This category needs an editor. We encourage you to help if you are qualified.
Volunteer, or read more about what this involves.
Related categories
Subcategories:
1807 found
Search inside:
(import / add options)   Sort by:
1 — 50 / 1807
Material to categorize
  1. Andrea Fiamma (2010). Commento al De visione Dei di Nicola Cusano. Rivista di Ascetica E Mistica 1:35–82.
    Il lavoro consiste in una particolare rilettura del testo cusaniano, nella quale si cerca di evidenziare, tra le altre fonti, soprattutto la presenza di Meister Eckhart. La “discesa” nel fondo dell'anima è presentata come il culmine teoretico di quel cammino di visione a cui e-duca l'aegnima dell'icona. Per queste ragioni l'articolo punta sull'influsso della mistica speculativa in campo teoretico e di quella dottrina che M. Eckhart chiama “Generazione del Logos nell'anima”. Tale trattazione apre poi il senso dell'ampia sezione dedicata alla (...)
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Robert Pasnau & Christina Van Dyke (eds.) (2010). The Cambridge History of Medieval Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.
  3. James Wetzel (2002). Will and Interiority in Augustine. Augustinian Studies 33 (2):139-160.
Medieval Ethics
  1. Peter Abelard (2001). Peter Abelard: Collationes. Clarendon Press.
    Peter Abelard (1079-1142) is widely recognized as one of the most important writers of the twelfth century, famed for his skill in logic as well as his romance with Heloise. Even among Abelard's writings, the Collationes - or Dialogue between a Christian, a Philosopher, and a Jew - are remarkable for their daring and intellectual imaginativeness. Written probably c.1130, the work contains the fullest exposition of many aspects of abelard's ethics, the only statement of his unusual eschatological theory, and some (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Marilyn McCord Adams (1986). The Structure of Ockham's Moral Theory. Franciscan Studies 46 (1):1-35.
  3. Marilyn McCord Adams & Rega Wood (1981). Is To Will It as Bad as To Do It?: The Fourteenth Century Debate. Franciscan Studies 41 (1):5-60.
  4. Justin M. Anderson (2012). Aquinas on The Graceless Unbeliever. Freiburger Zeitschrift für Philosophie Und Theologie 59 (1):5-25.
    This paper argues against the current presentation of Aquinas’s conception of pagan virtue because that conception fails to take into account the full weight of the corruption of the goods of nature on which the virtuous unbeliever must found his good acts. I go on to establish that postlapsarian man is in too capricious a position realistically to maintain a prolonged life of virtue. I conclude that while Aquinas’s conception of virtue renders a much more pessimistic picture of the virtuous (...)
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. J. B. (1971). Aquinas and Natural Law. Review of Metaphysics 24 (3):546-547.
  6. Judith Barad (1991). Aquinas on the Role of Emotion in Moral Judgment and Activity. The Thomist 55 (3):397-413.
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. K. L. Becker (1968). The Resurrection and Saint Augustine's Theology of Human Values. By Henri Irenee Marrou. Modern Schoolman 46 (1):85-86.
  8. Pavel Blažek (2008). The Virtue of Virginity : The Aristotelian Challenge. In István Pieter Bejczy (ed.), Virtue Ethics in the Middle Ages: Commentaries on Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics, 1200 -1500. Brill.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. John Boler (1990). The Moral Psychology of Duns Scotus: Some Preliminary Questions. Franciscan Studies 50 (1):31-56.
  10. Vernon J. Bourke (1991). Boethius's "In Ciceronis Topica." Translated with Notes and an Introduction by Eleonore Stump. Modern Schoolman 68 (4):345-346.
  11. Vernon J. Bourke (1984). Ethica Thomistica: The Moral Philosophy of Thomas Aquinas. By Ralph McInerny. Modern Schoolman 62 (1):64-64.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Vernon J. Bourke (1978). Joy in Augustine's Ethics. The Saint Augustine Lecture Series:9-55.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Vernon J. Bourke (1970). Voluntarism in Augustine's Ethico-Legal Thought. Augustinian Studies 1:3-17.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Vernon J. Bourke (1965). "Commentary on the Nicomachean Ethics," 2 Vols., by St. Thomas Aquinas, Trans. C. I. Litzinger, O.P. Modern Schoolman 43 (1):72-74.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Anne-Marie Bowery (2001). St. Augustine's Dilemma. Grace and Eternal Law in the Major Works of Augustine of Hippo. Augustinian Studies 32 (1):147-150.
  16. Joseph M. Boyle, Jr (1975). Aquinas and Prescriptive Ethics. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 49:82-95.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Stephen L. Brock (2009). REVIEWS-Lawrence Dewan, OP, Wisdom, Law and Virtue: Essays in Thomistic Ethics. The Thomist 73 (3):497.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Bonaventure A. Brown (1964). Moral Theology (Review). Franciscan Studies 6 (1):118-119.
  19. Oscar J. Brown (1979). Aquinas' Doctrine of Slavery in Relation to Thomistic Teaching on Natural Law. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 53:173-181.
  20. Peter Burnell (1995). Concupiscence and Moral Freedom in Augustine and Before Augustine. Augustinian Studies 26 (1):49-63.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Thomas A. Cavanaugh (forthcoming). Aquinas's Account of Double Effect. The Thomist.
    Double-effect reasoning (DER) is attributed to Aquinas "tout court". Aquinas's account, however, differs from contemporary DER insofar as Thomas considers the ethical status of "risking" an assailant's life while contemporary accounts focus on actions causing harm inevitably. Since one cannot claim to risk the inevitable, and since there is a significant difference between risking harm and causing harm inevitably. Thomas's account does not extend to cases of inevitable harm. Thus, the received understanding of Aquinas's account is flawed and leads to (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Anthony Celano (2013). The Relation of Prudence and Synderesis to Happiness in the Medieval Commentaries on Aristotle's Ethics. In Jon Miller (ed.), The Reception of Aristotle's Ethics. Cambridge University Press.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Mary T. Clark (1980). Joy in Augustine's Ethics. Augustinian Studies 11:230-232.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Richard A. Crofts (1973). The Common Good in the Political Theory of Thomas Aquinas. The Thomist 37:155-73.
  25. Mary Beth Ingham Csj (2008). Self-Mastery and Rational Freedom: Duns Scotus's Contribution to the Usus Pauper Debate. Franciscan Studies 66 (1):337-369.
  26. O. F. M. Davies (1998). Ethical Writings: Ethics and A Dialogue Between a Philosopher, a Jew, and a Christian by Peter Abelard. (Review). Franciscan Studies 55 (1):349-351.
  27. M. V. Dougherty (2002). Thomas Aquinas and Divine Command Theory. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 76:153-164.
    Nearly all attempts to include Aquinas among the class of divine command theorists have focused on two kinds of texts: those exhibiting Aquinas’s treatment of the apparent immoralities of the patriarchs (e.g., Abraham’s intention to kill Isaac), and those pertaining to Aquinas’s discussion of the divine will. In the present paper, I lay out a third approach unrelated to these two. I argue that Aquinas’s explicit endorsement of one ethical proposition as self-evident throughout his writings is sufficient justification to include (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. John P. Doyle (1993). Augustine and the Limits of Virtue. Review of Metaphysics 47 (2):396-397.
  29. P. S. Eardley (2006). Conceptions of Happiness and Human Destiny in the Late Thirteenth Century. Vivarium 44 (s 2-3):276-304.
    Medieval theories of ethics tended on the whole to regard self-perfection as the goal of human life. However there was profound disagreement, particularly in the late thirteenth century, over how exactly this was to be understood. Intellectualists such as Aquinas famously argued that human perfection lay primarily in coming to know the essence of God in the next life. Voluntarists such as the Franciscan John Peckham, by contrast, argued that ultimate perfection was to be achieved in patria through the act (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Leo J. Elders (2003). Pope, Stephen J., Ed. The Ethics of Aquinas. Review of Metaphysics 57 (1):175-176.
  31. Leo J. Elders (2001). Bowlin, John. Contingency and Fortune in Aquinas's Ethics. Review of Metaphysics 54 (4):905-906.
  32. Girard J. Etzkorn (1998). C.S.J. The Harmony of Goodness. Mutuality and Moral Living According to John Duns Scotus by M. B. Ingham (Review). Franciscan Studies 55 (1):356-359.
  33. S. F. (2003). David A. Lines Aristotle's Ethics in the Italian Universities (Ca. 1300–1650): The Universities and the Problem of Moral Education. (Leiden: E. J. Brill, 2002). Pp. XIX+614. €120.00/$140.00 (Hbk). ISBN 900 412085. [REVIEW] Religious Studies 39 (1):123-124.
  34. Thomas Feehan (1990). The Morality of Lying in St. Augustine. Augustinian Studies 21:67-81.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Thomas D. Feehan (1988). Augustine on Lying and Deception. Augustinian Studies 19:131-139.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Rory Fox (2007). Conscience and Other Virtues: From Bonaventure to Macintyre. By Douglas C. Langston. Heythrop Journal 48 (1):141–143.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. William A. Frank (1987). Duns Scotus on the Will and Morality. Review of Metaphysics 41 (1):131-133.
  38. Hester Goodenough Gelber (2000). Revisiting the Theater of Virtue. Franciscan Studies 58 (1):19-36.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. William A. Gerhard (1945). The Intellectual Virtue of Prudence. The Thomist 8:413-456.
  40. Keith Green (2013). Aquinas on Hating Sin in Summa Theologiae II-II Q34 A3 and I-II Q23 A1. [REVIEW] Sophia 52 (4):601-623.
    This essay explores the phenomenological features of the passional response to evil that Aquinas calls ‘hatred of sin’ in Summa Thelogiae II-II Q34 A3 and I-II Q23 A1, among other places. Social justice concerns and philosophical objections, however, challenge the notion that one can feel hatred toward an agent’s vice or sin without it being the agent who is hated. I argue that a careful, contextual reading of these texts shows that Aquinas cannot be read as commending ‘hate’ in any (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Michał Głowala (2012). What Kind of Power is Virtue? John of St. Thomas OP on Causality of Virtues and Vices. Studia Neoaristotelica 9 (1):25-57.
    The following paper discusses John of St. Thomas’ study of the way in which a habit (moral or epistemic virtue or vice) is a cause of an action it prompts. I begin with contrasting the question of causality of habits with the general question of the causal relevance of dispositions (2). I argue that habits constitute a very peculiar kind of dispositions marked by the connection with the properties of being difficult and being easy, and there are some special reasons (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Brooke Heidenreich Findley (2006). Does the Habit Make the Nun? A Case Study of Heloise's Influence on Abelard's Ethical Philosophy. Vivarium 44 (2-3):248-275.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Tobias Hoffmann (2013). The Pleasure of Life and the Desire for Non-Existence: Some Medieval Theories. Res Philosophica 90 (3):323-346.
    Are there subjective or objective conditions under which human life is not worth living? Or does human life itself contain the conditions that make it worth living? To find answers to these questions, this paper explores Bonaventure, Thomas Aquinas, Richard of Mediavilla, and John Duns Scotus, who discuss whether the damned in hell can, should, and do prefer non-existence over their existence in pain and moral evil. In light of Aristotle’s teaching that there is a certain pleasure inherent to life (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Steven J. Jensen (2012). The Problem of Negligent Omissions: Medieval Action Boethius and Anselm, Michael Barnwell. Modern Schoolman 89 (3-4):259-262.
  45. Bonnie Kent (1986). The Good Will According to Gerald Odonis, Duns Scotus, and William of Ockham. Franciscan Studies 46 (1):119-139.
  46. Peter King (1995). Abelard's Intentionalist Ethics. Modern Schoolman 72 (2-3):213-231.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Douglas C. Langston (2008). The Aristotelian Background to Scotus's Rejection of the Necessary Connection of Prudence and the Moral Virtues. Franciscan Studies 66 (1):317-336.
1 — 50 / 1807