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  1. added 2016-05-06
    Andrea Borghini & Giorgio Lando (forthcoming). Mereological Monism and Humean Supervenience. Synthese:1-21.
    According to Lewis, mereology is the general and exhaustive theory of ontological composition, and every contingent feature of the world supervenes upon some fundamental properties instantiated by minimal entities. A profound analogy can be drawn between these two basic contentions of his metaphysics, namely that both can be intended as a denial of emergentism. In this essay, we study the relationships between Humean supervenience and two philosophical spin-offs of mereological monism: the possibility of gunk and the thesis of composition as (...)
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  2. added 2016-05-06
    Daniel Capper (2016). Groundhog Oracles and Their Forebears. Zygon 51 (2):257-276.
    Groundhog Day animal weather forecasting ceremonies continue to proliferate around the United States despite a lack of public confidence in the oracles. This essay probes religio-historical and original ethnographic perspectives to offer a psychological argument for why these ceremonies exist. Employing Paul Shepard's notion of a felt loss of sacred, intimate relationships with nonhuman nature, as well as Peter Homans's concept of the monument that enables mourning, this essay argues that groundhog oracles serve as monuments that allow humans experientially to (...)
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  3. added 2016-05-06
    Alan C. Weissenbacher (2016). The Neuroscience of Wesleyan Soteriology: The Dynamic of Both Instantaneous and Gradual Change. Zygon 51 (2):347-360.
    In his work Rewired: Exploring Religious Conversion, dealing with Wesleyan soteriology and neuroscience, Paul Markham claims that when one incorporates biology as an epistemic restriction in theologies of conversion, doctrines of instantaneous conversion are invalidated. He asserts that conversion must always be gradual, because the mechanism by which the brain changes in response to experience does not occur instantaneously; rather change is initiated and consolidated over an often lengthy span of time. I argue, however, that doctrines of instantaneous conversion are (...)
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  4. added 2016-05-06
    Christoffer H. Grundmann (2016). Christ and the Cosmos—A Reformulation of Trinitarian Doctrine. By Keith Ward. New York, NY: Cambridge University Press, 2015. Xvii + 271 Pages. US $29.99. [REVIEW] Zygon 51 (2):540-542.
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  5. added 2016-05-06
    Robert J. Ryan (2016). Interpreting Vatican II: The Importance of Deed in Dei Verbum. Heythrop Journal 57 (3):n/a-n/a.
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  6. added 2016-05-06
    Peter N. Jordan (2016). Minimalist Engagement: Rowan Williams on Christianity and Science. Zygon 51 (2):387-404.
    During his time as Archbishop of Canterbury, Rowan Williams addressed the relations between Christianity and science at some length. While many contemporary theologians have explored the natural sciences in detail and have deployed scientific ideas and concepts in their theological work, Williams's writings suggest that theology has little need for natural scientific knowledge. For Williams, the created order's relationship to God renders the content of scientific theories about how finite causes are materially constituted and interact of little theological importance. At (...)
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  7. added 2016-05-06
    Christopher Southgate (2016). Science and Religion in the United Kingdom: A Personal View on the Contemporary Scene. Zygon 51 (2):361-386.
    This article considers the current state of the science–religion debate in the United Kingdom. It discusses the societies, groups, and individual scholars that shape that debate, including the dialogue between theology and physics, biology, and psychology. Attention is also given to theology's engagement with ecological issues. The article also reflects on the loss of influence of denominational Christianity within British society, and the impact both on the character of the debate and the role of the churches. Finally, some promising trajectories (...)
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  8. added 2016-05-06
    Fraser MacBride (2016). Relations. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  9. added 2016-05-06
    Michael J. Crowe (2016). William Whewell, the Plurality of Worlds, and the Modern Solar System. Zygon 51 (2):431-449.
    Astronomers of the first half of the nineteenth century viewed our solar system entirely differently from the way twentieth-century astronomers viewed it. In the earlier period the dominant image was of a set of planets and moons, both of which kinds of bodies were inhabited by intelligent beings comparable to humans. By the early twentieth century, science had driven these beings from every planet in our system except the Earth, leaving our solar system as more or less desolate regions for (...)
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  10. added 2016-05-06
    Willem B. Drees (2016). Far Away and at Home: Multiple Interactions of Religion and Science. Zygon 51 (2):233-238.
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  11. added 2016-05-06
    David Dunér (2016). Swedenborg and the Plurality of Worlds: Astrotheology in the Eighteenth Century. Zygon 51 (2):450-479.
    The possible existence of extraterrestrial life led in the eighteenth century to a heated debate on the unique status of the human being and of Christianity. One of those who discussed the new scientific worldview and its implications for theology was the Swedish natural philosopher and theologian Emanuel Swedenborg. This article discusses Swedenborg's astrotheological transformation, his use of theological arguments in his early cosmology, and his cosmogony that later on ended up in his use of contemporary natural philosophy in his (...)
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  12. added 2016-05-06
    Daniele Bertini (2016). Tradizioni religiose e diversità. Edizioni Fondazione Centro Studi Campostrini.
    Most literature on religious beliefs and disagreements among traditions focuses on a bit of mainstream assumptions: religions should be construed in substantive terms; religions are to be individuated by their core belief systems; adherents to a single tradition assent to the same belief system; religious beliefs have factual content; incompatible religious beliefs cannot be both true; and so on. In my work I question all these claims in order to defend a non kantian approach to deep pluralism. In the first (...)
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  13. added 2016-05-06
    Andreas Losch (2016). Astrotheology: On Exoplanets, Christian Concerns, and Human Hopes. Zygon 51 (2):405-413.
    Are there planets beyond our solar system? What may appear quite plausible now had only been a hypothesis until about twenty years ago. The search for exoplanets is driven by the interest in the “habitable” ones among them. Could such planets one day in the far future provide resources or even shelter for humankind? Will we find one day a habitable planet that is even inhabited? These kinds of imaginative speculations drive public interest in the subject. Imagining alien intelligent life (...)
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  14. added 2016-05-06
    César Marín & Guillermo DʾElía (2016). Effect of Academic Degree and Discipline on Religious Beliefs and Evolution Acceptance: Survey at a Chilean University. Zygon 51 (2):277-292.
    Affiliation with a scientific area or degree program could affect one´s religious beliefs and acceptance of evolution; however, this issue has been poorly studied. Moreover, little information is available regarding Chilean university scientists’ views on religion and evolution. This study aims to provide the first documentation of the opinion of scientists at a Chilean University with regard to religion and evolution. This was done by conducting a personal survey of first and last year undergraduate students, graduate students, and faculty. We (...)
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  15. added 2016-05-06
    Michael Rhodes (2016). ‘Apart From Works’: An Exegetical and Theological Reflection on Romans 3.21–4.25 and the New Perspective on Paul. Heythrop Journal 57 (3).
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  16. added 2016-05-06
    Christoffer H. Grundmann (2016). Re‐Vision: A New Look at the Relationship Between Science and Religion. By Clifford Chalmers Cain. Lanham, MD: University Press of America, 2015. Xii + 164 Pages. US $29.99. [REVIEW] Zygon 51 (2):536-537.
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  17. added 2016-05-06
    Ted Peters (2016). Astrobiology and Astrochristology. Zygon 51 (2):480-496.
    Astrochristology, as a subfield within the more comprehensive astrotheology, speculates on the implications of what astrobiology and related space sciences learn about our future space neighbors. Confirmation of the existence of extraterrestrial intelligent civilizations living on exoplanets will force Christian theologians to decide on two issues. The first issue deals with the question: should Christians expect many incarnations, one for each inhabited exoplanet; or will the single incarnation in terrestrial history suffice? The second issue deals with the question: why is (...)
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  18. added 2016-05-06
    Anna Pokazanyeva (2016). Mind Within Matter: Science, the Occult, and the Physics of Ether and Akasha. Zygon 51 (2):318-346.
    The intersection between quantum theory, metaphysical spirituality, and Indian-inspired philosophy has an established place in speculative scientific and alternative religious communities alike. There is one term that has historically bridged these two worlds: “Akasha,” often translated as “ether.” Akasha appears both in metaphysical spiritual contexts, most often in ones influenced by Theosophy, and in the speculative scientific discourse that has historically demonstrated a strong affinity for the brand of monistic metaphysics that Indian-derived spiritualities tend to foster. This article traces the (...)
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  19. added 2016-05-06
    Tom Wang (2016). Designing Confucian Conscience Into Social Networks. Zygon 51 (2):239-256.
    Several scholars have argued that Internet use might be fundamentally incompatible with Confucian ethics, because the values that are embedded in the Internet might be in conflict with Confucian values. In addition, the design of various social network services considers very little of non-Western values in its engineering. Against this background, this article explores the philosophical question of whether Internet use, particularly social network services, is compatible with the fundamental values and norms of Confucian ethics. In addition, the article discusses (...)
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  20. added 2016-05-06
    Willem B. Drees (2016). The Atom of the Universe: The Life and Work of Georges Lemaître. By Dominque Lambert. Kraków, Poland: Copernicus Center Press, 2015. 464 Pages. Photographs. Hardcover or eBook, €49.90. [REVIEW] Zygon 51 (2):538-540.
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  21. added 2016-05-06
    Howard Smith (2016). Alone in the Universe. Zygon 51 (2):497-519.
    We are probably alone in the universe—a conclusion based on observations of over 4,000 exoplanets and fundamental physical constraints. This article updates earlier arguments with the latest astrophysical results. Since the discovery of exoplanets, theologians have asked with renewed urgency what the presence of extraterrestrial intelligence says about salvation and human purpose, but this is the wrong question. The more urgent question is what their absence says. The “Misanthropic Principle” is the observation that, in a universe fine-tuned for life, the (...)
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  22. added 2016-05-06
    Luca Forgione (2016). Kant and Natural Kind Terms. Theoria. An International Journal for Theory, History and Foundations of Science 31 (1):55-72.
    As is well known, the linguistic/philosophical reflection on natural <span class='Hi'>kind</span> <span class='Hi'>terms</span> has undergone a remarkable development in the early seventies with Putnam and Kripke’s essentialist approaches (cf. §3), touching upon different aspects (metaphysical and epistemological in particular) of <span class='Hi'>Kant</span>’s slant. Preliminarily, however, it might be useful to review some of the theoretical stages in Locke and Leibniz’s approaches on natural <span class='Hi'>kind</span> <span class='Hi'>terms</span> in the light of contemporary reflections (cf. § 2), to eventually pinpoint <span class='Hi'>Kant</span>’s (...)
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  23. added 2016-05-06
    André Azevedo Alves, Philip Booth & Barbara Fryzel (2016). Business Culture and Corporate Social Responsibility: An Analysis in the Light of Catholic Social Teaching with an Application to Whistle‐Blowing. Heythrop Journal 57 (3):n/a-n/a.
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  24. added 2016-05-06
    David Wilkinson (2016). Searching for Another Earth: The Recent History of the Discovery of Exoplanets. Zygon 51 (2):414-430.
    The discovery of exoplanets is a small part of the array of scientific arguments for and against the existence of extraterrestrial intelligence. Yet the recent stunning achievement of this program of observational astronomy has had a significant effect on scientific opinion and public interest. It also raises some key theological questions. New observing techniques are leading to the discovery of extrasolar planets daily. Earth-like planets outside of our Solar System can now be identified and in future years explored for signs (...)
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  25. added 2016-05-06
    Leonard M. Hummel & Gayle E. Woloschak (2016). Chance, Necessity, Love: An Evolutionary Theology of Cancer. Zygon 51 (2):293-317.
    In his 1970s work Chance and Necessity, Jacques Monod provided an explanatory framework not only for the biological evolution of species, but, as has become recently apparent, for the evolutionary development of cancers. That is, contemporary oncological research has demonstrated that cancer is an evolutionary disease that develops according to the same dynamics of chance and necessity at work in all evolutionary phenomena. And just as various challenges are raised for religious thought by the operations of chance and necessity within (...)
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  26. added 2016-05-06
    Lucas John Mix (2016). Life‐Value Narratives and the Impact of Astrobiology on Christian Ethics. Zygon 51 (2):520-535.
    “Pale Blue Dot” and “Anthropocene” are common tropes in astrobiology and often appear in ethical arguments. Both support a decentering of human life relative to biological life in terms of value. This article introduces a typology of life-value narratives: hierarchical narratives with human life above other life and holistic narratives with human life among other life. Astrobiology, through the two tropes, supports holistic narratives, but this should not be viewed as opposed to Christianity. Rather, Christian scriptures provide seeds of both (...)
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  27. added 2016-05-06
    Georgi Gardiner (2015). Teleologies and the Methodology of Epistemology. In David Henderson & John Greco (eds.), Epistemic Evaluation: Purposeful Epistemology. Oxford University Press 31-45.
    The teleological approach to an epistemic concept investigates it by asking questions such as ‘what is the purpose of the concept?’, ‘What role has it played in the past?’, or ‘If we imagine a society without the concept, why would they feel the need to invent it?’ The idea behind the teleological approach is that examining the function of the concept illuminates the contours of the concept itself. This approach is a relatively new development in epistemology, and as yet there (...)
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  28. added 2016-05-05
    John Pittard (forthcoming). Evil and God's Toxin Puzzle. Noûs.
    I show that Kavka’s toxin puzzle raises a problem for the “Responsibility Theodicy,” which holds that the reason God typically does not intervene to stop the evil effects of our actions is that such intervention would undermine the possibility of our being significantly responsible for overcoming and averting evil. This prominent theodicy seems to require that God be able to do what the agent in Kavka’s toxin story cannot do: stick by a plan to do some action at a future (...)
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  29. added 2016-05-05
    J. L. Dowell (forthcoming). Confusion of Tongues: A Theory of Normative Language. Mind:fzv148.
  30. added 2016-05-05
    Jonathan Rutledge (forthcoming). Skeptical Theism, Moral Skepticism, and Epistemic Propriety. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion:1-10.
    Respondents to the argument from evil who follow Michael Bergmann’s development of skeptical theism hold that our failure to determine God’s reasons for permitting evil does not disconfirm theism at all. They claim that such a thesis follows from the very plausible claim that we have no good reason to think our access to the realm of value is representative of the full realm of value. There are two interpretations of ST’s strength, the stronger of which leads skeptical theists into (...)
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  31. added 2016-05-05
    Alexander Sandgren (2016). Cruel Intensions: An Essay on Intentional Identity and Intentional Attitudes. Dissertation, The Australian National University
    Some intentional attitudes (beliefs, fears, desires, etc.) have a common focus in spite of there being no object at that focus. For example, two beliefs may be about the same witch even when there are no witches, different astronomers had beliefs directed at Vulcan, even though there is no such planet. This relation of having a common focus, whether or not there is an actual concrete object at that focus, is called intentional identity. In the first part of this thesis (...)
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  32. added 2016-05-05
    Katia Vavova (2016). Irrelevant Influences. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 92 (3):n/a-n/a.
    We often hear such casual accusations: you just believe that because you are a liberal, a Christian, an American, a woman… When such charges are made they are meant to sting—not just emotionally, but epistemically. But should they? It can be disturbing to learn that one's beliefs reflect the influence of such irrelevant factors. The pervasiveness of such influence has led some to worry that we are not justified in many of our beliefs. That same pervasiveness has led others to (...)
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  33. added 2016-05-05
    Filippo Casati & Naoya Fujikawa, Nonexistent Objects as Truth-Makers : Against Crane's Reductionism.
    According to Meinongianism, some objects do not exist but we can legitimately refer to and quantify over them. Moreover, Meinongianism standardly regards nonexistent objects as contributing to the truth-makers of sentences about nonexistent objects. Recently, Tim Crane has proposed a weak form of Meinongianism, a reductionism, which denies any contribution of nonexistent objects to truth-making. His reductionism claims that, even though we can truly talk about nonexistent objects by using singular terms and quantifiers about them, any truth about nonexistent objects (...)
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  34. added 2016-05-05
    Domingos Faria (2016). Uma avaliação do argumento ontológico modal de Plantinga. Kairos: Journal of Philosophy and Science 15 (1):71-84.
    My aim in this paper is to critically assess Plantinga’s modal ontological argument for existence of God, such as it is presented in the book “The Nature of Necessity” (1974). Plantinga tries to show that this argument is (i) valid and (ii) it is rational to believe in his main premise, namely “there is a possible world in which maximal greatness is instantiated”. On the one hand, I want to show that this argument is logically valid in both systems B (...)
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  35. added 2016-05-05
    Fraser MacBride (2015). "On The Origins of Order: Non-Symmetric or Only Symmetric Relations?". In M. J. Loux & G. Galuzzo (eds.), The Problem of Universals in Contemporary Philosophy. Cambridge University Press 173-94.
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  36. added 2016-05-04
    Myrto Mylopoulos & Elisabeth Pacherie (forthcoming). Intentions and Motor Representations: The Interface Challenge. Review of Philosophy and Psychology:1-20.
    A full account of purposive action must appeal not only to propositional attitude states like beliefs, desires, and intentions, but also to motor representations, i.e., non-propositional states that are thought to represent, among other things, action outcomes as well as detailed kinematic features of bodily movements. This raises the puzzle of how it is that these two distinct types of state successfully coordinate. We examine this so-called “Interface Problem”. First, we clarify and expand on the nature and role of motor (...)
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  37. added 2016-05-04
    Nick Young (forthcoming). Hearing Spaces. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-14.
    ABSTRACTIn this paper I argue that empty space can be heard. This position contrasts with the generally held view that the only things that can be heard are sounds, their properties, echoes, and perhaps sound sources. Specifically, I suggest that when sounds reverberate in enclosed environments we auditorily represent the volume of space surrounding us. Clearly, we can learn the approximate size of an enclosed space through hearing a sound reverberate within it, and so any account that denies that we (...)
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  38. added 2016-05-04
    C. Kelp (forthcoming). Assertion: A Function First Account. Noûs.
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  39. added 2016-05-04
    Fabrice Teroni (forthcoming). Emotions, Me, Myself and I. International Journal of Philosophical Studies.
    Abstract We are prone to think that the emotions someone undergoes are somehow revelatory of the sort of person she is, and philosophers working in the field have frequently insisted upon the existence of an intimate relation between a subject and her emotions. But how intimate is the relation between emotions and the self? I first explain why interesting claims about this relation must locate it at the level of emotional intentionality. Given that emotions have a complex intentional structure—they are (...)
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  40. added 2016-05-04
    C. Kelp & M. Simion (forthcoming). Criticism and Blame in Action and Assertion. Journal of Philosophy.
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  41. added 2016-05-04
    C. Kelp & H. Ghijsen (2016). Perceptual Justification: Factive Reasons and Fallible Virtues. In C. Mi, M. Slote & E. Sosa (eds.), Moral and Intellectual Virtues in Western and Chinese Philosophy. Routledge
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  42. added 2016-05-04
    Brian Kim (2016). In Defense of Subject-Sensitive Invariantism. Episteme 13 (2):233-251.
    Keith DeRose has argued that the two main problems facing subject-sensitive invariantism come from the appropriateness of certain third-person denials of knowledge and the inappropriateness of now you know it, now you don't claims. I argue that proponents of SSI can adequately address both problems. First, I argue that the debate between contextualism and SSI has failed to account for an important pragmatic feature of third-person denials of knowledge. Appealing to these pragmatic features, I show that straightforward third-person denials are (...)
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  43. added 2016-05-04
    Johan E. Gustafsson (2016). Consequentialism with Wrongness Depending on the Difficulty of Doing Better. Thought: A Journal of Philosophy 5 (1).
    Moral wrongness comes in degrees. On a consequentialist view of ethics, the wrongness of an act should depend, I argue, in part on how much worse the act's consequences are compared with those of its alternatives and in part on how difficult it is to perform the alternatives with better consequences. I extend act consequentialism to take this into account, and I defend three conditions on consequentialist theories. The first is consequentialist dominance, which says that, if an act has better (...)
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  44. added 2016-05-04
    C. Kelp (2016). Epistemic Frankfurt Cases Revisited. American Philosophical Quarterly 53:27-37.
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  45. added 2016-05-04
    Charlie Crerar (2016). Taboo, Hermeneutical Injustice, and Expressively Free Environments. Episteme 13 (2):195-207.
    In Epistemic Injustice, Miranda Fricker has insightfully introduced the notion of a hermeneutical injustice, where historic conditions of marginalisation serve to deprive individuals of the appropriate hermeneutical resources with which to render significant patches of their experience fully intelligible to themselves and others. In this paper I draw attention to a shortcoming in Fricker's account: that the only hermeneutical resource she acknowledges is a shared conceptual framework. Consequently, Fricker creates the impression that hermeneutical injustice manifests itself almost exclusively in the (...)
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  46. added 2016-05-04
    C. Kelp (2016). Towards a Knowledge-Based Account of Understanding. In S. Grimm, C. Baumberger & S. Ammon (eds.), Explaining Understanding. Routledge
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  47. added 2016-05-04
    Srećko Kovač & Kordula Świętorzecka (2015). Gödel's "Slingshot" Argument and His Onto-Theological System. In Kordula Świętorzecka (ed.), Gödel's Ontological Argument: History, Modifications, and Controversies. Semper 123-162.
  48. added 2016-05-04
    Srećko Kovač (2015). Causal Interpretation of Gödel's Ontological Proof. In Kordula Świętorzecka (ed.), Gödel's Ontological Argument: History, Modifications, and Controversies. Semper 163.201.
  49. added 2016-05-04
    C. Kelp (2014). Knowledge, Understanding and Virtue. In A. Fairweather (ed.), Virtue Scientia. Virtue Epistemology and Philosophy of Science. Springer
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  50. added 2016-05-04
    C. Kelp (2014). Two for the Knowledge Goal of Inquiry. American Philosophical Quarterly 51:227-32.
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