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  1. Marilyn McCord Adams (2000). Re-Reading De Grammatico, or Anselm's Introduction to Aristotle's Categories. Documenti E Studi Sulla Tradizione Filosofica Medievale 11:83-112.
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  2. Marilyn McCord Adams (1990). Saint Anselm's Theory of Truth. Documenti E Studi Sulla Tradizione Filosofica Medievale 1:353-72.
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  3. Marilyn McCord Adams (1989). Ockham on Truth. Medioevo 16:143-72.
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  4. Marilyn McCord Adams (1978). Ockham's Theory of Natural Signification. The Monist 61 (3):444-459.
  5. Marilyn McCord Adams (1976). What Does Ockham Mean by `Supposition'? Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic 17 (3):375-391.
  6. Marilyn McCord Adams & Richard Cross (2005). Aristotelian Substance and Supposits. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 79:15 - 72.
    [Marilyn McCord Adams] In this paper I begin with Aristotle's Categories and with his apparent forwarding of primary substances as metaphysically special because somehow fundamental. I then consider how medieval reflection on Aristotelian change led medieval Aristotelians to analyses of primary substances that called into question how and whether they are metaphysically special. Next, I turn to a parallel issue about supposits, which Boethius seems in effect to identify with primary substances, and how theological cases-the doctrines of the Trinity, the (...)
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  7. Marilyn McCord Adams & Richard Cross (2005). What's Metaphysically Special About Supposits? Some Medieval Variations on Aristotelian Substance. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 79 (1):15–52.
  8. Claude Albert (2007). Mental Language and Tradition Encounters in Medieval Philosophy : Anselm, Albert and Ockham. In John Marenbon (ed.), The Many Roots of Medieval Logic: The Aristotelian and the Non-Aristotelian Traditions: Special Offprint of Vivarium 45, 2-3 (2007). Brill.
  9. Rudolph Allers (1947). Language and Myth. The Modern Schoolman 24 (4):241-246.
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  10. Ahmed Alwishah & David Sanson (2009). The Early Arabic Liar: The Liar Paradox in the Islamic World From the Mid-Ninth to the Mid-Thirteenth Centuries Ce. Vivarium (1):97-127.
    We describe the earliest occurrences of the Liar Paradox in the Arabic tradition. e early Mutakallimūn claim the Liar Sentence is both true and false; they also associate the Liar with problems concerning plural subjects, which is somewhat puzzling. Abharī (1200-1265) ascribes an unsatisfiable truth condition to the Liar Sentence—as he puts it, its being true is the conjunction of its being true and false—and so concludes that the sentence is not true. Tūsī (1201-1274) argues that self-referential sentences, like the (...)
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  11. Fabrizio Amerini (2013). Thomas Aquinas and Some Italian Dominicans (Francis of Prato, Georgius Rovegnatinus and Girolamo Savonarola) on Signification and Supposition. Vivarium 51 (1-4):327-351.
  12. Fabrizio Amerini (2011). Pragmatics and Semantics in Thomas Aquinas. Vivarium 49 (1-3):95-126.
    Thomas Aquinas's account of the semantics of names is based on two fundamental distinctions: the distinction between a name's mode of signifying and the signified object, and that between the cause and the goal of a name's signification, i.e. that from which a name was instituted to signify and that which a name actually signifies. Thomas endows names with a two-layer signification: names are introduced into language to designate primarily conceptions of extramental things and secondarily the particular extramental things referred (...)
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  13. Fabrizio Amerini (2009). William of Ockham and Mental Synonymy. The Case of Nugation. Franciscan Studies 67 (1):375-403.
  14. Fabrizio Amerini (2008). The Semantics of Substantial Names. Recherches de Théologie Et Philosophie Médiévales 75 (2):395-440.
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  15. Fabrizio Amerini (2005). What is Real. A Reply to Ockham's Ontological Program. Vivarium 43 (1):187-212.
    When Ockham's logic arrives in Italy, some Dominican philosophers bring into question Ockham's ontological reductionist program. Among them, Franciscus de Prato and Stephanus de Reate pay a great attention to refute Ockham's claim that no universal exists in the extra-mental world. In order to reject Ockham's program, they start by reconsidering the notion of 'real', then the range of application of the rational and the real distinction. Generally, their strategy consists in re-addressing against Ockham some arguments extracted from Hervaeus Natalis's (...)
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  16. H. Anzulewicz & G. Krieger (1997). Eine Guillelmus Anglicus Zugeschriebene Quaestio 'Utrum Iste Terminus 'Homo' Secundum Unam Rationem Indifferens Sit Ad Suppositia Eius Existentia Et Non Existentia'. Recherches de Théologie Et Philosophie Médiévales 64 (2):352-384.
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  17. Rüdiger Arnzen (2002). Ausgewählte Literatur in »weslichen« Sprachen für das Studium der mittelalterlichen Philosophie in arabischer und persischer Sprache. Bochumer Philosophisches Jahrbuch Fur Antike Und Mittelalter 7 (1):125-178.
  18. E. J. Ashwort (1991). Signification and Modes of Signifying in Thirteenth-Century Logic: A Preface to Aquinas on Analogy. Medieval Philosophy and Theology 1:39-67.
  19. E. J. Ashworth (2002). Le Discours Intérieur de Platon à Guillaume d'Ockham. Dialogue 41 (1):202-203.
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  20. E. J. Ashworth (1995). Suárez on the Analogy of Being: Some Historical Background. Vivarium 33 (1):50-75.
  21. E. J. Ashworth (1982). The Structure of Mental Language: Some Problems Discussed by Early Sixteenth Century Logicians. Vivarium 20 (1):59-83.
  22. E. J. Ashworth (1981). Mental Language and the Unity of Propositions: A Semantic Problem Discussed by Early Sixteenth Century Logicians. Franciscan Studies 41 (1):61-96.
  23. E. J. Ashworth (1980). Can I Speak More Clearly Than I Understand? A Problem of Religious Language in Henry of Ghent, Duns Scotus and Ockham. Historiographia Linguistica 7 (1/2):29-38.
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  24. E. J. Ashworth (1979). The "Libelli Sophistarum" and the Use of Medieval Logic Texts at Oxford and Cambridge in the Early Sixteenth Century. Vivarium 17 (2):134-158.
  25. E. J. Ashworth (1978). Theories of the Proposition: Some Early Sixteenth Century Discussions. Franciscan Studies 38 (1):81-121.
  26. E. J. Ashworth (1977). Chimeras and Imaginary Objects: A Study in the Post-Medieval Theory of Signification. Vivarium 15 (1):57-77.
  27. E. J. Ashworth (1976). I Promise You a Hoyse. Vivarium 14 (1):62-79.
  28. E. J. Ashworth (1974). 'For Riding is Required a Horse': A Problem of Meaning and Reference in Late Fifteenth and Early Sixteenth Century Logic. Vivarium 12 (2):146-172.
  29. E. J. Ashworth (1973). The Doctrine of Exponibilia in the Fifteenth and Sixteenth Centuries. Vivarium 11 (1):137-167.
  30. E. J. Ashworth (1969). The Doctrine of Supposition in the Sixteenth and Seventeenth Centuries. Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 51 (3):260-285.
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  31. E. Jennifer Ashworth (2013). Descent and Ascent From Ockham to Domingo de Soto: An Answer to Paul Spade. Vivarium 51 (1-4):385-410.
  32. E. Jennifer Ashworth (2010). Review of Joshua P. Hochschild, The Semantics of Analogy: Rereading Cajetan's De Nominum Analogia. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2010 (7).
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  33. E. Jennifer Ashworth (2007). Metaphor and the Logicians From Aristotle to Cajetan. Vivarium 45 (s 2-3):311-327.
    I examine the treatment of metaphor by medieval logicians and how it stemmed from their reception of classical texts in logic, grammar, and rhetoric. I consider the relation of the word 'metaphor' to the notions of translatio and transumptio, and show that it is not always synonymous with these. I also show that in the context of commentaries on the Sophistical Refutations metaphor was subsumed under equivocation. In turn, it was linked with the notion of analogy not so much in (...)
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  34. E. Jennifer Ashworth (2004). Medieval Theories of Analogy. In Edward N. Zalta (ed.), The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy. The Metaphysics Research Lab. 22.
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  35. E. Jennifer Ashworth (2003). Language and Logic. In Arthur Stephen McGrade (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Medieval Philosophy. Cambridge University Press. 73--96.
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  36. E. Jennifer Ashworth (1992). The Obligationes of John Tarteys: Edition and Introduction. Documenti E Studi Sulla Tradizione Filosofica Medievale 3:653-703.
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  37. E. Jennifer Ashworth (1988). The Historical Origins of John Poinsot's Treatise on Signs. Semiotica 69 (1/2):129-147.
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  38. Erline Jennifer Ashworth (1992). Analogy and Equivocation in Thirteenth-Century Logic: Aquinas in Context. Mediaeval Studies 54 (1):94-135.
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  39. Allan Bäck (2013). Avicenna's Theory of Supposition. Vivarium 51 (1-4):81-115.
  40. Allan Back (2011). Avicennas Hermeneutics. Vivarium 49 (1-3):9-25.
    Like Plato, Aristotle uses dialectic to interpret and analyze ordinary discourse as well as to ascend to the first principles of philosophy and science. At the same time he says that it is intellect ( noûs ) that apprehends the first principle. With al-Fārābī and Avicenna (Ibn Sīnā), dialectic becomes relegated to dealing with ordinary language. For them demonstration in an ideal language from principles apprehended by the intellect suffices for the philosopher.
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  41. Allan Bäck (1995). Five Texts on the Mediaeval Problem of Universals. Review of Metaphysics 49 (2):437-438.
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  42. Allan Bäck (1995). Joep Lameer, Al-Fārābī and Aristotelian Syllogistic: Greek Theory and Islamic Practice, Leiden-New York-Köln (E.J. Brill) 1994, XX + 351 P. ISBN 90-04-09884-. [REVIEW] Vivarium 33 (2):246-249.
  43. Allan Bäck (1983). Al-Farabi's Commentary and Short Treatise on Aristotle's de Interpretatione. Journal of the History of Philosophy 21 (3):396-398.
  44. Allen Bäck (1992). Avicenna's Conception of the Modalities. Vivarium 30 (2):217-255.
  45. Roger Bacon (1988). Compendium of the Study of Theology. E.J. Brill.
    INTRODUCTION If Roger Bacon is known for anything today it is for his association with the medieval beginnings of what we now call experimental science, ...
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  46. Paul J. J. M. Bakker (1996). Syncatégorèmes, Concepts, Équivocité. Vivarium 34 (1):76-131.
  47. J. D. Bastable (1956). William Ockham, Summa Logicae. Philosophical Studies 6:243-244.
  48. Bernardo Carlos Bazán (1979). La Signification des Termes Communs Et la Doctrine de la Supposition Chez Maître Siger de Brabant. Revue Philosophique de Louvain 77 (35):345-372.
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  49. Yann Benétreau-Dupin (forthcoming). Buridan's Solution to the Liar Paradox. History and Philosophy of Logic:1-11.
    Jean Buridan has offered a solution to the Liar Paradox, i.e. to the problem of assigning a truth-value to the sentence ‘What I am saying is false’. It has been argued that either (1) this solution is ad hoc since it would only apply to self-referencing sentences [Read, S. 2002. ‘The Liar Paradox from John Buridan back to Thomas Bradwardine’, Vivarium, 40 (2), 189–218] or else (2) it weakens his theory of truth, making his ‘a logic without truth’ [Klima, G. (...)
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  50. Mario Bertagna (1994). La teoria dell'inferenza nelle opere di Richard Ferrybridge. Documenti E Studi Sulla Tradizione Filosofica Medievale 5:523-556.
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1 — 50 / 459