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  1. Karen Bjelland (1988). Franciscan Versus Dominican Responses to the Knight as a Societal Model: The Case of the "South English Legendary". Franciscan Studies 48 (1):11-27.
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  2. James M. Blythe (2002). Aristotle's Politics and Ptolemy of Lucca. Vivarium 40 (1):103-136.
  3. Vernon J. Bourke (1974). Aquinas and Recent Theories of Right. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 48:187-197.
  4. Vernon J. Bourke (1931). The Political Philosophy of St. Augustine. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 7:45-55.
  5. Brockwell (1977). Augustine's Ideal of Monastic Community. Augustinian Studies 8:91-109.
  6. Oscar J. Brown (1979). Aquinas' Doctrine of Slavery in Relation to Thomistic Teaching on Natural Law. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 53:173-181.
  7. Richard A. Crofts (1973). The Common Good in the Political Theory of Thomas Aquinas. The Thomist 37:155-73.
  8. Frank de la Vega (1959). Augustine, Philosopher of Freedom. New Scholasticism 33 (4):538-540.
  9. Rumold Fennessy (1957). Guillelmi de Ockham Opera Politica. Vol. III. Philosophical Studies 7:177-177.
  10. Ernest L. Fortin (1971). Political Idealism and Christianity in the Thought of St. Augustine. The Saint Augustine Lecture Series:1-38.
  11. Ernest L. Fortin (1970). The Political Implications of St. Augustine's Theory of Conscience. Augustinian Studies 1:133-152.
  12. Timothy Fuller (1990). Compatibilities on the Idea of Law in Thomas Aquinas and Thomas Hobbes. Hobbes Studies 3 (1):112-134.
  13. Joan Gibson (1989). Educating for Silence: Renaissance Women and the Language Arts. Hypatia 4 (1):9 - 27.
    In the Renaissance, educating for philosophy was integrated with educating for an active role in society, and both were conditioned by the prevailing educational theories based on humanist revisions of the trivium. I argue that women's education in the Renaissance remained tied to grammar while the education of men was directed toward action through eloquence. This is both a result of and a condition for the greater restriction on the social opportunities for women.
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  14. William Graham (2000). Augustine and the Limits of Politics. Dialogue 39 (1):175-176.
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  15. John Kilcullen, Medieval Political Theory.
    Every intellectual discipline constructs and reconstructs its own history, as writings not previously regarded as important get into reading lists and others fall out. Until recently students of political theory were urged to read Plato and Aristotle, and then Hobbes and Locke, but nothing, or very little, between the Greeks and the early moderns. Those who have ventured into this gap have found that, at least from the thirteenth century, there was a good deal of political theory, with clear links (...)
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  16. George Knysh (2000). Ockham's First Political Treatise?: The Impugnatio Constitutionum Papae Iohannis [April/May 1328]. Franciscan Studies 58 (1):237-259.
  17. Roberto Lambertini (2002). Raimundus Acgerii's Commentary on Aristotle's Politics: Some Notes. Vivarium 40 (1):14-40.
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  18. George J. Lavere (1981). The Influence of Saint Augustine on Early Medieval Political Theory. Augustinian Studies 12:1-9.
  19. George J. Lavere (1980). The Political Realism of Saint Augustine. Augustinian Studies 11:135-144.
  20. David A. Lenihan (1996). The Influence of Augustine's Just War. Augustinian Studies 27 (1):55-93.
  21. David A. Lenihan (1988). The Just War Theory in the Work of Saint Augustine. Augustinian Studies 19:37-70.
  22. Anthony J. Lisska & Maria Theresa (forthcoming). The Common Good in the Political Theory of Thomas Aquinas. The Thomist.
    This study investigates the function of the common good in the political theory of thomas aquinas. it concludes that at every point in his political theory the concept of the common good plays a significant, if not determinative role. his moderate position between collectivism and individualism recognizes that the individual lives in social relationships which include social responsibilities.
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  23. Costantino Marmo (1997). Bacon, Aristotle (and All the Others) on Natural Inferential Signs. Vivarium 35 (2):136-154.
  24. Berard Marthaler (1956). Grace and Original Justice According to St. Thomas (Review). Franciscan Studies 16 (3):307-308.
  25. Roman Míčka (2009). Faith and Liberty. The Economic Thought of the Late Scholastics. Studia Neoaristotelica 6 (1):138-153.
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  26. Moorhouse F. X. Millar (1929). St. Augustine and Cicero's Definition of the State. Thought 4 (2):254-266.
  27. Moorhouse I. X. Millar (1930). St. Augustine and Political Theory. Thought 5 (2):272-280.
  28. John B. Morrall (1949). Some Note's on a Recent Interpretation of William of Ockham's Political Philosophy. Franciscan Studies 9 (4):335-369.
  29. Cary J. Nederman (2002). Mechanics and Citizens: The Reception of the Aristotelian Idea of Citizenship in Late Medieval Europe. Vivarium 40 (1):75-102.
  30. Cary J. Nederman (1986). The Aristotelian Doctrine of the Mean and John of Salisbury's Concept of Liberty. Vivarium 24 (2):128-142.
  31. Robert J. O'Connell (1963). The Political and Social Ideas of St. Augustine. International Philosophical Quarterly 3 (4):631-632.
  32. Francis Oakley (1998). The Absolute and Ordained Power of God and King in the Sixteenth and Seventeenth Centuries: Philosophy, Science, Politics, and Law. Journal of the History of Ideas 59 (4):669-690.
  33. Thomas M. Osborne Jr (2000). Dominium Politicum Et Regale: Sir John Fortescue's Solution to the Problem of Tyranny as Presented by Thomas Aquinas and Ptolemy of Lucca. Mediaeval Studies 62:161-187.
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  34. Petrus (1967). The Commentary of Peter of Auvergne on Aristotle's Politics. Rome, Desclée; Pont. Univ. Of St. Thomas Aq..
  35. John O. Riedl (1963). Thomas Aquinas on Citizenship. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 37:159-167.
  36. Andrea A. Robiglio (2006). The Thinker as a Noble Man (Bene Natus) and Preliminary Remarks on the Medieval Concepts of Nobility. Vivarium 44 (s 2-3):205-247.
    The late medieval discussion of 'nobility' (= nobilitas, dignitas) defined in philosophical terms (as opposed to other social notions like 'aristocracy'), produced a large number of writings, many of which are still unedited. Nevertheless, modern philosophical historiography (developed throughout the seventeenth century and reaching its first apogee with Hegel) has neglected the conceptual debates on nobility. Perhaps having assumed it to be a dead relic of the 'pre-illuminist' past, historians and philosophers understood 'nobility' as a non-philosophical issue and so it (...)
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  37. Ansgar Santogrossi (1990). Duns Scotus' Political and Economic Philosophy. Review of Metaphysics 44 (2):433-435.
  38. Christian Schäfer (2002). Juan Ginés de Sepúlveda Und Die Politische Aristotelesrezeption Im Zeitalter der Conquista. Vivarium 40 (2):242-271.
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  39. Sally J. Scholz (1996). Civil Disobedience in the Social Theory of Thomas Aquinas. The Thomist 60 (3):449-462.
    In this article I define civil disobedience and classify it into four forms based on motive and extent of dissent. I then present Thomas Aquinas's account for justified civil disobedience. After first determining how a law or system of laws is unjust, the duty (virtue) of obedience to just and unjust laws is discussed. Finally, I argue that of the four possible forms of civil disobedience, Aquinas's natural Law Theory only clearly allows the fourth, i.e., altruistic disobedience of an unjust (...)
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  40. Anthony Soto (1952). The Structure of Society According to Duns Scotus. Franciscan Studies 12 (1):71-90.
  41. Georgios Steiris (2014). Anthropologie, Religion und Politik in der praktischen Philosophie al-Fārābīs und in den politischen Traktaten Machiavellis. In M. Stork V. Pantazis (ed.), Ommasin allois, Festschrift für Professor Ioannis E. Theodoropoulos zum 65. Geburtstag. Oldib Verlag. 151-189.
    Die ethische und politische Philosophie al-Fārābīs beruht auf einer philosophischen Anthropologie, die die Menschen als von Natur aus als ungleich betrachtet und der Natur eine fundamentale Bedeutung zuschreibt. Die Natur stattet nur wenige Menschen mit besonderen Fähigkeiten aus, sodass die Verwirklichung der höheren theoretischen, geistigen, moralischen Tugend und der praktischen Kunst nur jene betrifft, die von der Natur dafür ausersehen wurden. Die Anthropologie ist darüber hinaus auch ein wichtiges Instrument politischen Handelns. Der Herrscher muss sich kontinuierlich dem Studium der menschlichen (...)
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  42. Jan Van Laarhoven (1994). Titles and Subtitles of the Policraticus a Proposal. Vivarium 32 (2):131-160.
    Introduction and Prologue 489 lines Part I. Officials and their ado. total: 6.214 lines Bk. 1. Curial occupations: 1.309 lines a) starting-point 3 ch.: 70 l. b) games 5 ch.: 820 l. c) varieties of magic 5 ch.: 419 l. Bk. 2. The truth of signs: prol.: 14 1. 3.116 lines a) true and false signs 3 ch.: 142 1. b) exc.: Jerusalem A.D. 70 6 ch.: 385 1. c) sequel: signs 5 ch.: 127 l. d) dreams 3 ch.: 386 (...)
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  43. Cesare Vasoli (1976). The Political Thought of William of Ockham: Personal and Institutional Principles. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Philosophy 14 (2):230-233.
  44. M. W. (1965). The Political and Social Ideas of St. Augustine. Review of Metaphysics 19 (1):150-151.
  45. Ruth Webb (1989). The Nomoi of Gemistos Plethon in the Light of Plato's Laws. Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes 52:214-219.
  46. Paul J. Weithman (1989). St. Thomas Aquinas on Politics and Ethics. Review of Metaphysics 42 (3):638-640.
  47. Rega Wood (1992). Richard Rufus of Comwall on Creation: The Reception of Aristotelian Physics in the West. Medieval Philosophy and Theology 2:1-30.
  48. Herbert Wright (1931). St. Augustine and International Peace. Thought 6 (3):399-416.