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Intuition* (282 | 31)
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  1. R. Audi (1991). The Nature and Assessment of Practical Reasoning-a Reply to Barker, John and Foley, Richard. Behavior and Philosophy 19 (2):73-81.
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  2. B. J. Baars (1999). Art Must Move: Emotion and the Biology of Beauty. Journal of Consciousness Studies 6 (6-7):6-7.
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  3. David Barnett (2008). The Simplicity Intuition and Its Hidden Influence on Philosophy of Mind. Noûs 42 (2):308 - 335.
    Huxley’s Explanatory Gap: There can be no explanation of how states of consciousness arise from interaction among a collection of physical things.
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  4. Bert Baumgaertner (2012). Vagueness Intuitions and the Mobility of Cognitive Sortals. Minds and Machines 22 (3):213-234.
    One feature of vague predicates is that, as far as appearances go, they lack sharp application boundaries. I argue that we would not be able to locate boundaries even if vague predicates had sharp boundaries. I do so by developing an idealized cognitive model of a categorization faculty which has mobile and dynamic sortals (`classes', `concepts' or `categories') and formally prove that the degree of precision with which boundaries of such sortals can be located is inversely constrained by their flexibility. (...)
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  5. Richard B. Brandt (1954). Thinking and Experience. Review of Metaphysics 7 (4):632 - 643.
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  6. Manuel Bremer (2005). Lessons From Sartre for the Analytic Philosophy of Mind. Analecta Husserliana 88:63-85.
    There are positive and negative lessons from Sartre: - Taking up some of his ideas one may arrive at a better model of consciousness in the analytic philosophy of mind; representing some of his ideas within the language and the models of a functionalist theory of mind makes them more accessible and inte¬grates them into the wider picture. - Sartre, as any philosopher, errs at some points, I believe; but these errors may be instruc¬tive, especially in as much as they (...)
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  7. Michel Cabanac (1999). Emotion and Phylogeny. Journal of Consciousness Studies 6 (6-7):6-7.
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  8. Eric P. Charles, Michael D. Bybee & Nicholas S. Thompson (2011). Abehaviorist Account of Emotions and Feelings: Making Sense of James D. Laird's Feelings: The Perception of Self. Behavior and Philosophy 39:1-16.
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  9. Jonathan Cohen & Matthew Fulkerson (2014). Affect, Rationalization, and Motivation. Review of Philosophy and Psychology 5 (1):103-118.
    Recently, a number of writers have presented an argument to the effect that leading causal theories make available accounts of affect’s motivational role, but at the cost of failing to understand affect’s rationalizing role. Moreover, these writers have gone on to argue that these considerations support the adoption of an alternative (“evaluationist”) conception of pleasure and pain that, in their view, successfully explains both the motivational and rationalizing roles of affective experience. We believe that this argument from rationalization is ineffective (...)
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  10. Giovanna Colombetti (2009). What Language Does to Feelings. Journal of Consciousness Studies 16 (9):4-26.
    This paper distinguishes various ways in which language can act on our affect or emotion experience. From the commonsensical consideration that sometimes we use language merely to report or describe our feelings, I move on to discuss how language can constitute, clarify, and enhance them, as well as induce novel and oft surprising experiences. I also consider the social impact of putting feelings into words, including the reciprocal influences between emotion experience and the public dissemination of emotion labels and descriptions, (...)
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  11. Richard E. Creel (forthcoming). Radical Behaviorism, Feelings, and Beliefs. Behaviorism.
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  12. R. L. D. (1979). Emotion, Thought and Therapy. Review of Metaphysics 32 (4):763-765.
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  13. Leon de Bruin, Fleur Jongepier & Derek Strijbos (forthcoming). Mental Agency as Self-Regulation. Review of Philosophy and Psychology:1-11.
    The article proposes a novel approach to mental agency that is inspired by Victoria McGeer’s work on self-regulation. The basic idea is that certain mental acts (e.g., judging that p) leave further work to be done for an agent to be considered an authoritative self-ascriber of corresponding dispositional mental states (e.g., believing that p). First, we discuss Richard Moran’s account of avowals, which grounds first-person authority in deliberative, self-directed agency. Although this view is promising, we argue that it ultimately fails (...)
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  14. Dorothea Debus (2014). 'Mental Time Travel': Remembering the Past, Imagining the Future, and the Particularity of Events. Review of Philosophy and Psychology 5 (3):333-350.
    The present paper offers a philosophical discussion of phenomena which in the empirical literature have recently been subsumed under the concept of ‘mental time travel’. More precisely, the paper considers differences and similarities between two cases of ‘mental time travel’, recollective memories (‘R-memories’) of past events on the one hand, and sensory imaginations (‘S-imaginations’) of future events on the other. It develops and defends the claim that, because a subject who R-remembers a past event is experientially aware of a past (...)
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  15. A. E. Denham (1996). Metaphor and Judgements of Experience. European Review of Philosophy 3:225-253.
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  16. Stuart Derbyshire & Anand Raja (2011). On the Development of Painful Experience. Journal of Consciousness Studies 18 (9-10):9-10.
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  17. Richard Double (1996). Four Naturalist Accounts of Moral Responsibility. Behavior and Philosophy 24 (2):137 - 143.
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  18. John Drummond (2009). Feelings, Emotions, and Truly Perceiving the Valuable. Modern Schoolman 86 (3-4):363-379.
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  19. Thomas Dubay (1962). An Investigation Into the Thomistic Concept of Pleasure. New Scholasticism 36 (1):76-99.
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  20. Bill Faw (2009). Conflicting Intuitions May Be Based on Differing Abilities: Evidence From Mental Imaging Research. Journal of Consciousness Studies 16 (4):45-68.
    Much of the current imaging literature either denies the existence of wakeful non-mental imagers, views non-imagers motivationally as 'repressors' or 'neurotic', or acknowledges them but does not fully incorporate them into their models. Neurobiologists testing for imaging loss seem to assume that visual recognition, describing objects, and free-hand drawing require the forming of conscious images. The intuition that 'the psyche never thinks without an image.... the reasoning mind thinks its ideas in the form of images' (Aristotle) has a long tradition (...)
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  21. Lucia Foglia & Rick Grush (2011). The Limitations of a Purely Enactive (Non-Representational) Account of Imagery. Journal of Consciousness Studies 18 (5-6):35 - 43.
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  22. Harry Frankfurt (1982). The Importance of What We Care About. Synthese 53 (2):257-272.
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  23. W. J. Freeman & R. Núñez (1999). Restoring Action, Intention and Emotion to Cognition. Journal of Consciousness Studies 6 (11/12).
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  24. Walter J. Freeman (1997). Happiness Doesnt Come in Bottles. Neuroscientists Learn That Joy Comes Through Dancing, Not Drugs. Journal of Consciousness Studies 4 (1):67-70.
    Too little has been written about the biology of joy. Most of the articles in the medical literature about brains and emotions are devoted to explaining how we feel fear, anger, anxiety and despair. This is understandable, because we don't go to doctors when we are feeling optimistic, happy and joyful. Most of what we know about the chemistry of our emotions has been learned from the disorders and the treatments of people who are sad and depressed. -/- But we (...)
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  25. Walter J. Freeman & Rafael Núñez (1999). Restoring to Cognition the Forgotten Primacy of Action, Intention and Emotion. Journal of Consciousness Studies 6 (11-12):11-12.
  26. Philip Gerrans & Klaus Scherer (2013). Wired for Despair The Neurochemistry of Emotion and the Phenomenology of Depression. Journal of Consciousness Studies 20 (7-8):7-8.
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  27. Valerie Gray Hardcastle (1999). It's Ok to Be Complicated: The Case of Emotion. Journal of Consciousness Studies 6 (11-12):237-249.
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  28. Rik Hine (2010). Attention as Experience: Through Thick Thin. Journal of Consciousness Studies 17 (9-10):9-10.
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  29. Max Hocutt (1995). Truth, Knowledge, and Belief: A Reply to Markham. Behavior and Philosophy 23 (2):79 - 80.
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  30. Jana M. Iverson & Esther Thelen (1999). The Primacy of Action, Intention and Emotion. Journal of Consciousness Studies 6 (11-12):19-40.
  31. Albert A. Johnstone (2013). Why Emotion? Journal of Consciousness Studies 20 (9-10):15-38.
    The various roles proposed for emotion, whether psychological such as preparing for action or serving prior concerns, or biological such as protecting and promoting well-being, are easily shown to have an awkward number of exceptions. This paper attempts to explain why. To this end it undertakes a Husserlian phenomenological examination of first-person experience of two types of responses, the various somatic responses elicited by sensations (pain, cold, pleasure, sudden intensity) and the various personal directed emotions (grief, fear, affection, joy). The (...)
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  32. Federico Langer (2012). Mental Imagery, Emotion, and Literary Task Sets Clues Towards a Literary Neuroart. Journal of Consciousness Studies 19 (7-8):168-215.
  33. Matthew Lockard (2013). Implication and Reasoning in Mental State Attribution: Comments on Jane Heal's Theory of Co-Cognition. Philosophical Psychology (5):1-16.
    Implication and reasoning in mental state attribution: Comments on Jane Heal's theory of co-cognition. . ???aop.label???. doi: 10.1080/09515089.2012.730040.
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  34. Bruce Mangan (2008). Representation, Rightness and the Fringe. Journal of Consciousness Studies 15 (9):75-82.
    So the central question here is phenomenological: What is the nature of the aesthetic zap? For it is this experience, or its promise, which gives art such a deep hold on human life. But the issue of representation, while secondary, is still pregnant with cognitive implications: Why is representation, of all the devices available to an artist, more likely to shift the odds in favour of eliciting and/or intensifying aesthetic experience? Assuming a Darwinian view of our species, it is likely (...)
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  35. Joseph Margolis (1975). Mental States. Behaviorism 3 (1):23-31.
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  36. Alfred R. Mele (1996). Addiction and Self-Control. Behavior and Philosophy 24 (2):99 - 117.
  37. Alfred R. Mele (1993). Motivated Belief. Behavior and Philosophy 21 (2):19 - 27.
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  38. Friederike Moltmann (2010). Relative Truth and the First Person. Philosophical Studies 150 (2):187-220..
    In recent work on context­dependency, it has been argued that certain types of sentences give rise to a notion of relative truth. In particular, sentences containing predicates of personal taste and moral or aesthetic evaluation as well as epistemic modals are held to express a proposition (relative to a context of use) which is true or false not only relative to a world of evaluation, but other parameters as well, such as standards of taste or knowledge or an agent. Thus, (...)
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  39. G. E. Moore (1899). The Nature of Judgment. Mind 8 (30):176-193.
  40. Christopher Peacocke (2012). Conceiving of Conscious States. In J. Ellis & D. Guevara (eds.), Wittgenstein and the Philosophy of Mind. Oup.
    For a wide range of concepts, a thinker’s understanding of what it is for a thing to fall under the concept plausibly involves knowledge of an identity. It involves knowledge that the thing has to have the same property as is exemplified in instantiation of the concept in some distinguished, basic instance. This paper addresses the question: can we apply this general model of the role of identity in understanding to the case of subjective, conscious states? In particular, can we (...)
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  41. Aaron Allen Schiller (2007). Psychological Nominalism and the Plausibility of Sellars's Myth of Jones. Southern Journal of Philosophy 45 (3):435-454.
    Part of Sellars’s general attack on the Myth of the Given is his endorsement of psychological nominalism, a view that implies that awareness of our own mental states is not given but must be earned. Sellars provides an account of how such awareness might have been earned with the Myth of Jones. Such an account is important for Sellars, for without it the Given can look necessary after all. But a problem with such accounts is that they can look extremely (...)
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  42. Dustin Stokes (2011). Minimally Creative Thought. Metaphilosophy 42 (5):658-681.
    Creativity has received, and continues to receive, comparatively little analysis in philosophy and the brain and behavioural sciences. This is in spite of the importance of creative thought and action, and the many and varied resources of theories of mind. Here an alternative approach to analyzing creativity is suggested: start from the bottom up with minimally creative thought. Minimally creative thought depends non-accidentally upon agency, is novel relative to the acting agent, and could not have been tokened before the time (...)
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  43. Sarah L. Strout, Rosemarie I. Sokol, James D. Laird & Nicholas S. Thompson (2004). The Evolutionary Foundation of Perceiving One's Own Emotions. Behavior and Philosophy 32 (2):493 - 502.
    Much research in the field of emotions has shown that people differ in the cues that they use to perceive their own emotions. People who are more responsive to personal cues (personal cuers) make use of cues arising from their own bodies and behavior; people who are less responsive to personal cues (situational cuers) make use of cues arising from the world around them. An evolutionary explanation of this well-documented phenomenon is that it occurs because of the operation of a (...)
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  44. Peter B. Todd, The Entangled State of God and Humanity. Asheville Jung Center Webinar Series, 22.
    As the title, The Entangled State of God and Humanity suggests, this webinar dispenses with the pre-Copernican, patriarchal, anthropomorphic image of God while presenting a case for a third millennium theology illuminated by insights from archetypal depth psychology, quantum physics, neuroscience and evolutionary biology. It attempts to smash the conceptual barriers between science and religion. The published work of C.G. Jung, Wolfgang Pauli, David Bohm and Teilhard de Chardin outline a process whereby matter evolves in increasing complexity from sub-atomic particles (...)
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  1. S. M. Cockle & A. T. Smith (1996). The Effects of Scopolamine on Covert Orientation of Attention. In Enrique Villanueva (ed.), Perception. Ridgeview. 140-140.
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Attention and Consciousness
  1. P. Sven Arvidson (2008). Attentional Capture and Attentional Character. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 7 (4):539-562.
    Attentional character is a way of thinking about what is relevant in a human life, what is meaningful and how it becomes so. This paper introduces the concept of attentional character through a redefinition of attentional capture as achievement. It looks freshly at the attentional capture debate in the current cognitive sciences literature through the lens of Aron Gurwitsch’s gestalt-phenomenology. Attentional character is defined as an initially limited capacity for attending in a given environment and is located within the sphere (...)
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  2. P. Sven Arvidson (2006). The Sphere of Attention: Context and Margin. Springer.
    For the first time, this book classifies how attention shifts, and argues that self-awareness, reflection, and even morality, are best thought of as dynamic...
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  3. P. Sven Arvidson (2004). Experimental Evidence for Three Dimensions of Attention. In Lester Embree (ed.), GurwitschS Relevancy for Cognitive Science. Springer. 151--168.
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  4. P. Sven Arvidson (2003). A Lexicon of Attention: From Cognitive Science to Phenomenology. [REVIEW] Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 2 (2):99-132.
    This article tries to create a bridge of understanding between cognitive scientists and phenomenologists who work on attention. In light of a phenomenology of attention and current psychological and neuropsychological literature on attention, I translate and interpret into phenomenological terms 20 key cognitive science concepts as examined in the laboratory and used in leading journals. As a preface to the lexicon, I outline a phenomenology of attention, especially as a dynamic three-part structure, which I have freely amended from the work (...)
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  5. P. Sven Arvidson (1998). Bringing Context Into Focus: Parallels in the Psychology of Attention and the Philosophy of Science. Journal of Phenomenological Psychology 29 (1):50-91.
    In the experimental psychology of attention, the phenomenon of attentional context has been underappreciated, while focal attention has taken center stage. Similar problems of context are found in certain realist arguments in .the philosophy of science. Through the lens of Aron Gurwitsch's phenomenology of attention, this paper discusses and evaluates the ways in which context is or is not brought into focus in experimental psychology and the philosophy of science. It concludes that recent developments in both realms show promise. Also (...)
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