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  1. Mitchell Aboulafia (1982). The Self-Winding Circle: A Study of Hegel's System. W.H. Green.
  2. Vinod Acharya (2013). Nietzsche's Meta-Existentialism. Walter de Gruyter.
    Vinod Acharya presents a new existential interpretation of Nietzsche's philosophy. He contends that Nietzsche’s peculiar form of existentialism can be understood only by undertaking a thorough analysis of his characterization and critique of metaphysics. This reading remedies the shortcomings of previous existential interpretations of Nietzsche, which typically view existentialism as concerned primarily with the meaning of individual existence, and therefore necessarily at odds with the abstraction and objectivity of metaphysical thought. Acharya argues that the approach of Nietzsche’s philosophy, especially in (...)
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  3. Henry C. Alphin Jr, Singular Immortality: Desirableness Through Technology and Liberty.
    In this essay, I argue that an immortal existence could be desirable. Taking the accounts of Williams and Smuts under careful consideration, I agree with Fischer that an immortal existence could be gratifying. When Fischer argues that it is unfair for Williams to posit that an immortal life must have self-exhausting pleasures and, overall, a better experience than mortal life, he gets to the crux of the argument for immortality: as long as there are positive categorical desires for the individual, (...)
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  4. John Altmann, A Critique of Colin McGinn's Human Cognition Theory.
    This is a brief essay discussing Colin McGinn's theory of human cognition. Mcginn believes that the more profound Metaphysical problems such as the mind-body problem, are unsolvable due to the limitations of our cognitive abilities. I argue that the solutions to these problems lies not in the strength of our cognitive abilities but rather in how we apply these abilities.
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  5. Maria Rosa Antognazza (forthcoming). Leibniz’s Theory of Substance and His Metaphysics of the Incarnation. In Paul Lodge & T. W. C. Stoneham (eds.), Locke and Leibniz on Substance and Identity. Routledge.
    This paper explores the development of Leibniz’s metaphysics of the Incarnation in the context of his philosophy. In particular it asks to what extent Leibniz’s repeated endorsement of the traditional analogy between the union in humankind of soul (mind) and body, and the union in Christ of divine and human natures, could be accommodated by his more general metaphysical doctrines. Such an investigation highlights some of the deepest commitments in Leibniz’s theory of substance as well as detect in it some (...)
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  6. Lauren Ashwell (2010). Superficial Dispositionalism. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 88 (4):635-653.
    Dispositional ascriptions do not entail the counterfactuals we might expect, as interfering factors may be poised to prevent the disposition from manifesting in its very stimulus conditions. Such factors are commonly called finks and masks. It is thought, however, that finks and masks cannot be intrinsic to the disposition bearer; if an intrinsic property of the object would prevent a particular response in certain conditions, the object fails to have the corresponding disposition. I argue that we should accept intrinsic finks (...)
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  7. Gábor Bács & János Tőzsér (2012). The Works of Art From the Philosophically Innocent Point of View. Hungarian Philosophical Review 57 (4):7-17.
    the Mona Lisa, the Mondscheinsonate, the Chanson d’automne are works of art, the salt shaker on your table, the car in your garage, or the pijamas on your bed are not. the basic question of the metaphysics of works of art is this: what makes a thing a work of art? that is: what sort of property do works of art have in virtue of which they are works of art? or more simply: what sort of property being a work (...)
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  8. Dirk Baltzly (1999). Aristotle and Platonic Dialectic in Metaphysics Gamma. Apeiron 32 (4):171-202.
    I come not to clarify Aristotle’s defence of the principle of non-contradiction, but to put it in its proper context. I argue that remarks in Metaphysics IV.3 together with the argument of IV.4, 1006a11-31 show that Aristotle practises Plato’s method of dialectic in his defence of PNC. I mean this in the strong sense that he uses the very methodology described in the middle books of the Republic and, I claim, illustrated in such dialogues as Parmenides, Sophist and Theaetetus.
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  9. Marina Paola Banchetti-Robino (2006). The Microcosm/Macrocosm Analogy in Ibn Sina and Husserl. In Anna-Teresa Tymieniecka (ed.), Islamic Philosophy and Occidental Phenomenology on the Perennial Issue of Microcosm and Macrocosm. Springer.
  10. Elizabeth Barnes & J. R. G. Williams (2009). Vague Parts and Vague Identity. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 90 (2):176-187.
    We discuss arguments against the thesis that the world itself can be vague. The first section of the paper distinguishes dialectically effective from ineffective arguments against metaphysical vagueness. The second section constructs an argument against metaphysical vagueness that promises to be of the dialectically effective sort: an argument against objects with vague parts. Firstly, cases of vague parthood commit one to cases of vague identity. But we argue that Evans' famous argument against will not on its own enable one to (...)
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  11. Arvid Båve (2006). Deflationism: A Use-Theoretic Analysis of the Truth-Predicate. Dissertation, Stockholm University
    I here develop a specific version of the deflationary theory of truth. I adopt a terminology on which deflationism holds that an exhaustive account of truth is given by the equivalence between truth-ascriptions and de-nominalised (or disquoted) sentences. An adequate truth-theory, it is argued, must be finite, non-circular, and give a unified account of all occurrences of “true”. I also argue that it must descriptively capture the ordinary meaning of “true”, which is plausibly taken to be unambiguous. Ch. 2 is (...)
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  12. Umut Baysan (2015). Realization Relations in Metaphysics. Minds and Machines:1-14.
    “Realization” is a technical term that is used by metaphysicians, philosophers of mind, and philosophers of science to denote some dependence relation that is thought to obtain between higher-level properties and lower-level properties. It is said that mental properties are realized by physical properties; functional and computational properties are realized by first-order properties that occupy certain causal/functional roles; dispositional properties are realized by categorical properties; so on and so forth. Given this wide usage of the term “realization”, it would be (...)
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  13. Jiri Benovsky (2013). From Experience to Metaphysics: On Experience‐Based Intuitions and Their Role in Metaphysics. Noûs 47 (3):n/a-n/a.
    Metaphysical theories are often counter-intuitive. But they also often are strongly supported and motivated by intuitions. One way or another, the link between intuitions and metaphysics is a strong and important one, and there is hardly any metaphysical discussion where intuitions do not play a crucial role. In this article, I will be interested in a particular kind of such intuitions, namely those that come, at least partly, from experience. There seems to be a route from experience to metaphysics, and (...)
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  14. Francesco Berto (2008). Modal Meinongianism for Fictional Objects. Metaphysica 9 (2):205-218.
    Drawing on different suggestions from the literature, we outline a unified metaphysical framework, labeled as Modal Meinongian Metaphysics (MMM), combining Meinongian themes with a non-standard modal ontology. The MMM approach is based on (1) a comprehension principle (CP) for objects in unrestricted, but qualified form, and (2) the employment of an ontology of impossible worlds, besides possible ones. In §§1–2, we introduce the classical Meinongian metaphysics and consider two famous Russellian criticisms, namely (a) the charge of inconsistency and (b) the (...)
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  15. Francesco Berto (2006). Meaning, Metaphysics, and Contradiction. American Philosophical Quarterly 43 (4):283-297.
  16. John D. Bishop (2003). Prospects for a Naturalist Libertarianism: O'Connor's Persons and Causes. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 66 (1):228-243.
  17. Einar Duenger Bohn (2012). Anselmian Theism and Indefinitely Extensible Perfection. Philosophical Quarterly 62 (249):671-683.
    The Anselmian Thesis is the thesis that God is that than which nothing greater can be thought. In this paper, I argue that such a notion of God is incoherent due to greatness being indefinitely extensible: roughly, for any great being that can be, there is another one that is greater, so there cannot be a being than which nothing greater can be. Someone will say that it is impossible to produce the best, because there is no perfect creature, and (...)
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  18. Einar Duenger Bohn (2011). Commentary on "Parts of Classes". Humana.Mente Journal of Philosophical Studies 19.
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  19. Borchert (ed.) (2006). Philosophy of Science. MacMillan.
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  20. Andrea Borghini (2014). I confini di un taglio. In Elena Casetta & Valeria Giardino (eds.), Mettere a fuoco il mondo. ISONOMIA - Epistemologica Series Editor, University of Urbino. 14-22.
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  21. Francesca Brencio (2002). L’essere ed il destino della metafisica occidentale nella riflessione di Martin Heidegger. Oros 1 (1).
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  22. Berit Brogaard (2004). Species as Individuals. Biology and Philosophy 19 (2):223-242.
    There is no question that the constituents of cells and organisms are joined together by the part-whole relation. Genes are part of cells, and cells are part of organisms. Species taxa, however, have traditionally been conceived of, not as wholes with parts, but as classes with members. But why does the relation change abruptly from part-whole to class-membership above the level of organisms? Ghiselin, Hull and others have argued that it doesn't. Cells and organisms are cohesive mereological sums, and since (...)
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  23. Jeffrey E. Brower (2011). Matter, Form, and Individuation. In Brian Davies & Eleonore Stump (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Aquinas. Oxford University Press.
    Few notions are more central to Aquinas’s thought than those of matter and form. Although he invokes these notions in a number of different contexts, and puts them to a number of different uses, he always assumes that in their primary or basic sense they are correlative both with each other and with the notion of a “hylomorphic compound”—that is, a compound of matter (hyle) and form (morphe). Thus, matter is an entity that can have form, form is an entity (...)
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  24. Krzysztof Brzechczyn (2009). Leszek Nowak (1943-2009). Polish Journal of Philosophy 3 (2):7-8.
    This paper is obituary of Leszek Nowak, one of the greatest Polish philosophers of the XX century.
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  25. Andrei A. Buckareff & Joel S. Van Wagenen (2010). Surviving Resurrection. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 67 (3):123-139.
    In this paper we examine and critique the constitution view of the metaphysics of resurrection developed and defended by Lynne Rudder Baker. Baker identifies three conditions for an adequate metaphysics of resurrection. We argue that one of these, the identity condition, cannot be met on the constitution view given the account of personal identity it assumes. We discuss some problems with the constitution theory of personal identity Baker develops in her book, Persons and Bodies . We argue that these problems (...)
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  26. Claudio Calosi & Achille C. Varzi (2014). Back to Black. Ratio 27 (4).
    This is a brief sequel to Max Black's classic dialogue on the Identity of Indiscernibles. Interlocutor A defends the bundle theory by endorsing the (by now popular) view according to which Black's world does not contain two indiscernible spheres but rather a single, bi-located sphere. His opponent, B, objects that A cannot distinguish such a world from a world with a single, uniquely located sphere, hence that the view in question adds nothing to A's original response to Black's challenge. A (...)
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  27. Muñoz-Suárez Carlos, CONCRETE ENTITIES AND NON-CONCRETE ENTITIES IN COGNITION.
    Seems plausible to accept the thesis that “it is not objects per se that have a special status in the mind of the child”. I grasp this thesis in the sense that the only stuff that infants can individuate are not objects, but this not implies that objects do not make the core contribution to our (adult) metaphysical conceptual scheme, i.e. to constitute a platform for basic adaptive environmental performances in adult life. Plausibly, any young human cognitive system needs to (...)
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  28. Elena Casetta (2014). Metafisica mostruosa. In Elena Casetta & Valeria Giardino (eds.), Mettere a fuoco il mondo. © ISONOMIA – Epistemologica, University of Urbino. 24-35.
    Se leggiamo tra le righe del suo lavoro, possiamo scoprire che Varzi prende i mostri molto sul serio. Troviamo, per esempio, mostri mereologici frutto della composizione non ristretta, come l’entità costituita dalla metà sinistra di questa mela e dal bracciolo di quella poltrona.10 Oppure mostri topologici dai quali una teoria mereotopologica delle nicche deve rifuggire, come le curve riempispazio di Peano e Hilbert.11 O, ancora, mostri ontologici come l’antimateria;12 le entità “inesistenti” che, come si sa, non possono esistere, dato che (...)
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  29. D. Chalmers, D. Manley & R. Wasserman (eds.) (2009). Metametaphysics: New Essays on the Foundations of Ontology. Oxford University Press.
  30. Hugh S. Chandler (1971). A Note in Defense of Personal Materialism. Philosophical Studies 22 (4):61 - 64.
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  31. Tony Cheng (2011). Review of Attention is Cognitive Unison. [REVIEW] Metapsychology 15 (29).
    Attention is Cognitive Unison is probably the only book exclusively on attention in the philosophy literature in the past few decades. Before this, of course we have some nice books on relevant themes, for example John Campbell's Reference and Consciousness (2002). However, although Campbell invokes the notion of attention to do some explanatory works, his exposition of the very idea of attention is not as thoroughgoing as Mole's book. As Mole's summary of relevant history shows, in philosophy there was Alan (...)
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  32. William Child (1994). On the Dualism of Scheme and Content. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 94:53-71.
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  33. Stephen R. L. Clark (1991). God's World and the Great Awakening. Oxford University Press.
    In this book, Stephen R.L. Clark defends the primary faith of humankind, that there is a real world which is more than a shadow of our desires and fancies, and which can be discovered through right reason. Focusing on the way in which we can "turn aside" to the Truth from the normal delusions of self-concern, Clark offers a properly worked, Platonic metaphysics as the key to identifying that reality. This book is the final volume of Limits and Renewals, a (...)
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  34. S. Marc Cohen (1984). Aristotle and Individuation. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 1984 (s.v.):41-65.
    It is traditionally maintained that according to Aristotle, matter provides a principle of individuation. Objections of several sorts have been raised against this interpretation. One objection holds that for Aristotle it is form, rather than matter, that individuates. A more radical objection is that Aristotle does not propose any principle of individuation at all. Any adequate discussion of this issue must make clear precisely what problems such a principle is meant to address. This in turn requires that several important distinctions (...)
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  35. S. Marc Cohen (1971). The Logic of the Third Man. Philosophical Review 80 (4):448-475.
    The main lines of interpretation offered to date of the Third Man Argument in Plato's Parmenides (132a1-b2) are considered and rejected. A new, set-theoretic, reconstruction of the argument is offered. It is concluded that the philosophical point of the argument is different from what it has been generally supposed to be: Plato is pointing out the logical shortcomings in his earlier formulated principle of One-Over-Many.
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  36. Christina Conroy (2008). No Lacuna and No Vicious Regress: A Reply to le Poidevin. [REVIEW] Acta Analytica 23 (4):367-372.
    In his “Space, supervenience and substantivalism”, Le Poidevin proposes a substantivalism in which space is discrete, implying that there are unmediated spatial relations between neighboring primitive points. This proposition is motivated by his concern that relationism suffers from an explanatory lacuna and that substantivalism gives rise to a vicious regress. Le Poidevin implicitly requires that the relationist be committed to the “only x and y ” principle regarding spatial relations. It is not obvious that the relationist is committed to this (...)
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  37. Jason Costanzo, Reflection and Existence.
    Following Kant, subjectivity is seen as an obstacle to any access into things themselves. For this reason, Kant concludes that metaphysics as the science of being as being is necessarily impossible. In this essay, the possibilities of metaphysics in light of the problem of subjectivity are reexamined. The nature of subjectivity and the subject’s encounter with being are analyzed yielding two fundamental relational structures that hold with respect to being and the subject. Further examination of the act of reflection coupled (...)
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  38. Chris Daly & Simon Langford (2011). Two Anti-Platonist Strategies. Mind 119 (476):1107-1116.
    This paper considers two strategies for undermining indispensability arguments for mathematical Platonism. We defend one strategy (the Trivial Strategy) against a criticism by Joseph Melia. In particular, we argue that the key example Melia uses against the Trivial Strategy fails. We then criticize Melia’s chosen strategy (the Weaseling Strategy.) The Weaseling Strategy attempts to show that it is not always inconsistent or irrational knowingly to assert p and deny an implication of p . We argue that Melia’s case for this (...)
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  39. George Darby (2010). Quantum Mechanics and Metaphysical Indeterminacy. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 88 (2):227-245.
    There has been recent interest in formulating theories of non-representational indeterminacy. The aim of this paper is to clarify the relevance of quantum mechanics to this project. Quantum-mechanical examples of vague objects have been offered by various authors, displaying indeterminate identity, in the face of the famous Evans argument that such an idea is incoherent. It has also been suggested that the quantum-mechanical treatment of state-dependent properties exhibits metaphysical indeterminacy. In both cases it is important to consider the details of (...)
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  40. Brian Davies & Eleonore Stump (eds.) (2011). The Oxford Handbook of Aquinas. Oxford University Press.
    This Handbook is therefore meant to be useful to someone wanting to learn about Aquinas's philosophy and theology while also looking for help in philosophical ...
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  41. Daniel D. De Haan (2014). A Mereological Construal of the Primary Notions Being and Thing in Avicenna and Aquinas. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 88 (2):335-360.
    This study has two goals: first, to show that Avicenna’s account of being and thing significantly influenced Aquinas’s doctrine of the primary notions; second, to establish the value of adopting a mereological construal of these primary notions in the metaphysics of Avicenna and Aquinas. I begin with an explication of the mereological construal of the primary notions that casts these notions in terms of wholes and parts. Being and thing refer to the same entitative whole and have the same extension, (...)
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  42. Mauro Dorato (2015). Presentism and the Experience of Time. Topoi 34 (1):265-275.
    Presentists have typically argued that the Block View is incapable of explaining our experience of time. In this paper I argue that the phenomenology of our experience of time is, on the contrary, against presentism. My argument is based on a dilemma: presentists must either assume that the metaphysical present has no temporal extension, or that it is temporally extended. The former horn leads to phenomenological problems. The latter renders presentism metaphysically incoherent, unless one posits a discrete present that, however, (...)
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  43. Peter Eastman, Beyond the Ultimate: The Impossible Proposition at the Core of Meister Eckhart’s Unique Teaching, and Why He Remains so Consistently Misunderstood.
    Abstract: Eckhart proposed that the ultimate of ultimates was not a perceptible God reachable through mystical experience, but an inconceivable and unfathomable ‘something’ beyond all human possibility. His proposition rests on an important distinction between the mutually exclusive paths of mysticism and spiritual knowledge. Eckhart’s teaching is analysed as if it were an independent metaphysical proposition, detached from its historical and scholarly context. The overall explanatory perspective is that of a dedicated interest in metaphysical gnosis, as part of a quest (...)
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  44. I. Einheuser (2008). Fear of Knowledge. Philosophical Review 117 (3):451-455.
    A critical review of Paul Bogossian's `Fear of Knowledge', focusing on his criticism of factual relativism.
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  45. Simon Evnine (2008). Epistemic Dimensions of Personhood. Oxford University Press.
    Simon Evnine examines various epistemic aspects of what it is to be a person. Persons are defined as finite beings that have beliefs, including second-order beliefs about their own and others' beliefs, and are agents, capable of making long-term plans. It is argued that for any being meeting these conditions, a number of epistemic consequences obtain. First, all such beings must have certain logical concepts and be able to use them in certain ways. Secondly, there are at least two principles (...)
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  46. Yiftach J. H. Fehige (2010). The Negation of Nonsense is Nonsense: Hilary Putnam on Science and Religion. Neue Zeitschrift Für Systematische Theologie Und Religionsphilosophie 52 (4):350-376.
    While the influential analytical philosopher Hilary Putnam has made significant contributions to philosophy of mind, philosophy of language and philosophy of science, he isn't generally regarded as a philosopher of religion or a theologian. Nonetheless, I argue that his work should be of great interest to philosophers of religion and theologians. Focusing on the relationship between science and religion, this paper explores the importance of Putnam's attempt to reconcile his anti-metaphysical stance and his commitment to a religious form of life (...)
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  47. Maurizio Ferraris & Achille C. Varzi (2003). Che cosa c’è e che cos’è. Nous. Postille Su Pensieri 1:81–101.
    A philosophical exchange broadly inspired by the characters of Berkeley’s Three Dialogues. Hylas is the realist philosopher: the view he stands up for reflects a robust metaphysic that is reassuringly close to common sense, grounded on the twofold persuasion that the world comes structured into entities of various kinds and at various levels and that it is the task of philosophy, if not of science generally, to “bring to light” that structure. Philonous, by contrast, is the anti-realist philosopher (though not (...)
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  48. Hector Ferreiro (2012). La encrucijada de la metafísica tomista: la circularidad de la tesis de la causalidad recíproca entre el ser y la esencia. Studium 29:173-183.
    Tomás de Aquino diferencia como dos principios metafísicos diferentes la suma de de-terminaciones que especifican como tal a un ente y el hecho de que dicho ente efecti-vamente exista en la realidad. Ahora bien, al definirse como lo otro de la esencia el ser tiende a devenir él mismo una especie de esencia que requiere, al igual que la esencia propiamente dicha, ser puesto a su vez en la existencia. Este corolario fue derivado de la tesis de la distinción real (...)
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  49. Hector Ferreiro (2011). Del Ser Al Estar-Ahí: La Resustancialización Hegeliana Del Universo. In Diana López, María Sol Yuan & Cecilia Lammertyn (eds.), Experiencia y concepto: Intensidades clásicas y tensiones contemporáneas. Ediciones de la Universidad Nacional del Litoral.
    Con la tesis “el Absoluto es el ser”, Hegel quiere sentar el principio metafísico fundamental de la sustancialidad del Universo frente a las ontologías que lo conciben como una totalidad contingente. Para ello, sin embargo, la noción de “ser” (Sein) no debe ser absolutizada como tal, como puro ser, frente a la negación como tal o puro no-ser, es decir, frente a la nada. Ser y no-ser son para Hegel meras abstracciones del entendimiento humano. La primera verdadera y legítima noción (...)
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  50. Hector Ferreiro (2007). La Absolutización de la Esencia Como Axioma Fundamental de la Metafísica Tomista. Patristica Et Mediaevalia 28:83-97.
    Few theses characterize more especifically the metaphysics of Aquinas than the thesis of the real distinction between being and essence, the thesis of being as the act of the essence, the thesis of the ontological contingency of the universe and the conception of the cause of the existence of things as subsistent being. The aim of the present work is to prove that these theses, as well as others derived from them, like the claim of the identity of essence and (...)
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