does Duns Scotus have the notion of analogous concepts—concepts whose relation to each other lies somewhere between the univocal and the equivocal? Using some (...)
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  21. Donald E. Daniels (1977). The Argument of the De Trinitate and Augustine's Theory of Signs. Augustinian Studies 8:33-54.
  22. Daniel D. De Haan (2010). Linguistic Apprehension as Incidental Sensation in Thomas Aquinas. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 84:179-196.
    In this paper I will delineate the psychological operations and faculties required for linguistic apprehension within a Thomistic psychology. This will require first identifying the proper object of linguistic apprehension, which will then allow me to specify the distinct operations and faculties necessary for linguistic apprehension. I will argue that the semantic value of any linguistic term is a type of incidental sensible and that its cognitive apprehension is a type of incidental sensation. Hence, the faculties necessary for the apprehension (...)
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  23. Sten Ebbesen (2011). Context-Sensitive Argumentation: Dirty Tricks in the Sophistical Refutations and a Perceptive Medieval Interpretation of the Text. Vivarium 49 (1-3):75-94.
    Aristotle in the central chapters of his Sophistical Refutations gives advice on how to counter unfair argumentation by similar means, all the while taking account not only of the adversary's arguments in themselves, but also of his philosophical commitments and state of mind, as well as the impression produced on the audience. This has offended commentators, and made most of them, medieval and modern alike, pass lightly over the relevant passages. A commentary that received the last touch in the very (...)
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  24. Umberto Eco (1984). Signification and Denotation From Boethius to Ockham. Franciscan Studies 44 (1):1-29.
  25. Gabriele Galluzzo (2008). Scotus on the Essence and Definition of Sensible Substances. Franciscan Studies 66 (1):213-232.
  26. Hester G. Gelber (1984). I Cannot Tell a Lie: Hugh of Lawton's Critique of William of Ockham on Mental Language. Franciscan Studies 44 (1):141-179.
  27. Hester Goodenough Gelber (1984). I Cannot Tell a Lie. Hugh Lawton's Critique of Ockham on Mental Language. Franciscan Studies 44:141-179.
    The article describes the evolution of Ockham's theory of mental language and its impact on three of his dominican contemporaries at oxford: Hugh Lawton, William Crathorn and Robert Holcot, and its impact at Paris on the works of Gregory of Rimini and Pierre d'Ailly. Hugh Lawton's critical response to Ockham relied on a liar-like paradox to show that mental language would preclude the ability to lie. Crathorn devised an alternative to Ockham's theory in reaction, whereas Holcot defended Ockham's views. At (...)
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  28. Alec Gordon (2008). Philosophical Translation, Metalanguage, and the Medieval Concept of Supposition. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 14:45-71.
    In his Welcome Message for the XXII World Congress of Philosophy hosted by Seoul National University in August 2008 the President of the International Federation of Philosophical Societies (FISP), Peter Kemp, said that—inter alia—it will be an occasion “for rethinking the great philosophical questions.” Amongst there questions how we in the present understand the philosophical past is surely a perennial query before us. In this short paper I will refer to the endeavor of understanding past philosophical thought on its own (...)
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  29. Nicholas Habib (1985). A Mediaeval Perspective on the Meaningfulness of Fictitious Terms: A Study of John Buridan. Franciscan Studies 45 (1):73-82.
  30. Miroslav Hanke (2011). „Debeo tibi equum“ Analýza slibů v terministické sémantice čtrnáctého století. Studia Neoaristotelica 8 (2):189-210.
    The construction of mediaeval semantic theories is based on defining semantic concepts introduced by means of paradigmatic examples. One of the commonly discussed expressions is the promise “Debeo tibi equum”. This study deals with analyses of this proposition in fourteenth century logic done by means of instruments of terminist semantics. We may distinguish between realist and nominalist analyses, the nominalist may further be classified according to how the propositional context is interpreted – whether as extensional, intensional or hyperintensional. If we (...)
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  31. Joshua P. Hochschild (2003). Analogy, Semantics, and Hermeneutics: The “Concept Versus Judgment” Critique of Cajetan's De Nominum Analogia. Medieval Philosophy and Theology 11 (02):241-260.
  32. Elizabeth Karger (1998). Richard Rufus on Naming Substances. Medieval Philosophy and Theology 7 (01):51-67.
    Some names, specifically the proper names by which people are called, are considered by at least one prominent contemporary philosopher. 1 Looking at the matter from the perspective of medieval philosophy, we might say that the reason such names are semantically ill-behaved is that the act of naming from which they derive is not one of adequate naming. Moreover, supposing that all manner of beings, including people, are we might let adequate naming be governed by the following principle: an agent (...)
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  33. Elizabeth Karger (1978). Consequences Et Inconsequences de la Supposition Vide Dans la Logique D'Ockham. Vivarium 16 (1):46-55.
  34. L. G. Kelly (1996). A Fragment of Michael de Marbasio, Summa de Modis Significandi. Vivarium 34 (2):268-269.
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  35. L. G. Kelly (1995). Sten Ebbesen (Ed.), Sprachtheorien in Spätantike Und Mittelalter, Tübingen (Gunter Narr) 1995, 408 Pp., ISBN 3 87808 673 3. (Geschichte der Sprachtheorie). [REVIEW] Vivarium 33 (2):249-254.
  36. C. H. Kneepkens (1992). Nominalism and Grammatical Theory in the Late Eleventh and Early Twelfth Centuries an Explorative Study. Vivarium 30 (1):34-50.
  37. C. H. Kneepkens (1989). The Quaestiones Grammaticales of the MS Oxford, Corpus Christi College 250: An Edition of the Third Collection 1. Vivarium 27 (2):103-124.
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  38. C. H. Kneepkens (1987). Ab Omni Homine Habetur Aliquod Capud: A Note on the Concept of Word-Order in 12th-Century Grammatical Thought. Vivarium 25 (2):146-152.
  39. C. H. Kneepkens (1985). The Quaestiones Grammaticales of the MS Oxford, Corpus Christi College 250: An Edition of the Second Collection. Vivarium 23 (2):98-123.
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  40. C. H. Kneepkens (1983). The Quaestiones Grammaticales of the MS Oxford, Corpus Christi College 250: An Edition of the First Collection. Vivarium 21 (1):1-34.
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  41. C. H. Kneepkens (1977). The Relatio Simplex in the Grammatical Tracts of the Late Twelfth and Early Thirteenth Century. Vivarium 15 (1):1-30.
  42. C. H. Kneepkens (1976). Another Manuscript of the Regulae de Mediis Syllabis Magistri Willelmi: Cambridge, Corpus Christi College, 460. Vivarium 14 (2):156-158.
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  43. C. H. Kneepkens (1976). Mulier Quae Damnavit, Salvavit. Vivarium 14 (1):1-25.
  44. Norman Kretzmann, Anthony Kenny & Jan Pinborg (eds.) (1982). Cambridge History of Later Medieval Philosophy. Cambridge.
  45. Taneli Kukkonen (2010). Al-Ghazai on the Signification of Names. Vivarium 48 (1-2):55-74.
    Al-Ghazālī's most detailed explanation of how signification works occurs in his treatise on The Beautiful Names of God. Al-Ghazālī builds squarely on the commentary tradition on Aristotle's Peri hermeneias : words signify things by means of concepts and correspondingly, existence is laid out on three levels, linguistic, conceptual, and particular (i.e. extramental). This framework allows al-Ghazālī to put forward what is essentially an Aristotelian reading of what happens when a name successfully picks out a being: when a quiddity is named (...)
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  46. Ulrich G. Leinsle (2009). Locutio angelica. Die Diskussion der Engelsprache als Antizipation einer Sprechakttheorie in Mittelalter und Früher Neuzeit. Studia Neoaristotelica 6 (2):290-292.
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  47. Neil Lewis (1995). William of Auvergne's Account of the Enuntiable: Its Relations to Nominalism and the Doctrine of the Eternal Truths. Vivarium 33 (2):113-136.
  48. Costantino Marmo (2013). Scotus on Supposition. Vivarium 51 (1-4):233-259.
  49. Costantino Marmo (1997). Bacon, Aristotle (and All the Others) on Natural Inferential Signs. Vivarium 35 (2):136-154.
  50. Costantino Marmo & Irene Rosier-Catach (2011). Introduction. Vivarium 49 (1-3):1-8.
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