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Mental Illness

Edited by Serife Tekin (University of Pittsburgh, Dalhousie University, Daemen College)
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  1. Ahmad Abu-Akel (2008). Theory of Mind in Autism, Schizophrenia, and in-Between. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 31 (3):261-262.
    Autism and schizophrenia are presented as the extremes of disorders affecting the social brain. By viewing human cognition impairment in terms of competence and performance, a variety of social brain disorders can be identified along the autistic-psychotic continuum.
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  2. G. Adshead (1999). Ethical Issues in Mental Illness. Journal of Medical Ethics 25 (1):67-68.
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  3. Gwen Adshead (1999). Psychopaths and Other-Regarding Beliefs. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 6 (1):41-44.
  4. James Aho & Kevin Aho (2008). Body Matters: A Phenomenology of Sickness, Disease, and Illness. Lexington Books.
    Written in a jargon-free way, Body Matters provides a clear and accessible phenomenological critique of core assumptions in mainstream biomedicine and explores ways in which health and illness are experienced and interpreted differently in various socio-historical situations. By drawing on the disciplines of literature, cultural anthropology, sociology, medical history, and philosophy, the authors attempt to dismantle common presuppositions we have about human afflictions and examine how the methods of phenomenology open up new ways to interpret the body and to re-envision (...)
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  5. O. F. Aina (2004). Mental Illness and Cultural Issues in West African Films: Implications for Orthodox Psychiatric Practice. Medical Humanities 30 (1):23-26.
    The portrayal of psychiatry and of the activities of supernatural forces in indigenous films produced in West Africa was critically examined in this study. Most often the content of these films is centred on African culture, African mythical stories, or real life events. Over a three year period, 163 such films were studied. Twenty five of them contained scenes of psychiatric illness. In 24 of these, there were “cases of psychoses”; and the remaining one was that of “deliberate self harm” (...)
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  6. Zac Alstin (2011). Locked-in Happiness. Bioethics Research Notes 23 (1):11.
    Alstin, Zac Results of a Belgian study have revealed that a large number of people suffering from Locked-In Syndrome are happy. Disability is foremost a challenge to one's values, not to our happiness.
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  7. Norbert Andersch (forthcoming). Symbolic Form and Mental Illness-An Altered Approach to Mental Illness. Philosophy.
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  8. Anonymous (2007). Recollections of a Journey Through a Psychotic Episode: Or, Mental Illness and Creativity. Mens Sana Monographs 5 (1):188.
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  9. Kathryn E. Artnak (2008). Ethics Consultation in Dual Diagnosis of Mental Illness and Mental Retardation: Medical Decisionmaking for Community-Dwelling Persons. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 17 (02):239-246.
    An evaluation of mental capacity is critical to a clinician's judgment about whether or not persons can make medical treatment decisions on their own behalf, and uncertainty about their ability to meaningfully participate in that process is one of the more common reasons an ethics consult is requested. The care of decisionally incapable patients—particularly those who lack advance care documents and no living relative who can speak for them—presents a quandary to healthcare personnel attempting to plan care in their best (...)
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  10. Iep Author, Mental Illness, Philosophy Of.
    Philosophy of Mental Illness The Philosophy of Mental Illness is an interdisciplinary field of study that combines views and methods from the philosophy of mind, psychology, neuroscience, and moral philosophy in order to analyze the nature of mental illness. Philosophers of mental illness are concerned with examining the ontological, epistemological, and normative issues arising from […].
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  11. Kent Bach (1993). Emotional Disorder and Attention. In George Graham (ed.), Philosophical Psychopathology. Cambridge: MIT Press.
    Some would say that philosophy can contribute more to the occurrence of mental disorder than to the study of it. Thinking too much does have its risks, but so do willful ignorance and selective inattention. Well, what can philosophy contribute? It is not equipped to enumerate the symptoms and varieties of disorder or to identify their diverse causes, much less offer cures (maybe it can do that-personal philosophical therapy is now available in the Netherlands). On the other hand, the scientific (...)
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  12. Alan Baddeley (2007). Working Memory, Thought, and Action. Oup Oxford.
    'Working Memory, Thought, and Action' is the magnum opus of one of the most influential cognitive psychologists of the past 50 years. This new volume on the model he created discusses the developments that have occurred within the model in the past twenty years, and places it within a broader context.
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  13. James M. Badger, Rosalind Ekman Ladd & Glenn R. Friedemann (2012). The Hospitalized Prisoner With a Life-Threatening Illness. Jona’s Healthcare Law, Ethics, and Regulation 14 (2):43-47.
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  14. Christopher Bagley (1971). Mental Illness in Immigrant Minorities in London. Journal of Biosocial Science 3 (4):449-459.
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  15. Andrew R. Bailey (1997). Neurosis. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 11 (2):51-61.
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  16. J. P. Balodhi (ed.) (2002). Application of Oriental Philosophical Thoughts in Mental Health. National Institute of Mental Health and Neuro Sciences.
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  17. Ralf-Peter Behrendt (2005). Attentional Deficit Versus Impaired Reality Testing: What is the Role of Executive Dysfunction in Complex Visual Hallucinations? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (6):758-759.
    A “multifactorial” model should accommodate a psychological perspective, aiming to relate the phenomenology of complex visual hallucinations not only to neurobiological findings but also an understanding of the patient's psychological problems and situation in life. Greater attention needs to be paid to the role of the “lack of insight” patients may have into their hallucinations and its relationship to cognitive impairment.
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  18. Gillian Bendelow (2004). Sociology and Concepts of Mental Illness. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 11 (2):145-146.
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  19. Fabrice Berna, Mehdi Bennouna-Greene, Jevita Potheegadoo, Paulina Verry, Martin A. Conway & Jean-Marie Danion (2011). Impaired Ability to Give a Meaning to Personally Significant Events in Patients with Schizophrenia. Consciousness and Cognition 20 (3):703-711.
    Schizophrenia is a severe mental illness affecting sense of identity. Autobiographical memory deficits observed in schizophrenia could contribute to this altered sense of identity. The ability to give a meaning to personally significant events is also critical for identity construction and self-coherence. Twenty-four patients with schizophrenia and 24 control participants were asked to recall five self-defining memories. We assessed meaning making in participants’ narratives and afterwards asked them explicitly to give a meaning to their memories . We found that both (...)
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  20. Pamela Bjorklund (2004). 'There but for the Grace of God': Moral Responsibility and Mental Illness. Nursing Philosophy 5 (3):188-200.
  21. Elizabeth H. Flanagan Roger K. Blashfield (2007). Clinicians' Folk Taxonomies of Mental Disorders. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 14 (3):pp. 249-269.
    Using methods from anthropology and cognitive psychology, this study investigated the relationship between clinicians’ folk taxonomies of mental disorder and the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM). Expert and novice psychologists were given sixty-seven DSM-IV diagnoses, asked to discard unfamiliar diagnoses, put the remaining diagnoses into groups that had “similar treatments” using hierarchical (making more inclusive and less inclusive groups) and dimensional (placing groups in a two-dimensional space) methodologies, and give names to the groups in their taxonomies. Clinicians (...)
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  22. Elizabeth H. Flanagan Roger K. Blashfield (2007). Should Clinicians' Views of Mental Illness Influence the DSM? Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 14 (3):pp. 285-287.
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  23. Suzanne M. Phillips Monique D. Boivin (2007). Hildegard and Holism. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 14 (4):pp. 377-379.
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  24. Suzanne M. Phillips Monique D. Boivin (2007). Medieval Holism: Hildegard of Bingen on Mental Disorder. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 14 (4):pp. 359-368.
    Current efforts to think holistically about mental disorder may be assisted by considering the integrative strategies used by Hildegard of Bingen, a twelfth-century abbess and healer. We search for integrative strategies in the detailed records of Hilde-gard’s treatment of the noblewoman Sigewiza and in Hildegard’s more general writings. Three strategies support Hildegard’s holistic thinking: the use of narrative approaches to mental illness, acknowledging interdependence between perspectives, and applying principles of balance to the relationships between perspectives. Applying these three strategies to (...)
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  25. Derek Bolton (2013). What is Mental Illness? In K. W. M. Fulford (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy and Psychiatry. Oxford University Press. 434.
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  26. Derek Bolton (2001). Problems in the Definition of 'Mental Disorder'. Philosophical Quarterly 51 (203):182-199.
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  27. Jenifer Booth, Pre-Modern Ethics, Authoritative Narratives, and the Tribunal. The Oxford Handbook of Psychiatric Ethics.
    This chapter applies the modified philosophy of Alasdair MacIntyre to mental health law, and in particular to the mental health tribunal. The natural law approach of Thomas Aquinas is used to assist in this. It is argued that, for law to be just in pre-modern terms, it requires that it be assessed as rational together with the care it supports as a single entity. As such, according to a modified version of the Thomistic Aristotelian ethics of MacIntyre, justice would require (...)
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  28. Lisa Bortolotti (2011). Shaking the Bedrock. Philosophy Psychiatry Psychology 18 (1):77-87.
    In this paper, I articulate the thesis that most delusional beliefs are continuous with other irrational beliefs. Any interpreter with some knowledge about the cognitive and affective life of subjects with delusions can at least partially understand their reports, and explain and predict their behavior in intentional terms. I identify similarities and differences between this approach to the nature of delusions and the approach adopted by Rhodes and Gipps, who have recently defended the view that people with delusions do not (...)
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  29. Lisa Bortolotti (2009). Delusions and Other Irrational Beliefs. Oxford University Press.
    Delusions are a common symptom of schizophrenia and dementia. Though most English dictionaries define a delusion as a false opinion or belief, there is currently a lively debate about whether delusions are really beliefs and indeed, whether they are even irrational. The book is an interdisciplinary exploration of the nature of delusions. It brings together the psychological literature on the aetiology and the behavioural manifestations of delusions, and the philosophical literature on belief ascription and rationality. The thesis of the book (...)
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  30. Lisa Bortolotti & Matthew Broome (2012). Affective Dimensions of the Phenomenon of Double Bookkeeping in Delusions. Emotion Review 4 (2):187-191.
    It has been argued that schizophrenic delusions are “behaviourally inert.” This is evidence for the phenomenon of “double bookkeeping,” according to which people are not consistent in their commitment to the content of their delusions. The traditional explanation for the phenomenon is that people do not genuinely believe the content of their delusions. In the article, we resist the traditional explanation and offer an alternative hypothesis: people with delusions often fail to acquire or to maintain the motivation to act on (...)
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  31. Stephen Braude, The Creativity of Dissociation.
    This paper examines the complex and creative strategies employed in keeping beliefs, memories, and various other mental and bodily states effectively dissociated from normal waking consciousness. First, it examines cases of hypnotic anesthesia and hypnotically induced hallucination, which illustrate: (1) our capacity for generating novel mental contents, (2) our capacity for choosing a plan of action from a wider set of options, and (3) our capacity for monitoring and responding to environmental influences threatening to undermine a dissociative state. These observations (...)
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  32. David H. Brendel (2007). Beyond Engel: Clinical Pragmatism as the Foundation of Psychiatric Practice. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 14 (4):pp. 311-313.
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  33. David H. Brendel (2007). Psychophysical Causation and a Pragmatist Approach to Human Behavior. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 14 (3):pp. 205-207.
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  34. John Briere (1995). Child Abuse, Memory, and Recall: A Commentary. Consciousness and Cognition 4 (1):83-87.
  35. Matthew Broome & Lisa Bortolotti (2010). What's Wrong with 'Mental' Disorders? Psychological Medicine.
    Commentary on the editorial by D Stein et al.'s "What is a Mental/Psychiatric Disorder? From DSM-IV to DSM-V".
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  36. Matthew Broome & Lisa Bortolotti (2009). Mental Illness as Mental: A Defence of Psychological Realism. Humana.Mente 11:25-44.
    This paper argues for psychological realism in the conception of psychiatric disorders. We review the following contemporary ways of understanding the future of psychiatry: (1) psychiatric classification cannot be successfully reduced to neurobiology, and thus psychiatric disorders should not be conceived of as biological kinds; (2) psychiatric classification can be successfully reduced to neurobiology, and thus psychiatric disorders should be conceived of as biological kinds. Position (1) can lead either to instrumentalism or to eliminativism about psychiatry, depending on whether psychiatric (...)
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  37. Matthew Broome, Lisa Bortolotti & Matteo Mameli (2010). Moral Responsibility and Mental Illness: A Case Study. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 2 (19):179-187.
    It is far too early to say what global impact the neurocognitive and neuropsychiatric sciences will have on our intuitions about moral responsibility. And it is far too early to say whether the notion of moral responsibility will survive this impact (and if so, in what form). But it is certainly worth starting to think about the local impact that these sciences can or should have on some of our distinctions and criteria. It might be possible to use some of (...)
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  38. Robert Brown (1977). Physical Illness and Mental Health. Philosophy and Public Affairs 7 (1):17-38.
  39. Theodore M. Brown (2003). 13: George Engel and Rochester's Biopsychosocial Tradition: Historical and Developmental Perspectives. In Richard M. Frankel, Timothy E. Quill & Susan H. McDaniel (eds.), The Biopsychosocial Approach: Past, Present, and Future. University of Rochester Press. 199.
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  40. W. Brown (1985). A Critique Of Three Conceptions Of Mental Illness. Journal of Mind and Behavior 6 (4).
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  41. Bengt Brülde (2007). Art and Science, Facts and Knowledge. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 14 (2):pp. 111-127.
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  42. Bengt Brülde (2007). Mental Disorder and Values. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 14 (2):pp. 93-102.
    It is now generally agreed that we have to rely on value judgments to distinguish mental disorders from other conditions, but it is not quite clear how. To clarify this, we need to know more than to what extent attributions of disorder are dependent on values. We also have to know (1) what kind of evaluations we have to rely on to identify the class of mental disorder; (2) whether attributions of disorder contain any implicit reference to some specific evaluative (...)
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  43. Bengt Brülde & Filip Radovic (2006). Dysfunctions, Disabilities, and Disordered Minds. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 13 (2):133-141.
  44. Bengt Brülde & Filip Radovic (2006). What is Mental About Mental Disorder? Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 13 (2):99-116.
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  45. John Chynoweth Burnham (2006). A Clinical Alternative to the Public Health Approach to Mental Illness: A Forgotten Social Experiment. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 49 (2):220-237.
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  46. John Chynoweth Burnham (2006). A Clinical Alternative to the Public Health Approach to Mental Illness: A Forgotten Social Experiment. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 49 (2):220-237.
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  47. Edmund Byrne (1980). After “Mental Illness” What? A Philosophical Endorsement of Statutory Reform. Bowling Green Studies in Applied Philosophy 2:122-131.
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  48. Karina Pilar Trilles Calvo (2005). Prejuicios del tratamiento de lo psíquico: una visión fenomenológica. Logos 38:223-239.
    El objetivo fundamental de este artículo es poner de manifiesto los prejuicios que subyacen al tratamiento de la enfermedad mental. Empezamos definiendo cómo es nuestra vida en la "actitud natural ingenua" en la que aceptamos como naturales determinadas creencias sin fundamento. Defendemos que la epojé es el método adecuado para hacer presente ese compromiso. Tras determinar el método, describimos lo que le sucede a un enfermo mental en la consulta de un psiquiatra-psicólogo y, partiendo de esta situación, comenzamos a desentrañar (...)
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  49. Stefano Canali (2004). On the Concept of the Psychological. Topoi 23 (2):177-86.
    The idea that certain mental phenomena (e.g. emotions, depression, anxiety) can represent risk factors for certain somatic diseases runs through common thinking on the subject and through a large part of biomedical science. This idea still lies at the focus of the research tradition in psychosomatic medicine and in certain interdisciplinary approaches that followed it, such as psychoneuroimmunology. Nevertheless, the inclusion in the scientific literature of specifically mental phenomena in the list of risk factors pertaining to a specific pathological condition (...)
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  50. Alexander Caplan (2011). Recovery as Opportunity: Narrativity Theory and the Transport of Mental Illness. Gnosis 10 (1):1-10.
    This paper examines recovery from a narrative perspective. Narrativity theory is the view that life takes the form of a story. Human experience happens within an ongoing storyline. My aim here is not to indulge in disclosure or claim that I developed otherwise unattainable insight through the course of my illness. We will instead be looking at how the process of recovery brings on opportunities for moral understanding in the form of insights into the nature of suffering, increased sensitivity to (...)
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