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  1. R. Audi (1991). The Nature and Assessment of Practical Reasoning-a Reply to Barker, John and Foley, Richard. Behavior and Philosophy 19 (2):73-81.
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  2. B. J. Baars (1999). Art Must Move: Emotion and the Biology of Beauty. Journal of Consciousness Studies 6 (6-7):6-7.
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  3. David Barnett (2008). The Simplicity Intuition and Its Hidden Influence on Philosophy of Mind. Noûs 42 (2):308 - 335.
    Huxley’s Explanatory Gap: There can be no explanation of how states of consciousness arise from interaction among a collection of physical things.
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  4. Bert Baumgaertner (2012). Vagueness Intuitions and the Mobility of Cognitive Sortals. Minds and Machines 22 (3):213-234.
    One feature of vague predicates is that, as far as appearances go, they lack sharp application boundaries. I argue that we would not be able to locate boundaries even if vague predicates had sharp boundaries. I do so by developing an idealized cognitive model of a categorization faculty which has mobile and dynamic sortals (`classes', `concepts' or `categories') and formally prove that the degree of precision with which boundaries of such sortals can be located is inversely constrained by their flexibility. (...)
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  5. Richard B. Brandt (1954). Thinking and Experience. Review of Metaphysics 7 (4):632 - 643.
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  6. Manuel Bremer (2005). Lessons From Sartre for the Analytic Philosophy of Mind. Analecta Husserliana 88:63-85.
    There are positive and negative lessons from Sartre: - Taking up some of his ideas one may arrive at a better model of consciousness in the analytic philosophy of mind; representing some of his ideas within the language and the models of a functionalist theory of mind makes them more accessible and inte¬grates them into the wider picture. - Sartre, as any philosopher, errs at some points, I believe; but these errors may be instruc¬tive, especially in as much as they (...)
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  7. R. J. C. Burgener (1959). An Inspective Theory of Thinking. Review of Metaphysics 13 (1):175 - 184.
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  8. Michel Cabanac (1999). Emotion and Phylogeny. Journal of Consciousness Studies 6 (6-7):6-7.
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  9. Eric P. Charles, Michael D. Bybee & Nicholas S. Thompson (2011). Abehaviorist Account of Emotions and Feelings: Making Sense of James D. Laird's Feelings: The Perception of Self. Behavior and Philosophy 39:1-16.
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  10. Jonathan Cohen & Matthew Fulkerson (2014). Affect, Rationalization, and Motivation. Review of Philosophy and Psychology 5 (1):103-118.
    Recently, a number of writers have presented an argument to the effect that leading causal theories make available accounts of affect’s motivational role, but at the cost of failing to understand affect’s rationalizing role. Moreover, these writers have gone on to argue that these considerations support the adoption of an alternative (“evaluationist”) conception of pleasure and pain that, in their view, successfully explains both the motivational and rationalizing roles of affective experience. We believe that this argument from rationalization is ineffective (...)
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  11. Giovanna Colombetti (2009). What Language Does to Feelings. Journal of Consciousness Studies 16 (9):4-26.
    This paper distinguishes various ways in which language can act on our affect or emotion experience. From the commonsensical consideration that sometimes we use language merely to report or describe our feelings, I move on to discuss how language can constitute, clarify, and enhance them, as well as induce novel and oft surprising experiences. I also consider the social impact of putting feelings into words, including the reciprocal influences between emotion experience and the public dissemination of emotion labels and descriptions, (...)
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  12. Richard E. Creel (forthcoming). Radical Behaviorism, Feelings, and Beliefs. Behaviorism.
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  13. R. L. D. (1979). Emotion, Thought and Therapy. Review of Metaphysics 32 (4):763-765.
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  14. Leon de Bruin, Fleur Jongepier & Derek Strijbos (forthcoming). Mental Agency as Self-Regulation. Review of Philosophy and Psychology:1-11.
    The article proposes a novel approach to mental agency that is inspired by Victoria McGeer’s work on self-regulation. The basic idea is that certain mental acts (e.g., judging that p) leave further work to be done for an agent to be considered an authoritative self-ascriber of corresponding dispositional mental states (e.g., believing that p). First, we discuss Richard Moran’s account of avowals, which grounds first-person authority in deliberative, self-directed agency. Although this view is promising, we argue that it ultimately fails (...)
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  15. Dorothea Debus (2014). 'Mental Time Travel': Remembering the Past, Imagining the Future, and the Particularity of Events. Review of Philosophy and Psychology 5 (3):333-350.
    The present paper offers a philosophical discussion of phenomena which in the empirical literature have recently been subsumed under the concept of ‘mental time travel’. More precisely, the paper considers differences and similarities between two cases of ‘mental time travel’, recollective memories (‘R-memories’) of past events on the one hand, and sensory imaginations (‘S-imaginations’) of future events on the other. It develops and defends the claim that, because a subject who R-remembers a past event is experientially aware of a past (...)
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  16. A. E. Denham (1996). Metaphor and Judgements of Experience. European Review of Philosophy 3:225-253.
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  17. Stuart Derbyshire & Anand Raja (2011). On the Development of Painful Experience. Journal of Consciousness Studies 18 (9-10):9-10.
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  18. Richard Double (1996). Four Naturalist Accounts of Moral Responsibility. Behavior and Philosophy 24 (2):137 - 143.
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  19. John Drummond (2009). Feelings, Emotions, and Truly Perceiving the Valuable. Modern Schoolman 86 (3-4):363-379.
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  20. Thomas Dubay (1962). An Investigation Into the Thomistic Concept of Pleasure. New Scholasticism 36 (1):76-99.
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  21. Bill Faw (2009). Conflicting Intuitions May Be Based on Differing Abilities: Evidence From Mental Imaging Research. Journal of Consciousness Studies 16 (4):45-68.
    Much of the current imaging literature either denies the existence of wakeful non-mental imagers, views non-imagers motivationally as 'repressors' or 'neurotic', or acknowledges them but does not fully incorporate them into their models. Neurobiologists testing for imaging loss seem to assume that visual recognition, describing objects, and free-hand drawing require the forming of conscious images. The intuition that 'the psyche never thinks without an image.... the reasoning mind thinks its ideas in the form of images' (Aristotle) has a long tradition (...)
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  22. Jordi Fernández (2014). Memory and Immunity to Error Through Misidentification. Review of Philosophy and Psychology 5 (3):373-390.
    The aim of this paper is to defend the view that judgments based on episodic memory are immune to error through misidentification. I will put forward a proposal about the contents of episodic memories according to which a memory represents a perception of a past event. I will also offer a proposal about the contents of perceptual experiences according to which a perceptual experience represents some relations that its subject bears to events in the external world. The combination of the (...)
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  23. Owen Flanagan (2001). Dreaming Souls: Sleep, Dreams, and the Evolution of the Conscious Mind: Sleep, Dreams, and the Evolution of the Conscious Mind. Oup Usa.
    In Dreaming Souls, Owen Flanagan provides both an accessible survey of the latest research on sleep and dreams and a compelling new theory about the nature and function of dreaming. Flanagan argues that while sleep has a clear biological function and adaptive value, dreams are merely side effects, 'free-riders', irrelevant from an evolutionary point of view. But dreams are hardly unimportant. Indeed, Flanagan argues that dreams are self-expressive, the result of our need to find or create meaning, even when we (...)
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  24. Lucia Foglia & Rick Grush (2011). The Limitations of a Purely Enactive (Non-Representational) Account of Imagery. Journal of Consciousness Studies 18 (5-6):35 - 43.
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  25. Marina Folescu & James Higginbotham (2012). Two Takes on the De Se. In Simon Prosser & Francois Recanati (eds.), Immunity to Error Through Misidentification: New Essays. Cambridge University Press.
    In this article we consider, relying in part upon comparative semantic evidence from English and Romanian, two contrasting dimensions of the sense in which our thoughts, including the contents of imagination and memory, and extending to objects of fear, enjoyment, and other emotions directed toward worldly happenings, may be distinctively first-personal, or "de se," to use the terminology introduced in Lewis (1979), and exhibit the phenomenon of immunity to error through misidentification (hereafter: IEM) in the sense of Shoemaker (1968) and (...)
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  26. Richard Foley (1991). Audi on Practical Reasoning. Behavior and Philosophy 19 (2):59 - 72.
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  27. Harry Frankfurt (1982). The Importance of What We Care About. Synthese 53 (2):257-272.
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  28. Joan Franks (1992). Mind and Imagination in Aristotle. International Studies in Philosophy 24 (1):146-148.
  29. W. J. Freeman & R. Núñez (1999). Restoring Action, Intention and Emotion to Cognition. Journal of Consciousness Studies 6 (11/12).
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  30. Walter J. Freeman (1997). Happiness Doesnt Come in Bottles. Neuroscientists Learn That Joy Comes Through Dancing, Not Drugs. Journal of Consciousness Studies 4 (1):67-70.
    Too little has been written about the biology of joy. Most of the articles in the medical literature about brains and emotions are devoted to explaining how we feel fear, anger, anxiety and despair. This is understandable, because we don't go to doctors when we are feeling optimistic, happy and joyful. Most of what we know about the chemistry of our emotions has been learned from the disorders and the treatments of people who are sad and depressed. -/- But we (...)
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  31. Walter J. Freeman & Rafael Núñez (1999). Restoring to Cognition the Forgotten Primacy of Action, Intention and Emotion. Journal of Consciousness Studies 6 (11-12):11-12.
  32. Vittorio Gallese (2009). The Two Sides of Mimesis: Girards Mimetic Theory, Embodied Simulation and Social Identification. Journal of Consciousness Studies 16 (4):21-44.
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  33. Eileen Gavin (1981). Emotion. Philosophical Studies 28:401-403.
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  34. Eileen A. Gavin (1973). Exploring Emotion. Philosophical Studies 22:146-147.
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  35. Eugene Gendlin (2009). What First Third Person Processes Really Are. Journal of Consciousness Studies 16 (10-12):10-12.
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  36. Nicholas Georgalis (1990). Review: A Realist's Teleological View of Belief. [REVIEW] Behavior and Philosophy 18 (2):85 - 88.
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  37. Philip Gerrans & Klaus Scherer (2013). Wired for Despair The Neurochemistry of Emotion and the Phenomenology of Depression. Journal of Consciousness Studies 20 (7-8):7-8.
    Although depression is characterized as a mood disorder it turns out that, like moods in general, it cannot be explained independently of a theory of emotion. In this paper I outline one promising theory of emotion and show how it deals with the phenomenon of depressive mood. An important aspect of MAT is the role it assigns to peripheral information processing systems in setting up emotional responses. The operations of these systems are automatic and opaque to consciousness, but they represent (...)
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  38. Thomas Gilby (1960). The Imagination as a Means of Grace. Philosophical Studies 10 (10):288-288.
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  39. Peter Goldie (2011). Grief: A Narrative Account. Ratio 24 (2):119-137.
    Grief is not a kind of feeling, or a kind of judgement, or a kind of perception, or any kind of mental state or event the identity of which can be adequately captured at a moment in time. Instead, grief is a kind of process; more specifically, it is a complex pattern of activity and passivity, inner and outer, which unfolds over time, and the unfolding pattern over time is explanatorily prior to what is the case at any particular time. (...)
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  40. Geoffrey P. Goodwin & John M. Darley (2010). The Perceived Objectivity of Ethical Beliefs: Psychological Findings and Implications for Public Policy. [REVIEW] Review of Philosophy and Psychology 1 (2):161-188.
    Ethical disputes arise over differences in the content of the ethical beliefs people hold on either side of an issue. One person may believe that it is wrong to have an abortion for financial reasons, whereas another may believe it to be permissible. But, the magnitude and difficulty of such disputes may also depend on other properties of the ethical beliefs in question—in particular, how objective they are perceived to be. As a psychological property of moral belief, objectivity is relatively (...)
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  41. Robert M. Gordon (1990). Benefits and Costs of a Propositional Focus: Response to Deigh. Behavior and Philosophy 18 (2):57 - 60.
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  42. A. Graeser (2010). Willentlichkeit, Emotion, Sichtweisen. Philosophical Inquiry 32 (1-2):85-101.
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  43. Stephen Grant (2009). Feelings Are Not Enough. Journal of Consciousness Studies 16 (4):5-19.
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  44. O. H. Green (1983). Emotion. International Studies in Philosophy 15 (1):95-96.
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  45. Hunter Guthrie (1939). Max Scheler's Epistemology of the Emotions. Modern Schoolman 16 (3):51-54.
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  46. Alois Hahn (2010). Körper Und Gedächtnis. Vs Verlag für Sozialwissenschaften.
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  47. Valerie Gray Hardcastle (1999). It's Ok to Be Complicated: The Case of Emotion. Journal of Consciousness Studies 6 (11-12):237-249.
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  48. Daniel Harris (2011). Of Somethings and Nothings. International Philosophical Quarterly 51 (1):73-84.
    In philosophical discussions of emotion, feeling theories identify emotions with bodily events while cognitive theories insist that any coherent conception of emotion begins with acts of mind. The purpose of this paper is to argue the extent to which this debate is motivated by Cartesian considerations that unduly problematize the relationship between mind and body, and to suggest that in Wittgenstein we find resources for a view of emotions that overcomes this Cartesian problematic. My strategy is to show the important (...)
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  49. Edwin Hartman (1996). Emotion. The Ruffin Series in Business Ethics:135-137.
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  50. John Hartmann, The Aporia of Affection in Husserl's Analyses Concerning Passive and Active Synthesis.
    Husserl defines affection in the Analyses1 as "the allure given to consciousness, the particular pull that an object given to consciousness exercises on the ego."2 That something becomes prominent for the ego implies that the object exerts a kind of 'pull' upon the ego, a demanding of egoic attention. This affective pull is relative in force, such that the same object can be experienced in varying modes of prominence and affective relief depending upon bodily comportment, egoic attentiveness, etc. The phenomenon (...)
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